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Welcome to the 2020 Open Education Conference! Check our FAQ and Orientation for instructions on how to log in and get started. Need a hand? Email contact@openeducationconference.org. Need to register? Do it here!

The conference has now concluded! Most recordings have now been posted. View the recording by clicking on the yellow Video Stream button. Please complete our Feedback Form if you haven’t already.

Log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Monday, November 9
 

9:00am EST

Join Discord
Click the "Video Stream" button above from your logged in account to join our Discord space! Discord is a private server where conference participants can engage in text and video conversations. It's organized into a series of channels with different themes, and you can share pictures, links, and reactions. If you've ever used Slack, it might feel familiar. But there are several features of Discord that make it a great place to gather.

We encourage you to give it a try!


Monday November 9, 2020 9:00am - 9:30am EST
Discord
  Community Connections, Activity

9:00am EST

Welcome Desk
Welcome to the 2020 Open Education Conference! We're so pleased that you're joining us, and we hope you have a wonderful virtual experience.

The Welcome Desk will be open most of the day to anyone who would like to stop in with questions, comments, or just to say hello. During breaks, there will be open breakout rooms that you can enter to connect with other attendees.

If you're here looking for help, here's a few additional resources you might find helpful:
You can also reach us in the following ways:

Monday November 9, 2020 9:00am - 6:00pm EST
Virtual Lobby
  Community Connections, Help

9:30am EST

Early Show
Each day will start with an informal conversation with the organizers and members of the conference community. The Early Show will provide a look at the day ahead, highlights so far, and opportunities to get to know different members of the community. Tune into the Zoom meeting to participate!

Planners
avatar for Winni Zhang

Winni Zhang

Open Education Ambassador, SPARC


Monday November 9, 2020 9:30am - 9:55am EST
All Together

10:00am EST

Welcome
Welcome to the 2020 Open Education Conference! This year is one of firsts: the first time in the conference's seventeen year history to be held as a virtual event, the first time the number of registered attendees breaks 1000, and the first time the conference is organized through a community-driven process.

This opening session will be led by members of the Steering Committee, who will share the story of how this year's conference came to be, what's in store for the next five days, and some suggestions for how you can get the most out of the experience.

The recording of this session will be posted, so that you can watch the welcome session no matter when you log in to participate.

Planners
avatar for Akanksha Bhatnagar

Akanksha Bhatnagar

Communications & Public Relations Officer, Canadian Alliance of Student Associations
Akanksha is the Communications and Public Relaltions Officer with a national student lobby organization. Akanksha was also the 2019/20 President of the University of Alberta Students' Union and the 2018-19 Vice President Academic where she Chaired of the University of Alberta Open... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Williamson

Daniel Williamson

Managing Director, OpenStax, Rice University
Daniel Williamson manages the day to day operations of OpenStax, using his extensive experience in academic e-publishing to guide content development, technology integration, and overall project coordination. A Rice University graduate, and passionate advocate of equity in education... Read More →
avatar for Danyal Hayat

Danyal Hayat

Manager Industrial Linkages & Technology Transfer, CECOS University
Danyal Hayat is an Engineer, Open Education advocate & a blogger who uses National/International platforms to run awareness campaigns & contribute to the Pakistani government policies being a stakeholder & member of the working groups in different policy making processes. Danyal has... Read More →
avatar for Emily Ragan

Emily Ragan

Associate Professor, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Excited about reimagining effective education. Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and OER Coordinator at Metropolitan State University of Denver
avatar for Ethan Senack

Ethan Senack

Chief of Staff, ISKME
avatar for Jasmine Roberts

Jasmine Roberts

Lecturer/Teaching Professor, The Ohio State University
Jasmine Roberts is an educator, speaker, writer and strategic communication professional. She joined the School of Communication at The Ohio State University in 2012, where she teaches upper level undergraduate courses in the areas of communication campaigns and strategic communication... Read More →
avatar for MJ Bishop

MJ Bishop

Associate Vice Chancellor and Director, Kirwan Center for Academic Innovation, University System of Maryland
Dr. MJ Bishop directs the University System of Maryland’s William E. Kirwan Center for Academic Innovation, which was established in 2013 to enhance USM's position as a national leader in higher education transformation. The Kirwan Center conducts research on best practices, disseminates... Read More →
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Director of Open Education, SPARC
Nicole Allen is the Director of Open Education at SPARC, a global coalition working to make open the default in research and education. A decade and a half ago, Nicole was an undergraduate student frustrated with the cost of textbooks. Today, she is an internationally recognized policy... Read More →
avatar for Regina Gong

Regina Gong

OER & Student Success Librarian, Michigan State University
I'm the Open Educational Resources (OER) & Student Success Librarian at Michigan State University (MSU). I've had extensive experience leading an OER program from the ground up at a community college where I used to work, and now at a land-grant, research university. You can ask me... Read More →
avatar for Spencer Ellis

Spencer Ellis

Director of Educational Innovation, Colorado Department of Higher Education
avatar for Tiffani Reardon

Tiffani Reardon

Affordable Learning Georgia Program Manager, University System of Georgia
Talk to me about: instructional design, tech com/writing, accessibility, oer, open pedagogy, dogs, cats, geek stuff


Monday November 9, 2020 10:00am - 10:25am EST
All Together
  Plenary, Plenary

10:30am EST

Choose Your Own Adventure
Following the conference opening, there will be an open hour to "choose your own adventure" to prepare for the conference. These informal breakout sessions are intended to offer space to mentally prepare for the conference in the way that makes the most sense for you.

Check out the available options by heading back to the schedule.

Monday November 9, 2020 10:30am - 11:25am EST
All Together
  Community Connections, Conversation

10:30am EST

Explore "View Anytime" Content
Given this year's virtual format, the conference decided to maximize the viewing possibilities by inviting asynchronous contributions. Between the 10 minute Lightning Talks and the multi-format "Showcase Gallery" content, there's about 100 asynchronous sessions for you to browse and enjoy throughout the conference.

Browse"View Anytime" Sessions

You may have noticed the Lightning Talk and Showcase Gallery sessions scheduled at the end of each day. Because conference agenda tools haven't yet adapted for the virtual conference era, we're not able to schedule sessions without putting them at a specific time. So, the program committee decided to offer a set of featured asynchronous sessions each day—but all are available right now to watch in any order you want.

Don't quite know where to start? Here's a few suggestions...

Lessons Learned:Got Data?:​​​​
STEAM Driving:

Monday November 9, 2020 10:30am - 11:25am EST
Concurrent 2
  Community Connections, Activity

10:30am EST

Get to Know Discord
Come to the Discord Playground!

Just finding out about Discord? Learn more about how to download or use in your browser here https://discord.com/.

In addition to learning about how to navigate the OpenEd20 Discord server and connect with open education advocates from around the globe, you will also have the opportunity to learn more about how to create your own Discord server, and how it can be used as a powerful communication, community, and educational tool. At the beginning of the session, I'll get you onto the OpenEd20 conference server and into a Discord Playground server to test a few tricks of your own!

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Hutton

Sarah Hutton

Head, Student Success and Engagement, University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries
I'm a librarian and doctoral candidate whose research focuses on open education and open educational practices (OEP). Member of the CC Global Network, GO-GN, and OE4BW collaborator. Also an artist and parent to human munchkins and fur babies.


Monday November 9, 2020 10:30am - 11:25am EST
Concurrent 4
  Community Connections, Activity

10:30am EST

Open Education Orientation
Do you consider yourself new to open education? Welcome! We're excited you're here.

The reality is that open education is a relatively new field that is still working to define itself, so everyone here is new in some respect. That said, there are some things that can be helpful to know, so you don't have to spend the first half of the week trying to figure out terminology, acronyms, or who's involved.

This session will be structured as an informal conversation among those who feel newer to the space. We'll explore some key information about open education and answer questions—and no, there isn't any such thing as a question that is too simple to ask! Bring them on.

Speakers
avatar for Lee Miller

Lee Miller

Director of Innovation and Compliance, Barton Community College


Monday November 9, 2020 10:30am - 11:25am EST
Concurrent 1
  Community Connections, Activity

10:30am EST

Speed Networking
Does your sense of adventure involve meeting new people? Then this session is for you! This session will leverage Zoom breakout rooms to facilitate a speed networking session. Here's how that will work:
  • Click the yellow button above to join the Zoom meeting (shows up 10 min before start time to logged in users).
  • The session host will start the meeting and go over the ground rules for the session. 
  • The group will be split up into breakout rooms of 2-3 people for 5 minutes to exchange answers to the question "What is your superpower?"
  • After the first breakout sessions end, the group will come back and split out again!

Monday November 9, 2020 10:30am - 11:25am EST
Concurrent 3
  Community Connections, Activity

11:30am EST

Tea Time
"Tea time" is a break in scheduled programming when attendees can rest, practice self-care, or dive into networking or asynchronous sessions. There is no scheduled programming during this time.

If you choose, here is a set of themed lightning talks to consider. So, grab a favorite beverage and tune in to these short presentations. Feel free to take the conversation to Discord and share your thoughts with others.

Student Focused:
Integration of Student Perception Data with Multi-mode Learning Analytics for Continuous Improvement of Course Materials
Sustainable Textbooks through Curation of Student Work



Monday November 9, 2020 11:30am - 11:55am EST
All Together
  Community Connections, Break

12:00pm EST

Monday Plenary: What Does Open Education Mean to You?
The first plenary session of the conference will focus on the meaning of open education through the practice of storytelling. This interactive experience will focus on the people who drive the open education movement.

The session will begin with an interactive polling exercise to explore who is in the room, what their education priorities are, and what open education means to them. Then, the session will introduce an interactive storytelling exercise, where participants will have a chance to break out into small groups to share their own personal story—starting at the very beginning, and explaining the journey to the shared experience of the conference.

For those who prefer not to break out, a panel of open education advocates and practitioners will share their stories in the main room (recorded so those who join breakouts don't miss out!) The practice of story circles is adapted from OpenCon, and if you're on the fence, we encourage you to read more about it.

This year's Open Education Conference is all about community, and this session will offer a chance to get to know people in a way we rarely have the opportunity to do! Join us for an interactive journey.

Planners
avatar for Akanksha Bhatnagar

Akanksha Bhatnagar

Communications & Public Relations Officer, Canadian Alliance of Student Associations
Akanksha is the Communications and Public Relaltions Officer with a national student lobby organization. Akanksha was also the 2019/20 President of the University of Alberta Students' Union and the 2018-19 Vice President Academic where she Chaired of the University of Alberta Open... Read More →
avatar for Amanda Larson

Amanda Larson

Affordable Learning Instructional Consultant, The Ohio State University
avatar for Sarah Hammershaimb

Sarah Hammershaimb

Graduate Student, Athabasca University
Hi everyone! I'm excited to be part of the Open Education community. I am a teacher librarian from Denver, Colorado and an EdD student at Athabasca University. I have worked as an elementary classroom teacher, public librarian and elementary teacher librarian, and am currently involved... Read More →
avatar for Spencer Ellis

Spencer Ellis

Director of Educational Innovation, Colorado Department of Higher Education



Monday November 9, 2020 12:00pm - 1:25pm EST
All Together
  Plenary, Plenary

12:30pm EST

Story Circles: Last Names Starting With A-F
If your last name starts with the letter A-F, join this room when the introductory portion of the plenary session ends to participate in a breakout storytelling exercise.

When you enter, you'll be placed in a breakout room with ~8 other participants and have a chance to share your origin stories with each other. Each person has 5 minutes to reflect on the meaning of open education and answer the question "What brought you to where you are now?"

Within your group designate:
  • A facilitator who will go first 
  • A timekeeper who will ensure everyone keeps to 5 minutes


Monday November 9, 2020 12:30pm - 1:25pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Community Connections, Conversation

12:30pm EST

Story Circles: Last Names Starting With G-N
If your last name starts with the letter G-N, join this room when the introductory portion of the plenary session ends to participate in a breakout storytelling exercise.

When you enter, you'll be placed in a breakout room with ~8 other participants and have a chance to share your origin stories with each other. Each person has 5 minutes to reflect on the meaning of open education and answer the question "What brought you to where you are now?"

Within your group designate:
  • A facilitator who will go first 
  • A timekeeper who will ensure everyone keeps to 5 minutes


Monday November 9, 2020 12:30pm - 1:25pm EST
Concurrent 2
  Community Connections, Conversation

12:30pm EST

Story Circles: Last Names Starting With O-Z
If your last name starts with the letter O-Z, join this room when the introductory portion of the plenary session ends to participate in a breakout storytelling exercise.

When you enter, you'll be placed in a breakout room with ~8 other participants and have a chance to share your origin stories with each other. Each person has 5 minutes to reflect on the meaning of open education and answer the question "What brought you to where you are now?"

Within your group designate:
  • A facilitator who will go first 
  • A timekeeper who will ensure everyone keeps to 5 minutes


Monday November 9, 2020 12:30pm - 1:25pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Community Connections, Conversation

1:30pm EST

Tea Time
"Tea time" is a break in scheduled programming when attendees can rest, practice self-care, or dive into networking or asynchronous sessions. If you chose, here is a set of themed lightning talks to consider. So, grab a favorite beverage and tune in to these short presentations. Feel free to take the conversation to Discord and share your thoughts with others.

Creation:
Creating an OER: 101
Creating Open Resources: An Example

Monday November 9, 2020 1:30pm - 1:55pm EST
Break
  Community Connections, Break

1:30pm EST

Tea Time Yoga (aka yOERga!)
Got Zoom fatigue? Is your back sore from sitting at the computer? This Tea Time yoga break is definitely for you! Join the Zoom meeting for a 25 minute yoga session that will refresh your mind and body.

Monday November 9, 2020 1:30pm - 1:55pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Community Connections, Activity

2:00pm EST

Students and Faculty as Co-Creators... During the Pandemic
At two of the Maricopa Community Colleges, faculty leads have coordinated the hiring of student workers as OER Specialists with whom faculty across the colleges may work to make their OER dreams come true (well, that's the ideal). This panel discussion will showcase reflections and experiences from faculty members and student workers involved in collaborative OER projects before and during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Examples of projects, collaborative methods, and best (and worst) practices will be provided. Come see an example of how institutional support along with faculty and student initiative can lead to creative and exciting opportunities for OER development, even in emergency and remote work environments!

Learning Outcomes:
-Describe concrete examples of student-faculty collaboration in the development and curation of OER materials
-Describe successful efforts to scale OER student worker programs across colleges
-Describe experiences of co-creation from student, faculty, and administrative perspectives
-Describe ways of collaborating remotely

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Young

Lisa Young

Faculty Director, Center for Teaching and Learning, Scottsdale Community College
I serve Scottsdale Community College as the Instructional Design and Educational Technology faculty member.I am passionate about helping our students learn whether it be through excellent instructional design, the use of educational technology to resolve and mitigate instructional... Read More →
avatar for Matthew Bloom

Matthew Bloom

OER Coordinator, Maricopa Community Colleges
avatar for Philip Root

Philip Root

Residential Faculty, Scottsdale Community College
avatar for Madison Reeve

Madison Reeve

OER Student Specialist, Scottsdale Community College
avatar for Rachel Simmons

Rachel Simmons

Program Director, Scottsdale Community College
avatar for Jessica Parsons

Jessica Parsons

OER Specialists, Maricopa Community Colleges - Paradise Valley


Monday November 9, 2020 2:00pm - 2:25pm EST
Concurrent 4
  COVID-19, Presentation

2:00pm EST

Getting Started with OER
Are you new to open educational resources and want to learn more? This session will cover the basics of OER and building an OER program. Whether you’re an instructor, librarian, administrator, instructional designer, or student advocate, you'll leave this session with a wealth of resources to help you kick-start an OER initiative or your adoption, adaptation, or creation of OER.

Learning Outcomes:
- How OER differ from free resources
- Where to find open textbooks and ancillary materials
- What resources are available for customizing OER
- How to incorporate open pedagogy into a course
- How to collaborate with campus partners and build an OER program
- How to raise awareness of OER
- How to connect with other OER advocates

Speakers
avatar for Cheryl Cuillier

Cheryl Cuillier

Open Education Librarian, University of Arizona Libraries


Monday November 9, 2020 2:00pm - 2:25pm EST
Concurrent 2
  Open Education 101, Presentation

2:00pm EST

Faculty Experiences of OER Learning Circles
Dr. Karen Pikula is a Psychology Instructor for Central Lakes College and OER Faculty Development Coordinator for Minnesota State. Dr. Pikula has created an innovative way to maintain engagement and progress in faculty adoption and creation of OER. Her OER Learning Circles provide facilitated pathways for faculty to author ancillary materials, redesign their courses with OER, or author their own OER. Participants receive not only guidance and encouragement from leaders and peers, but also and importantly recognition and compensation for their OER output.

Open Education is expanding in scope beyond just providing lower-cost textbooks. OER now can provide increased accessibility, new forms of active participatory learning, and can be used to address inequities inside and outside the classroom. The Learning Circle model allows participants to showcase their own efforts and share a variety of experiences and new ideas.

Prior to OER, instructors had been constrained by the materials made available by publishers. OER allows faculty to tailor materials specifically to course objectives, learning outcomes, and student needs. The flexibility to “remix” openly-licensed content allows incredible flexibility, but can be a daunting prospect for new users of OER. The Learning Circle format smooths the path to from adoption to adaptation to authoring.

This session will showcase several faculty and librarians who have participated in and benefited from the OER Learning Circle model. They will describe their experiences, their projects, and how many of them were able to use this opportunity to address issues of accessibility, diversity, equity and cultural relevance.

Several of the panelists are veterans of a number of Learning Circles; some have taken part in an additional Learning Circle Leader cohort and have begun working with administrators to host OER Learning circles on their own campuses, and will share this experience as well.



Learning Outcomes:
This session will provide participants with new ideas for how to support, develop, and grow OER adoption on their campus, and improve their use of OER materials in their own professional practice. Participants will receive testimonials from Learning Circle members, describing their OER projects and how the Learning Circle format facilitated their work.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Gucinski

Mark Gucinski

Biology Faculty, St. Cloud Technical and Community College
avatar for Elissah Becknell

Elissah Becknell

Library Faculty, Minneapolis Community and Technical College
avatar for Karen Pikula

Karen Pikula

OER Faculty Development Coordnator, Minnesota State
Supporting faculty in adopting OER, redesigning courses and authoring of OER materials through collaborative cross disciplinary OER Learning Circles.Print on Demand Services. Z-Degree (zero Textbook cost AA degree). I am interested in talking to anyone about their experiences in using... Read More →
avatar for Dan Alosso

Dan Alosso

Asst. Professor/ History, Bemidji State University
I teach Environmental, US, and World History at Bemidji State and reuse, remix, edit, and author OER for my courses. Planning to get 100% away from commercial textbooks by end of 2019-20 academic year.
avatar for Carolyn Weber

Carolyn Weber

Communication Studies Faculty, Minnesota West Community and Technical College
avatar for Monica Roth Day

Monica Roth Day

Associate Professor of Social Work, Metropolitan State University
I am an associate professor of social work at Metropolitan State University in St. Paul, Minnesota. My journey to the use and creation of OERs has provided me with new creative outlets, enhanced teaching strategies, and more connections with students. I've taught for more than 20... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca March

Rebecca March

Librarian/Instructor, Minneapolis Community & Technical College
avatar for Kate Brau

Kate Brau

Health and Physical Education faculty, Hibbing Community College
avatar for Nick Heisserer

Nick Heisserer

Business Faculty, Central Lakes College


Monday November 9, 2020 2:00pm - 2:25pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Strategies, Presentation

2:00pm EST

We Can Make a Difference: The Impact of OER Initiatives
This session provides results that show that OER initiatives DO make a different, and that this difference can be substantial.
Open Educational Resources have been around for more than a decade, yet the majority of U.S. higher education faculty remain unaware. How can that be? Clearly, the marketing of OER as an idea to teaching faculty has failed. However, all is not lost.
A Bay View Analytics study of 4,339 faculty and 1,431 chairpersons from public institutions shows that faculty who are aware of an OER initiative adopt OER at three to four times the rate of those who are not aware. Likewise, those aware of initiatives also report much higher willingness to consider future adoption of OER. These results span all types of faculty and all types of higher education institutions.
The results demonstrate that there is potential to build far greater awareness of OER among teaching faculty, using the systems and mechanisms already in place. The presentation will address what next steps show the most promise, based on the reported results.


Learning Outcomes:
Participants will learn:
1.What is an OER Initiative?
2.What are the different types of OER Initiatives?
3.What impact do OER Initiatives have on faculty decisions about course materials?
4.How does COVID impact OER adoptions and OER initiatives?
5.Recommendations and next steps for participants

Speakers
avatar for Tanya Spilovoy

Tanya Spilovoy

Director, Open Policy, WCET (WICHE Cooperative for Educational Technologies)
avatar for Jeff Seaman

Jeff Seaman

Director, Bay View Analytics


Monday November 9, 2020 2:00pm - 2:25pm EST
Concurrent 5
  The Field, Presentation

2:00pm EST

Open Educational Resources as Tools to Foster Equity
Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching and learning materials that are available without access fees. In addition to reducing the financial costs of education, the licensing of OER provides flexibility for innovation and creativity through what is termed OER-enabled pedagogy. By promoting access to quality learning materials, being adaptable to student needs and inclusive of diverse communities and people, and providing opportunities to underrepresented groups to share their knowledge and voice, OER serve as a tool to improve teaching and learning and promote social justice in higher education classrooms. As supported by research evidence, the benefits of OER may be particularly helpful for students who have not been well served traditionally in higher education, such as students from lower socioeconomic status backgrounds, first generation students, and students with disabilities. In this interactive discussion on how OER may be used as a tool for social justice, we briefly review the direct impact of OER adoption on reducing financial barriers to accessing education. This is followed by an explanation of OER licensing that allows for instructors to remix and revise materials and how this licensing affords instructors opportunities to adapt materials to be more culturally responsive, effectively align with learning objectives, and inclusive of student needs. Participants will engage with examples of OER in break out rooms to edit, remix, and revise materials to make them better suited for equitable education. This will follow with a discussion of how OER-enabled pedagogy can empower students to be active agents in their own learning through development of materials, collaborative learning, opportunities for sharing ideas and creative expression, and participatory activities. Participants will develop examples of how they could apply these principles in their own courses in break out rooms. By sharing these ideas, participants can give and receive feedback on their OER-enabled pedagogy possibilities and develop ideas for new techniques.

Learning Outcomes:
Understand OER-enabled pedagogy (open pedagogy)
Understand OER licensing
Apply material adaptations to make for more inclusive and equitable teaching

Resources for this session: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1W8w3r0_fxhl02I6gDHA9yvH_7fKez8piTAJMGeapMJU/edit?usp=sharing

Speakers
avatar for Virginia Clinton-Lisell

Virginia Clinton-Lisell

Assistant Professor, University of North Dakota
Dr. Virginia Clinton-Lisell began her career in education as an ESL teacher in New York City. She then obtained her PhD in Educational Psychology with a minor in Cognitive Science at the University of Minnesota where she was trained in educational research. She has published over... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Legerski

Elizabeth Legerski

Associate Professor, University of North Dakota
avatar for Bri Rhodes

Bri Rhodes

PhD student, International Student Advisor, Mount Holyoke College & University of North Dakota
avatar for Staci Gilpin

Staci Gilpin

Assistant Professor, The College of St. Scholastica
I am an Assistant Professor in the School of Education at The College of St. Scholastica and a doctoral student in Educational Foundations and Research at the University of North Dakota. I teach and design graduate and undergraduate courses using multiple delivery methods to include... Read More →


Monday November 9, 2020 2:00pm - 2:55pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Open Education 101, Interactive Discussion

2:30pm EST

Everything You Didn't Want to Know About OER: A Toolkit That Will Boost Your Confidence
This session is geared toward librarians, but is also relevant to faculty, instructional designers, students, and anyone charged with leading an OER initiative. On many college campuses, advocating for and supporting OER programs is a one-person job...but it doesn't have to be. Let's face it-- not everyone is overly enthusiastic to add one more thing to their job responsibilities. As the role of liaison librarians continues to adapt and evolve, liaison librarians should have a basic understanding of OER and the ways it can support faculty and student success. But who has time?
In this presentation, an OER Librarian from a community college will detail the competencies and resources librarians need in order to collaborate with faculty in supporting and sustaining a strong OER program on their campus.
An easily adaptable “OER Toolkit for Librarians” developed as a capstone project for the SPARC Open Education Leadership Program in 2019-20 will be detailed and shared. The toolkit was developed as a resource for non-OER Librarians, but is useful for anyone tasked with leading an OER program at their institution. Attendees will be introduced to, and/or become more familiar with: open education and open educational resources, copyright and Creative Commons, Open Pedagogy, how to find OER and open images, where to connect with OER communities, and more.



Learning Outcomes:
Attendees of this session will be able to: search efficiently for OER, confidently support faculty working with OER, locate OER community resources, identify and recommend quality OER, adapt an OER toolkit for their own library or institution

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Beechey

Michelle Beechey

Access Services & OER Librarian, Monroe Community College


Monday November 9, 2020 2:30pm - 2:55pm EST
Concurrent 4
  Open Education 101, Presentation

2:30pm EST

The Beginner's Guide to a College-wide OER Implementation
Representatives from Prince George's Community College will present to you their beginner’s guide to an OER implementation at the organizational level. In this presentation, you will learn about the structure of a sustainable OER initiative, the necessary stakeholders and the project plan that was used to implement OERs at Prince George's Community College. The presenters will discuss how the OER courses were chosen and how faculty were encouraged to participate. They will also talk about the challenges and lessons learned from their first year implementation. At the end of the presentation, you will walk away with a clear and duplicatable process for starting and sustaining a college-wide OER implementation.

Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the presentation, participants will learn the following:
- The structure and support needed for a college-wide OER implementation
- How to encourage faculty participation
- High impact areas to implement OER courses
- Necessary support for sustainability
- Outcomes and Results
- Lessons Learned

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Bowles

Deborah Bowles

Coordinator, Professional Development Training, Prince George's Community College
avatar for Michael Smith

Michael Smith

Chairman, Technology, Engineering and Construction, Prince George's Community College


Monday November 9, 2020 2:30pm - 2:55pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Open Education 101, Presentation

2:30pm EST

Collaboratively Building an Inclusive OER Music Appreciation Textbook
Traditional music appreciation curricula outline the development of Western classical music. Such curricula focus on the canon of composers—mostly white, male, and European—whose work is heard in concert halls and opera houses. Some recent textbooks have made an effort to include popular styles and non-white musicians and composers, but without undermining the Eurocentric narrative or critiquing the focus on concert music. In 2018, instructors at the University of North Georgia began the process of redesigning the music appreciation curriculum to encompass a truly diverse set of works, artists, and practices. We abandoned the chronological approach and organized the curriculum around a series of themes. Our work culminated in the creation of an OER textbook that was published by the University of North Georgia Press. Although it was published in May 2020, the textbook—which comes with a full set of pedagogical materials—has already been adopted by programs around the country and has elicited strong positive commentary.

In this session, we will share the process by which the text was collaboratively developed and we will provide an overview of the contents. We will discuss the difficulties and triumphs involved in organizing a diverse group of co-authors. We will share testimonials from students and instructors about how this new curriculum has positively impacted their experience in the classroom. Then, we will lead session participants in identifying general-education classes at their own institutions that could benefit from a similar approach. Participants will leave with an understanding of how this process empowers instructors to shape a curriculum and boosts student success by providing them with zero-cost materials tailored to the course, and how a similar process can facilitate progress toward decolonization of Eurocentric curricula. Participants will additionally leave with an articulated plan for implementing or advocating for a similar process at their own institution.

Learning Outcomes:
Session participants will:

1. Learn how to manage the process of authoring a textbook in collaboration with a diverse group of instructors
2. Investigate how collaboration can help instructors to reenvision curriculum
3. Discuss the advantages of adopting an OER textbook
4. Examine the advantages of writing an OER text instead of simply adopting
5. Identify courses at home institutions that could benefit from the collaborative production of an OER text

Speakers
avatar for Esther Morgan-Ellis

Esther Morgan-Ellis

Associate Professor, University of North Georgia
avatar for Rebecca Johnston

Rebecca Johnston

Associate Director, CTLL, University of North Georgia
Hello! I am Associate Director of the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Leadership at the University of North Georgia, where I administer a team of center directors and associated fellows who provide faculty development programming to the university at large. In my role, I oversee... Read More →


Monday November 9, 2020 2:30pm - 2:55pm EST
Concurrent 5
  Practices, Presentation

2:30pm EST

Heard at a Tenure/Promotion meeting...What is OER?
The nature of scholarship as well as the value of the “scholarship of teaching” have been debated for decades. OERs are a tough sell to tenure and promotion committees in great part due to the combination of historical attitudes toward textbook authorship and the skepticism that developed surrounding digital publications. This presentation will provide a historical view of faculty and administrative attitudes that have surrounded the production of textbooks throughout the last century as well as those that developed with growing scholarly production of digital objects.

The speaker will outline methods that have been employed by scholarly institutions to address these concerns.


Learning Outcomes:
1. Attendees will become familiar with the history of textbooks and attitudes toward textbook authors by faculty committees
2. Attendees will become familiar with the issues of acceptability of digital publication by faculty committees
3. Attendees will be able to identify potential methods for changing campus attitudes toward the value and scholarship of OER creation

Speakers
avatar for Lora Lennertz

Lora Lennertz

Data Services Librarian, University of Arkansas


Monday November 9, 2020 2:30pm - 2:55pm EST
Concurrent 2
  The Field, Presentation

3:00pm EST

Pivoting in a Pandemic: How to Create an Online Asynchronous Course for OER Outreach & Education
As educational institutions have pivoted to work from home, your strategies for providing educational and professional development opportunities to teachers and faculty have to pivot as well! While the global pandemic has created much anxiety and unrest, it has also allowed us the opportunity to reflect. This process allows us to invest in new and different strategies for our work. Disparities in student access, finances, and culturally-reflective materials have taken stage in campus conversations--and rightly so. Creating online, asynchronous courses or workshops is one way to effectively reach a large number of educators at your institution and develop professional opportunities for faculty learning and growth. It can also help you reflect on the knowledge and skills that need development on your campus, a foundation for content creation that will allow for iterative and repeatable design, and a format that will work with the busy and often chaotic schedules your colleagues are grappling with. But how would you get started? This presentation will walk you through a proven, step-by step process to develop an online professional development program for your institution. In learning about the program piloted in Summer 2020 at California State, Dominguez Hills, you will be able to clarify your own goals in developing this type of professional development outreach and education, an assessment strategy, and feel confident in pitching this type of outreach to your institutional partners. You will learn tips for organizing the instructional design process, clarifying your learning outcomes and goals, introducing topics of social justice into your curriculum, and hear top lessons learned from Cristina Springfield (she/her), an OER librarian that recently developed two online OER courses for her university’s faculty. This session is designed for folks that have a basic understanding of OER and who are looking for ways to do more outreach and education with faculty at their own institutions, especially in an online environment. While the case study presented is in the context of a 4-year university, the process could be used at any type of educational institution.

Learning Outcomes:
Participants will be able to 1) Summarize the process of designing an online, asynchronous professional development OER course 2) Clarify their goals in developing an online professional development program as well as their assessment strategy
3) Explain the benefits of providing an asynchronous OER professional development class to campus community members

Speakers
avatar for Cristina Springfield

Cristina Springfield

OER Librarian, California State University, Dominguez HIlls
My passions include connecting people with information, issues surrounding digital privacy, the continual evolution of library services to support students, and open educational resources.


Monday November 9, 2020 3:00pm - 3:25pm EST
Concurrent 2
  COVID-19, Presentation

3:00pm EST

Get Your Bearings: Building Relationships and Using Data to Understand Your Unique Campus
For new OER advocates, learning where to start and how to get traction on their campus can be overwhelming. Popular methods like stipends for faculty, library-based publishing platforms, or learning groups may not be possible due to limited funding, staff, or faculty interest. Strategies that resulted in early adoptions at one school may meet resistance at another, and educational outreach efforts can have a mixed reception. This session will examine how understanding the unique needs and structure of a campus can help librarians and advocates develop strategies tailored to their institution and their capacity for support.

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is a private, STEM-focused institution with two traditional residential campuses, and a network of online and satellite campuses spread throughout the world. Interest in OER and textbook affordability has grown rapidly since 2017, and a dedicated position was created to support the larger residential campus and the distance learning campus. Each of these campuses have unique challenges and opportunities that make a one-size-fits-all approach untenable, especially with a single position dedicated to textbook affordability.

The presenter will discuss how she built strategic relationships, leveraged existing units on campus, and used data to build tailored strategies for one residential campus and the worldwide online campuses. Each campus will be presented as a case study, and the audience will be invited to consider how they can develop a better understanding of their campus, and how it can be used to inform their OER support and outreach efforts.

Learning Outcomes:
-Participants will explore various strategies to increase understanding of OER challenges and opportunities on their campus.
-Participants will develop an understanding of how to assess advocacy strategies in the context of their campus needs and their support capacity.
-Participants will reflect on their own campus environment in order to identify what advocacy and support approaches might be most effective in their communities.

Speakers
avatar for Cassandra Konz

Cassandra Konz

Scholarly Communication Librarian, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
Cassandra Konz is an early career librarian, self-professed copyright nerd, and generally curious person.  At Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, she heads the Open & Affordable Textbook Initiative for the Daytona Beach and Worldwide/Online campuses, which seeks to leverage open... Read More →


Monday November 9, 2020 3:00pm - 3:25pm EST
Concurrent 4
  Open Education 101, Presentation

3:00pm EST

Using Open Content to Create a Culturally Relevant Classroom
The experience students have in the college classroom and with faculty are one of the most important factors in determining whether they persist in their courses, feel a sense of belonging on their campuses, and ultimately earn a degree. However, far too often classroom instruction is not designed in such a way that reflects the lived experiences and cultures of non-traditional and traditionally underserved students, an omission that only exacerbates the achievement gaps that persist between Black, Hispanic and low-income students and their white and wealthier peers. To improve the classroom experience for these students, faculty need to intentionally design and teach courses that acknowledge and embrace student diversity in all its forms by employing culturally relevant teaching practices.

Culturally relevant teaching practices position the learner's cultural identities at the core of the learning process and use the learner's cultural knowledge, experiences, and frames of reference to help the them succeed in the course. Culturally relevant teaching practices can be extended to the course materials as well when used with openly licensed content. Because it is openly licensed, OER can be adapted by faculty or students in ways that reflect students’ experiences and cultural identities and support the culturally relevant classroom.

During this session, Ruanda Garth-McCullough, Associate Director of Teaching and Learning for Achieving the Dream, and Richard Sebastian, Director of Open and Digital Learning for Achieving the Dream, will describe the culturally relevant teaching framework, why it is an effective strategy to employ, especially for traditionally underserved students, and how openly licensed materials can be used to enable and support culturally relevant teaching in the classroom.

Learning Outcomes:
During this presentation attendees will be able to:
* Explain what culturally responsive teaching (CRT) is and why it is an effective teaching strategy
* Describe the unique ways openly licensed content can be used to facilitate and enable CRT
* Share relevant examples of how college faculty have used openly licensed materials to support CRT in their classrooms

Speakers
avatar for Richard Sebastian

Richard Sebastian

Director, Open and Digital Learning, Achieving the Dream
As Achieving the Dream’s Director of Open and Digital Learning, Dr. Sebastian helps ATD’s Network colleges advance open and digital teaching and learning practices to support equitable outcomes for students and facilitate whole college transformation. Dr. Sebastian is a national... Read More →
avatar for Ruanda Garth-McCullough

Ruanda Garth-McCullough

Associate Director of Teaching and Learning, Achieving the Dream
Ruanda Garth-McCullough, Ph.D.,  is an Associate Director of Teaching and Learning at Achieving the Dream. For 12 years, Ruanda was a faculty member in the School of Education at Loyola University of Chicago. Her expertise in culturally relevant teaching guides her professional... Read More →


Monday November 9, 2020 3:00pm - 3:25pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Social Justice, Presentation

3:00pm EST

Z Degrees at 5 Colleges in 12 Months
The State of Minnesota’s 91st Legislature passed Senate File 2415 in the spring 2019 session. This bill included a directive for the Minnesota State colleges and universities system, stating that three additional colleges must offer the opportunity to earn a Z-Degree by the academic year 2020-2021. It’s now Fall 2020 and Minnesota State is offering five new zero cost degrees (Z-Degrees) at five different colleges, developed in just 12 months. Attendees will learn of the struggles, the shared victories, and the commitment needed to do the seemingly impossible.

Learning Outcomes:
Participants will learn how Minnesota State in one year, expanded from 1 to 6 colleges offering Zero Textbook Cost (Z) Degrees:
•Building a Foundation with OER
•Assessing Readiness to offer a Z Degree
•Supporting the Work
•Managing and Meeting the Challenge
•Promoting the Results
Resources will be shared for those who wish to reuse or modify our approach.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Kelly

Stephen Kelly

Open Education and Innovation Program Coordinator, Minnesota State
I oversee the innovation funding program in the Minnesota State colleges and universities system. I enjoy conversations about anything related to innovation in higher education.
avatar for Tim Anderson

Tim Anderson

System Director for Student Success Technologies, Minnesota State Colleges and Universities
avatar for Kim Lynch

Kim Lynch

Senior System Director, Minnesota State Colleges and Universities


Monday November 9, 2020 3:00pm - 3:25pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Strategies, Presentation

3:30pm EST

"Mad Tea"
For this tea time, we are going to do a Mad/Wild Tea networking session. Based on one of the community-building activities in Equity Unbound, this activity promotes small group intimacy and collaboration and makes a large group session feel interactive.

Speakers
avatar for Maha Bali

Maha Bali

Associate professor of practice, American University in Cairo
Maha Bali is Associate Professor of Practice at the Center for Learning and Teaching at the American University in Cairo. She has a PhD in Education from the University of Sheffield, UK. She is co-founder of virtuallyconnecting.org (a grassroots movement that challenges academic gatekeeping... Read More →
avatar for Mia Zamora

Mia Zamora

Associate Professor, School of English Studies, Kean University
Writer. Educator. Connector. Maker.Associate Professor of English, Director of MA in Writing Studies & Kean University Writing Project; DML blogger.
avatar for Regina Gong

Regina Gong

OER & Student Success Librarian, Michigan State University
I'm the Open Educational Resources (OER) & Student Success Librarian at Michigan State University (MSU). I've had extensive experience leading an OER program from the ground up at a community college where I used to work, and now at a land-grant, research university. You can ask me... Read More →


Monday November 9, 2020 3:30pm - 3:55pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Community Connections, Activity

3:30pm EST

Tea Time
Whew! We've made it through the first six hours of programming. Time to take a break and reflect on all you've learned so far. If you're ready for more action, join Mad Tea with Maha Bali. If you'd like to relax, take in some of the some of the asynchronous sessions below.

Language Focused:
Campus Innovation, System Support, and External Partners: Building a Sustainable Spanish Project
French-Language OER in Quebec: Challenges and Opportunities

Monday November 9, 2020 3:30pm - 3:55pm EST
Break
  Community Connections, Break

4:00pm EST

Libros en Español: Creating Language Equity through Open Education
Do a quick search for Open Educational Resources (OER) in any language other than English, and it quickly becomes clear that current OER materials lack linguistic diversity. In this session we will present a new digital texts project, Libros en español, a robust collection of Spanish language, open access texts, hosted on the City of New York’s (CUNY) instance of Manifold. We will introduce you to the Manifold publishing platform and to its new reading group function, which is a great way to foster student engagement through social annotation of digital texts. You will also see an example of how Manifold and Libros en español are currently being used at Lehman College (CUNY) to create an Open Education course, Conociendo a Galdós (Meeting Galdós). We hope that our presentation will inspire you to create and advocate for the development of Open Educational Resources in languages other than English at your own institution.

Learning Outcomes:
- Gain an understanding of the importance of Open Education/Open Educational Resource production in languages other than English.
- Learn about Manifold, an open-source publishing platform, and see an example of how it can be used to create a zero-textbook-cost course.
- See how Open Education/Open Educational Resources in Spanish can foster a greater appreciation and elevate voices from the Spanish-speaking World.

Speakers
avatar for Robin Miller

Robin Miller

Open Educational Technologist, The Graduate Center, CUNY
avatar for Juan Jesús Payán

Juan Jesús Payán

Assistant Professor, Lehman College, CUNY


Monday November 9, 2020 4:00pm - 4:25pm EST
Concurrent 5
  Practices, Presentation

4:00pm EST

Faculty OER Experts' Strategies for Advancing Adoption of OER in Higher Education
In 2011, Saveri and Chwierut described open education/OER as one of seven disruptive innovations in education. For more than a decade, proponents have made a strong case for OER to facilitate students’ academic success. Despite the well-documented value of OER to advancing access, equity, and inclusion, significant progress remains elusive. 
Against this backdrop, in what ways do faculty need to reimagine their work in order to advance OER adoption? What areas do faculty feel are in their purview to reshape to enable greater acceptance of OER? What will move faculty from roles as responders to active leaders in advancing OER use?

In this presentation, I will discuss the results of a study undertaken to grapple with faculty adoption of OER. Sixteen faculty OER experts from diverse institutions provided their insights into the OER activities that they perceived as being most important for faculty to tackle and those activities most likely to be actually adopted by faculty. This presentation will examine the 35 activities identified by the OER expert panel as being needed to advance adoption, and of those 35, the 17 activities they felt most important and the 11 that they felt they had agency to actually implement. Finally, the audience and presenter will engage in a discussion and Q & A of the relatively small number of OER activities that the experts felt were both equally important and likely to be implemented by their faculty colleagues over the next 10 years and discuss how the Expert Panel strategies align with the strategies and priorities at their institutions.

Learning Outcomes:
Attendees will receive strategies as well as insights for advancing faculty adoption of OER from faculty who have utilized OER in their courses for five to fifteen years. These strategies may be used as a basis for beginning or continuing a dialog among faculty colleagues and other partners at their institutions. The discussion among audience members may heighten awareness of activities that need to be prioritized in order to advance OER adoption within their educational environments.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie  Sterling Brasley

Stephanie Sterling Brasley

Dean, University Library, California State University, Dominguez Hills
I am interested in networking and learning more about open education, open pedagogy, open research and more.  


Monday November 9, 2020 4:00pm - 4:25pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Strategies, Presentation

4:00pm EST

Iterating Stewardship in Open Education: A Discussion with Regional Leaders in Open Education
Regional Leaders in Open Education (RLOE) was launched in 2019 by CCCOER members to explore and articulate issues for Open Education as an emerging profession. Focal areas are professionalism, policy and strategy, sustainability, and stewardship.

Join the RLOE workgroup on stewardship for a lively discussion of key topics that will inform a respectful iteration of the CARE Framework of 2018.

We are not interested in policing the actions of others. Rather, we aim to articulate evolving ideals for good OER stewardship, recognizing that many perspectives and motives make for a healthy field. We approach this discussion with gratitude to the authors of the CARE Framework.

Propositions and questions to be discussed by participants include:

1.Recognizing that labor arrangements sometimes place an inequitable burden on contingent faculty and support staff, how do stewards support and seek appropriate compensation and recognition for creators and collaborators?
2.Recognizing that OER is sometimes embedded in the power structures of those who have traditionally produced and distributed commercialized knowledge, how do stewards encourage contributions by and support for voices of learners who have not been included in commercialized knowledge?
3.Recognizing that openly licensed materials may be re-used in ways that can harm learners, how can stewards consider users’ privacy, and consider the data and surveillance practices of platforms that host OER?
4.Recognizing that learners sometimes are not able to exercise agency with respect to their artifacts and data, how do stewards promote learners’ rights to exercise informed consent around their artifacts and data?

Learning Outcomes:
Participants will:
•Identify emerging concerns around stewardship in Open Education.
•Articulate emerging approaches to enacting good stewardship in Open Education.
•Provide input on the next steps for this iteration of a statement of good stewardship.

Speakers
avatar for James Glapa-Grossklag

James Glapa-Grossklag

Dean, College of the Canyons
James Glapa-Grossklag is the Dean of Educational Technology, Learning Resources, and Distance Learning at College of the Canyons (California, USA). He directs the statewide CCC DECT grant and also co-coordinates Technical Assistance for the CCC Zero Textbook Cost grant program. James... Read More →
avatar for Nathan Smith

Nathan Smith

Professor and OER Coordinator, Houston Community College
avatar for Judith Sebesta

Judith Sebesta

Executive Director, Digital Higher Education Consortium of Texas
avatar for Andrew McKinney

Andrew McKinney

OER Coordinator, CUNY


Monday November 9, 2020 4:00pm - 4:25pm EST
Concurrent 4
  The Field, Presentation

4:00pm EST

A First Time for Everything: Novice Open Educators Take Center Stage with Open Pedagogy Approaches
Open Pedagogy Approaches: Faculty, Library, and Student Collaborations was recently published as a collection of OER case studies highlighting the collaborative work surrounding open educational initiatives. As the book’s release was announced, the editors realized the number of first-time authors, peer-reviewers, and copyeditors as these contributors celebrated their scholarly success through social media. Taking a look back, the presenters aim to highlight the stories of a few “first-timers,” addressing their motivations for getting involved (both in open pedagogy and in the book), the process of the work, and the potential impact that the book holds at their campuses and for their career trajectories.

Open Pedagogy Approaches, in itself, was the focus of a local professional development initiative, as a way to learn about and share models of open pedagogical practices while at the same time skilling up to know how to support future open educational ideas. The editors knew that the small editorial team was learning as they went, but did not realize that the high quality of the contributors’ work also included newcomers to open pedagogy who were also looking to develop their skills.

Panelists will include a sampling of authors, peer reviewers, and copyeditors, along with members of the editorial board.

Learning Outcomes:
Participants will:
- celebrate the exciting initiatives and professional development opportunities of emerging leaders in open education through their contributions in Open Pedagogy Approaches: Faculty, Library, and Student Collaborations
- identify the relationship between open publishing and broader venues to develop professional growth
- generate a working list of models, platforms, and tools to encourage open pedagogy practices

Speakers
avatar for Kim Hoffman

Kim Hoffman

Director of Learning Initiatives, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester
avatar for Moriana Garcia

Moriana Garcia

STEM and Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Rochester
avatar for Louann  Terveer

Louann Terveer

Digital Initiatives and Scholarly Communications Librarian, DeWitt Wallace Library, Macalester College
avatar for Heather Miceli

Heather Miceli

Adjunct Faculty, Roger Williams University
Interests: Open pedagogy in science courses, Adjunct support systems
avatar for Carrie Baldwin-SoRelle

Carrie Baldwin-SoRelle

Social Sciences/Scholarly Communications Librarian, Lehigh University
avatar for Sarah Siddiqui

Sarah Siddiqui

STEM Librarian, University of Rochester


Monday November 9, 2020 4:00pm - 4:55pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Open Education 101, Panel

4:00pm EST

OER for Beginners in Texas and Beyond: Texas Learn OER
Texas Learn OER is a free and openly licensed self-paced training for faculty, staff, and administrators developed by OER Librarian Carrie Gits in partnership with the Digital Higher Education Consortium of Texas (DigiTex). The 10 online modules include information on understanding OER; open licensing, including Creative Commons; finding and evaluating OER; accessibility; adapting, creating, and sharing OER; and Texas legislation related to OER. The modules are intended for individuals who are new to OER, but also by those who want a refresher course. This session will walk participants through the Texas Learn OER modules and provide guidance on remixing the training for your state. The training itself is an example of remixing an existing OER because Carrie Gits originally developed the training for her SPARC Open Education Leadership Fellows capstone project.

Presenters:
Carrie Gits is the creator of Texas Learn OER and the Head Librarian at the Austin Community College (ACC) Highland campus. As the Library Services Open Educational Resources (OER) Facilitator her responsibilities include supporting faculty and librarians through training and information sharing on open education and OER. Carrie was a 2018-2019 SPARC Open Education Leadership Fellow.

Ursula Pike is the Associate Director of the Digital Higher Education Consortium of Texas (DigiTex) which facilitates the use of best practices in technology-enhanced education. She is a member of the Community College Consortium for OER Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Committee.

Learning Outcomes:

Using Texas Learn OER as a backdrop, attendees will be introduced to basic concepts of OER.  Attendees will explore Texas Learn Modules and interact with content. 
  • Learn what open educational resources are
  • Identify how to find and evaluate OER
  • Discover how to adapt, create and share OER
  • Learn how to remix Texas Learn OER for your state
Open Education 101

Speakers
avatar for Carrie Gits

Carrie Gits

Head Librarian, Austin Community College
Head Librarian, Highland Campus Library at Austin Community College. Library Services OER Team Leader.
avatar for Ursula Pike

Ursula Pike

Associate Director, Digital Higher Education Consortium of Texas
I am the Associate Director of the Digital Higher Education Consortium of Texas (DigiTex). I have worked in higher education in Texas for over a decade. As coordinator for Austin Community College’s Open Educational Resources (OER) initiative, I supported OER course options as they... Read More →


Monday November 9, 2020 4:00pm - 4:55pm EST
Concurrent 2
  Open Education 101, Workshop

4:30pm EST

Designing a Modular Statewide Open Education Resource for College Writing
In this session, the authors of Write What Matters, OPAL fellows for the Idaho State Board of Education, share best practices for creating a modular open education resource in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic. We used the state general education outcomes and partnered with the Idaho State Board of Education and Rebus to create a resource in Pressbooks that is open, accessible, and relatable to a variety of audiences including students in first year composition courses, dual credit students, and students in first year experience courses as well as more advanced students in literature and analysis courses. Rather than focusing on an institution-specific resource with a single “voice,” we chose to create a book that incorporated a variety of existing open education resources while also preserving the original authors’ voices. The book is enhanced with H5P exercises, ready-made essay and discussion prompts for instructors, and video resources helpful to students. The book (still in beta form) is available here: https://idaho.pressbooks.pub/write/

We are excited to share what we learned in the process and to explain how OERs like the one we created can benefit students in rural states, especially in times of crisis.


Learning Outcomes:
1. Understand how the modular approach to OER adaption and creation meets a variety of stakeholder needs.
2. Learn about online collaboration tools that are important to successful OER projects, especially in the COVID-19 environment.
3. Appreciate the importance of including diverse voices and experiences in OER content, which benefits students and teachers.

Speakers
avatar for Liza Long

Liza Long

Assistant Professor of English, College of Western Idaho
I'm an assistant professor of English at the College of Western Idaho. My book, The Price of Silence: A Mom's Perspective on Mental Illness, was a 2014 "Books for a Better Life" award winner. 
avatar for Amy Minervini

Amy Minervini

Instructor of English, Lewis-Clark State College
I teach for Lewis-Clark State College as an instructor in the Humanities Division. My passion is teaching rhetoric and composition courses (English 101 & English 102) and helping students to become stronger writers and critical thinkers. I also teach a content methods, intro to literature... Read More →
avatar for Joel Gladd

Joel Gladd

Instructor of English, College of Western Idaho


Monday November 9, 2020 4:30pm - 4:55pm EST
Concurrent 5
  Collaborations, Presentation

4:30pm EST

“That’s not an Issue Here”: Addressing Myths and Misconceptions about OER at Private Institutions
A common misunderstanding about private colleges is that there is no need for affordable course materials such as open educational resources (OER). The Private Academic Library Network of Indiana (PALNI) is a consortium supporting 24 private institutions across Indiana with their OER efforts via the PALSave affordable learning program. Given the higher tuition price tag, isn't the cost of textbooks just a drop in the bucket? PALNI has encountered this challenging misconception in its efforts to educate faculty about OER. Drawing from recent literature, national data, results from PALNI’s pilot student textbook survey, and further anecdotal evidence gathered from PALNI Affordable Learning participants, this presentation aims to dispel this myth. This session will demonstrate that students at private institutions are quite concerned with and negatively affected by the costs of textbooks, and that many of their faculty are in fact receptive to lowering textbook costs in pursuit of increased student success, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.



Learning Outcomes:
Identify the myths and misconceptions about OER at private institutions.
Explore the financial situation private school students face.
Learn about real-world applications of OER programs at private institutions.
Understand the need for OER programs at private institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Hurford

Amanda Hurford

Scholarly Communications Director, Private Academic Library Network Of Indiana (PALNI)
avatar for Erin Milanese

Erin Milanese

Affordable Learning Project Coordinator/Head of Learning Technologies, PALNI/Goshen College
avatar for Jennifer Coronado

Jennifer Coronado

Scholarly Communication Librarian, Butler University Libraries


Monday November 9, 2020 4:30pm - 4:55pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Open Education 101, Presentation

4:30pm EST

Reimagining Inclusive Design/Policies with OER & Open Pedagogy: Going Beyond Affordability
Open Educational Resources (OER) and Open Pedagogy have been shown to increase affordability, credit hours taken, and other issues related to retention. However, faculty and administrators often do not think of these resources as a part of the solution to address more systematic equities. Administrators, in particular, often do not consider drafting policy to include OER in campus initiatives beyond affordability.
Anti-Racism, Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice are at the forefront of our societal conscience as we navigate these turbulent times. Many institutions of higher education are placing requirements for training, change, and accountability in addressing these issues within their educational communities. This discussion will lead participants through examples showing how OER and Open Pedagogy can be incorporated in this important work. Specific examples of initiatives being engaged at two different academic institutions will include drafting OER into a campus-wide Inclusive Excellence Action Plan and innovative training workshops for faculty. These examples will provide the foundation for discussion. Participants will have access to materials that will help them plan and develop policy and/or training for their own institution.


Learning Outcomes:
Participants will...
Identify examples of how Open Educational Resources (OER) and Open Pedagogical approaches facilitate diverse and inclusive course materials

Identify methods for incentifying faculty to evaluate their own courses for diversity, inclusion, and anti-racism issues

Identify examples of how policy can help frame Open Educational Resources to include diversity, inclusion, and anti-racism goals



Speakers
avatar for CJ Ivory

CJ Ivory

Assistant Professor & Librarian, University of West Georgia
CJ Ivory is Assistant Professor and Learning & Research Support Librarian at the University of West Georgia where she teaches Information Literacy & Research. She also serves as a campus liaison for Affordable Learning Georgia, a statewide initiative to support the implementation... Read More →
avatar for Dawn (Nikki) Cannon-Rech

Dawn (Nikki) Cannon-Rech

Librarian AC, Georgia Southern University Libraries
Research services librarian and liaison to College of Science and Mathematics.
avatar for TaJuan Wilson

TaJuan Wilson

Associate Vice President, Inclusive Excellence and Chief Diversity Officer, Georgia Southern University
Dr. TaJuan R. Wilson is a 14 year higher education administrator. Dr. Wilson earned a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Communications (2007), a Master of Public Administration with an emphasis in Government Management (2009), and a Doctorate of Education with an emphasis... Read More →


Monday November 9, 2020 4:30pm - 4:55pm EST
Concurrent 4
  Social Justice, Presentation

5:00pm EST

Open for Who?: Assessing the Accessibility of Open Textbooks
Proponents of open educational resources are quick to tout how they are accessible for everyone, but this definition of accessible means they are simply free. It does not include making OERs accessible so that anyone with a disability can still consume them. As the open education community seeks to reimagine itself, then we need to ensure that we include everyone. This presentation will discuss a research project that seeks to determine to what extent open textbooks on average meet a number of accessibility criteria based on the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG). WCAG guidelines are an important standard for all online content creators and providers to work toward as they help ensure that disabled consumers can use and interact with online content. The presentation will discuss the results of the evaluation, including the problems most commonly found and which broad categories books were most and least likely to do well in. The presentation will help anyone involved with open textbook creation and adaptation determine where they can focus their efforts to ensure open textbooks are truly accessible for all. The data will also help to establish a baseline for the accessibility of open textbooks that the community can use to assess its own work toward making all open textbooks accessible.


Learning Outcomes:
Participants will: Understand how well open textbooks meet various online accessibility standards and discuss ways to incorporate this knowledge into their work

Speakers
avatar for Teresa Schultz

Teresa Schultz

Social Sciences Librarian, University of Nevada, Reno
Prior to becoming Social Sciences Librarian, Teresa served as Copyright and Scholarly Communications Librarian at UNR, where she still provides copyright education. Her first career was in journalism.
avatar for Elena Azadbakht

Elena Azadbakht

Health Sciences Librarian, University of Nevada, Reno


Monday November 9, 2020 5:00pm - 5:25pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Challenges, Presentation

5:00pm EST

Design for Open: Strategies and Processes
In this session, participants will learn about the different roles that instructional designers, faculty course developers, and other education professionals can play in the advocacy and promotion of OER and open eduction practices. Example course development templates that utilize OER will be reviewed. This session will also provide a definition of open education practices, what the advantages of these practices might be, and review strategies for including open education processes into the curriculum. Resources and lesson plans that utilize OEP will be shared and discussed. There will be an opportunity for participants to share their own work and practice as well as time for questions.

Learning Outcomes:
Participants in this session will be able to:
• Identify the different roles that instructional designers and faculty course developers can play in the advocacy for OER and open practices,
• Understand how to connect OER to the learning design process using course design templates,
• Identify open strategies that can be applied to course development that promote student engagement and ownership of their learning.

Speakers
avatar for Geoff Cain

Geoff Cain

Consultant, GBC Education Consulting
Geoff Cain is an education consultant who is currently working with the Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges on instructional design projects. He has previously taught English and Adult Basic Education in the community colleges. He has just finished his third... Read More →


Monday November 9, 2020 5:00pm - 5:25pm EST
Concurrent 4
  Open Education 101, Presentation

5:00pm EST

Generating OER Conversations on Your Campus
Is Open Education a relatively new concept on your campus? Are you interested in kicking off fruitful conversations about OER among faculty, students, and other stakeholders, but don’t know where to start? This presentation will describe three low-stakes ideas for introducing OER in a university setting and for beginning to develop a local community of Open Education supporters and practitioners. While the ideas presented are based on events hosted at Gonzaga University in 2019-2020, suggestions for adapting them to your own institution and to an online environment will also be shared.

Learning Outcomes:
At the end of this session, attendees should be able to: 1) Articulate the benefits of creating campus conversations around OER; 2) Develop ideas for starting OER conversations at their own institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Shayna Pekala

Shayna Pekala

Scholarly Communication Librarian, Gonzaga University


Monday November 9, 2020 5:00pm - 5:25pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Open Education 101, Presentation

5:00pm EST

Rapid Open Adoption: Co-Constructing an Open, Active STEM Textbook with Students
In Spring of 2020 the University of Washington moved all courses to emergency remote. Many struggled, or doubled-down on existing, closed practices. Many further closed their courses through proprietary software, or proctored exams.


We tell a different story. Dr. Jennifer White opened her Endocrinology course to co-constructing an open textbook with students, starting from course materials and notes created by Dr. Moon Draper, the previous teacher of the course. Dr. White made the transition to open pedagogy and open textbooks with very little prior experience. After the Spring Quarter, her course transition was rated by students as being the best rapid transition to online in the UW Biology department.


In the Summer Quarter, Dr. White ran the course again, with Peter Wallis joining her as a researcher. Together we ran several open pedagogy design experiments. Our goal was to develop assignments teachers can use to make a rapid transition to open pedagogy, co-constructing open textbooks with students, in keeping with what we already know about high structure active learning.


We are in the process of writing up our research, drawn from assignment data, focus group feedback, and student surveys. We would like to tell you the story of our course, strengthen the evidence that it’s possible for teachers with little background to rapidly transition to open pedagogical and open educational practices, and share assignment and course designs you can use in your context, to open education to all.

Learning Outcomes:
Together, build a brief guide to rapid open education adoption. To accomplish this:


Review challenges & opportunities moving from in-person teaching to co-constructing an open textbook online in the COVID-19 crisis


Explore the possibility of rapid open education transformation through a real life case study


Analyze assignment designs & review student feedback


Select specific assignment designs participants can use to help students co-create Open Educational Resources

Speakers
avatar for Peter Wallis

Peter Wallis

Director, Learning Systems and Assessment, The University of Washington
My broad research background includes neuroscience, big data, active learning. All of these have led me to believe that students and teachers can co-create learning materials, and that this approach, when well-implemented, is better for learners. I'm now applying design research methods... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer White

Jennifer White

Lecturer, University of Washington


Monday November 9, 2020 5:00pm - 5:25pm EST
Concurrent 2
  Practices, Presentation

5:00pm EST

#HonouringIndigenousWriters: Engaging Communities in Transforming Wikipedia
In December 2015 Daniel Heath Justice began a Twitter campaign to share the names of Indigenous writers. The reason for his efforts was to: "...push back against the frequent assumptions that our literary history is any less complex, robust, or diverse than that of other peoples" (Daniel Heath Justice, Why Indigenous Literatures Matter?, p.298).
In solidarity with his efforts, in 2018 a group of interested individuals from the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program, UBC Library, and the Centre for Teaching and Learning Technology at the University of British Columbia came together to develop the first #HonouringIndigenousWriters Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon.

Wikipedia is a multilingual, web-based, free encyclopedia based on a model of open community-generated knowledge. The community-driven nature of Wikipedia is meant to support Wikipedia’s goal of providing “…every single person on the planet is given free access to the sum of all human knowledge” (Wikipedia, Prime Objective, para 1). However, well documented systematic bias including information gaps, exclusions, diversity of articles and editors, and assumptions about neutrality and notability, greatly impacts the information that can be found in an information source with millions of views per day.

The #HonouringIndigenousWriters Wikipedia Edit-a-thon was seeking to:
  • build a partnership that would increase the visibility of Indigenous writers in Wikipedia;
  • engage the community in open practices using Wikipedia;
  • improve the quality of Indigenous writers Wikipedia pages;
  • ensure the planning processes and practices work in good faith with the Indigenous writers identified for article editing.

In 2019, the edit-a thon expanded to include satellite events in other post secondary institutions, educational organizations, and a public library. We are currently adapting an online version of the event for 2021.

This session will detail the process of developing an experience for participants that aligned with the social justice principles of open pedagogy- that of the collaborative, transparent, and open creation of knowledge for the improvement of an openly accessible information source. The session will outline the process of creating the event, how the design of the event focused on principles of good faith, and the ways that participation from diverse communities highlighted complimentary but unique interests in engaging with open knowledge creation.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Describe the value and importance of engaging diverse communities in open practices.

2. Describe the value and importance of improving and diversifying open information systems.

2. Find and apply resources for planning an #HonouringIndigenousWriters Wikipedia Edit-a-thon at your own institution.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Fields

Erin Fields

Open Education & Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of British Columbia
UBC
avatar for Donna Langille

Donna Langille

Community Engagement Librarian, University of British Columbia Okanagan


Monday November 9, 2020 5:00pm - 5:25pm EST
Concurrent 5
  Social Justice, Presentation

5:30pm EST

Tea Time
"Tea time" is a break in scheduled programming when attendees can rest, practice self-care, or dive into networking or asynchronous sessions. There is no scheduled programming during this time.

If you choose, here is a set of themed lightning talks to consider. So, grab a favorite beverage and tune in to these short presentations. Feel free to take the conversation to Discord and share your thoughts with others.

Talk Politics?
​​Cracking the Disciplines Open: How I'm Bringing Open Into Political Science, and Why You Should Consider Cracking Your Field Open, Too​​​​​​
Attenuated Democracy: A New OER Textbook for U.S. Government Courses​​​

Monday November 9, 2020 5:30pm - 5:55pm EST
Break
  Community Connections, Break

6:00pm EST

Opening Reception
Monday November 9, 2020 6:00pm - 6:55pm EST
All Together
  Community Connections, Conversation

7:00pm EST

Late Show
Each day will end with an informal conversation with the organizers and members of the conference community. The Late Show will debrief the day so far, provide tips on what’s ahead, and opportunities to get to know different perspectives in the field.

The theme for the first day of the conference is introduction to Open Education, and we’ll wrap up the first day experience with some reflection and a conversation with two young professionals who bring a student advocacy perspective.

Tune into the Zoom meeting to participate!

Speakers
avatar for Hailey Babb

Hailey Babb

Open Education Coordinator, SPARC
avatar for David Draper

David Draper

Vice President Academic, University of Alberta Students' Union
Talk to me about Student Advocacy and university governance!

Planners
avatar for Emily Ragan

Emily Ragan

Associate Professor, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Excited about reimagining effective education. Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and OER Coordinator at Metropolitan State University of Denver


Monday November 9, 2020 7:00pm - 7:25pm EST
All Together
  Community Connections, Conversation

7:30pm EST

Collaborative Creation between Librarians and English Faculty: Communication and Planning for OER Textbooks
Collaborations between libraries and academic departments can provide the synergistic energies needed to develop and adopt OER texts on a programmatic level. The key to success for such collaborations is to make sure that the interests of both parties are represented, and to understand that different groups may have interests that do not overlap. By identifying and acknowledging the variety of interests at play in collaborative OER projects, authors and creators can increase engagement with and adoption of OER textbooks.

This presentation explores how an interdisciplinary collaboration between an English department and university library resulted in a composition and information literacy OER that was successfully launched in a freshman composition course. By considering the needs and interests of both groups, the OER creators were able to achieve outcomes that their respective organizations found meaningful and which enhanced support for OER adoption.

In the English department the author was interested in creating a flexible and multi-formatted teaching text. In the library, the authors believed an OER textbook could be designed to support and reinforce efforts to embed information literacy into the composition curriculum. Authors from both areas wanted to lower textbook cost for students. Given that the text is used in first-year writing courses, the authors worked diligently to create a textbook that met each of these goals, and that was accessible to all and allowed for equitable access to the content material. Through that process, they discovered that cross-curricular collaborations improve both access and affordability.

This presentation will focus on the lessons learned through that collaborative process that inform the revision of the OER in future iterations. Audience members will learn about the planning and communication consideration that can positively impact collaborations across departments.

Learning Outcomes: Audience member will:

- identify strategies for planning between departments in order to collaborate effectively to create OER textbooks
- recognize how to communicate about different goals for collaborators in order to increase departmental satisfaction and OER success

Speakers
avatar for Sarah LeMire

Sarah LeMire

First Year Experience and Outreach Librarian, Texas A&M University Libraries
Sarah LeMire is the First Year Experience and Outreach Librarian at Texas A&M University. She is interested in information literacy instruction, assessment, scalability of instruction and outreach, and outreach to special populations, especially veterans.
avatar for Kathy Anders

Kathy Anders

Assistant Professor - Graduate Studies Librarian, Texas A&M University
avatar for Terri Pantuso

Terri Pantuso

Instructional Assistant Professor, Coordinator of Freshman Composition, Texas A&M University
My professional interests include ELA pedagogy, online writing, assessment, maternal studies, and American women writers.


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Open Education 101, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Creating an OER: 101
Step-by-step guide on OER development with an opportunity to ask questions at the end of the presentation.

Learning Outcomes: Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this module, participants will acquire the following skills:

Participants will be able to identify and locate at least three OER resources.
Participants will gain a broad understanding of content mapping of a module or course.
Participants will be able to apply basic knowledge of reviewing their own learning objectives to determine which OER content is appropriate for their course or module.
Participants will practice and apply kno

Speakers
avatar for Dr. R. Ann O'Connor

Dr. R. Ann O'Connor

Associate Professor of Communication, Ivy Tech Community College


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Open Education 101, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Creating Open Resources: An Example
This session focuses on a single journey to create a robust set of lecture slides and lecture video for an introductory astronomy course, focusing less on the material itself and more on the process of developing open educational resources (OER) from existing lecture material. The intention is to help highlight the process for anyone else who has thought about contributing to the growing collection of OER worldwide but wasn't sure what considerations should go into that development.

Learning Outcomes: This session is aimed at educators who may be interested in creating open resources but do not know where to start. Goals: 1) identify the steps needed to create robust resources, 2) examine obstacles or pitfalls to avoid, and 3) determine what to do with the completed product.

Speakers
avatar for Lauren Woolsey

Lauren Woolsey

Assistant Professor and OER Coordinator, Grand Rapids Community College


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Open Education 101, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Leading by Example: "Opening up" Library Tutorials
In this lightning talk, we will explain how we transitioned from the abstract to the concrete by turning our OER advocacy into OER creation. We will outline the decision-making process and workflow model behind converting our existing Information Literacy tutorials into an OER eBook: The Niagara College Libraries + Learning Commons Information Skills Online Handbook (https://ecampusontario.pressbooks.pub/ncinfoskills/).

The initial goal of our project was to demonstrate to our faculty that OER creation should not be feared. By demonstrating through example, we became more than just promoters of OER (our traditional role as librarians); we became creators of OER - a process which offered us insight into the faculty experience, and provided us with the lived experience necessary to be confident in our dealings with faculty who are looking to become fledgling OER authors themselves.

Learning Outcomes: Participants will be able to:
-evaluate their existing institutional material/resources for its potential as an OER
-formulate a manageable process to convert their existing material to OER
-articulate how to begin OER creation

Speakers
avatar for Jaclyn Chambers Page

Jaclyn Chambers Page

Library Facilitator: Information Literacy, Niagara College Canada
avatar for Siscoe Boschman

Siscoe Boschman

Library Facilitator: Information Literacy, Niagara College Canada


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Open Education 101, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Learning About Open Educational Resources
This gallery will showcase the use of a rapid authoring tool to create interactive, multimedia-rich, mobile-friendly OER content. Although there are many tools to create OER content, the tool presented provides for a very low learning curve.

Learning Outcomes: Are you looking to educate your audience about OER? How about a way to create responsive OER content that adapts to any device size? What about a way to gather feedback while creating your OER content?

This session will demonstrate OER content created using a rapid authoring tool. By the end of the session, participants will have reviewed an OER course designed to increase the participants' awareness about OER.

Please take a moment to complete the course evaluation. Your cooperation and feedback is greatly appreciated.https://form.jotform.com/michaelporter/loera-evaluation

Speakers
avatar for Michael L. Porter

Michael L. Porter

Web Services Librarian, Lawson State Community College
Michael currently serves as the Web Services Librarian and liaison to the Business and Computer Science Departments, the Honors College, and our eCollege for Distance Education. In this role, Michael works to integrate Library resources and services into course management software... Read More →


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Open Education 101, Showcase Gallery

7:30pm EST

Off to a Roaring Start: Successes and Lessons from Year One of OER and Textbook Affordability Initiatives"
In 2018, the state higher education commission offered a series of informational programs to increase awareness and adoption of OER in colleges and universities. This spurred our university to include OER as part of the current strategic plan and to form a working group to create a sustainable program of OER education and adoption on campus. At the same time, the library was prioritizing the purchase of textbooks and other course material to increase both physical and electronic course reserves to help ease the burden of textbook costs for students.
In this session, the presenters, one a librarian who is a member of the OER working group and the other the University Librarian who made TAI a priority, will discuss how they combined their efforts to support the launch of a faculty stipend program that includes money not just for traditional OER but also leverages library resources and fair use guidelines to support textbook affordability.
This program, launched in May of 2020 has funded 15 projects to date, some using adoption/adaption/creation of OER, some using course reserves and e-resources, and some using a combination of OER and library resources.
Though this first year has exceeded our expectations, we also learned lessons and adapted the program as we went along to better meet the needs of the students, faculty, and administration. We will discuss these lessons learned and how we plan to continue to refine and improve our program over the course of the next year.

Learning Outcomes: After attending this session, participants will be able to utilize the research and information shared in order to scaffold a similar program at their institution.

Attendees will understand potential issues that may impact the success of their programs and will be able to avoid them.

Participants will be be able to advocate at their institution for a similar program.

Speakers
avatar for Derek Malone

Derek Malone

University Librarian, University of North Alabama
Derek Malone is the University Librarian at the University of North Alabama.
avatar for Jennifer L. Pate

Jennifer L. Pate

Open Education Resources (OER) & Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of North Alabama


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Open Education 101, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Starting OER: Advocacy and Promotion
As a librarian who was new to OER responsibilities, it was important to raise awareness on campus and support OER Champions… but where do you start? In this session, I discuss the ways that I have found helpful to advertise, promote, and advocate for Open Educational Resources (OER). As with all endeavors, there are successes and roadblocks which will be covered in this talk. The lessons I learned and can be applied to K-12 and academic libraries.

Learning Outcomes: Participants will learn about ways in which they easily promote and collaborate with others on Open Educational Resources (OER) from direct contact to events.

Speakers
avatar for Ruth Monnier

Ruth Monnier

Learning Outreach Librarian, Assistant Professor, Pittsburg State University


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Open Education 101, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Thinking about Adapting a Textbook? Tips We Learned Along the Way
The cost of textbooks and higher education continues to rise. Students face no-win decisions between expensive textbooks and basic needs. In order to disrupt this situation, faculty and students are driving the development of open-access textbooks and instructional materials.

But where do you begin with creating an open textbook? As instructors of a Critical Thinking in Academic Research course, we wanted an open-access textbook and up-to-date ancillary materials that met the flexibility of the content covered in class. While we used a wide variety of web sites to support the course content, a single textbook that covered all aspects of the course eluded us. Open access information literacy content was not hard to find, however the critical thinking components were best handled by a commercial textbook.

We surveyed our students and listened to their requests for a low cost or free textbook. We decided it was time to take the leap and create something of our own. At that time we were using both an open-access textbook focused on information literacy and a commercial critical thinking textbook. Ultimately we decided not to reinvent the wheel, but to adapt the open access book and dig deep to find a comparable critical thinking open textbook with the content needed to balance the research information.

We will share how we got our project started. We’ll describe what we knew, what we didn’t, how we planned our project, and how to overcome hurdles that pop up along the way.

Learning Outcomes: 1. Discuss the realistic picture and timetable for adapting textbooks

2. Identify the practical steps for online textbook collaboration

Speakers
avatar for Robin Ewing

Robin Ewing

Assessment Librarian, St. Cloud State University
avatar for Cindy Gruwell

Cindy Gruwell

Assistant Librarian/Coordinator of Scholarly Communication, University of West Florida


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Open Education 101, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

An Open Annotated Bibliography Case Study
Some academic fields have a wealth of resources that are available online for free, but are not openly licensed. These resources can be leveraged for course materials and for development of open textbooks and open educational resources (OER) through open annotated bibliographies. In this case study I present my selection of assigned reading material for a college course on soil and water conservation. Potential options included three commercial textbooks or an assortment of alternative reading assignments in place of a conventional textbook. I chose to use alternative reading assignments, which include extension publications, government reports, and other similar free and credible resources available online. This led to the creation of Soil and Water Conservation: An Annotated Bibliography. An overview of the annotated bibliography development, content, and classroom use is presented. Soil and Water Conservation: An Annotated Bibliography serves as an example of an alternative approach for developing open textbooks and OER that enhance education while leveraging existing resources that may or may not be openly licensed. Further information is available in the case study recently published in the journal, Natural Sciences Education (Moorberg, 2020). Questions and answers related to this case study will be facilitated throughout the conference via email and Twitter using the hashtag #OpenSoilWaterCon and my Twitter handle, @ColbyDigsSoil.

Learning Outcomes: Audience members will 1) review the development and implementation of an open annotated bibliography, 2) learn the advantages of using open annotated bibliographies, 3) understand how to use open annotated bibliographies to facilitate effective student-led discussions, and 4) observe an example of using OER-enabled pedagogy to collaborate with students on textbook development.

Speakers
avatar for Colby Moorberg

Colby Moorberg

Assistant Professor of Soil Science, Kansas State University


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Practices, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Assess at the Speed of Learning
Assess at the Speed of Learning. This poster session will provide you access to open education websites where you can access free resources to create, adopt, adapt, and share learning outcomes assessment tasks and instruments. The tools included allow attendees to get started searching free, expertly created assessments you can use in your own courses. The tools are easy to use and allow the user to create, adopt, adapt, or share assessments using simulations, quizzes, interactive discussions, rubrics, games, and more. All resources presented are usable in face-to-face or virtual learning experiences. The resources provided include assessment tasks and instruments that are searchable by discipline. If you are looking for a place to get you and your students excited about the possibilities assessing learning, this is the session for you.

Learning Outcomes: Create, adopt, adapt, or share student learning outcomes assessment tasks and assessment instruments using open education practice.

Speakers
avatar for Carla Rossiter-Smith

Carla Rossiter-Smith

Dean of Institutional Effectiveness, Pasco-Hernando State College
Carla Rossiter-Smith has a decade of experience working in assessment and institutional research in higher education. Her experience includes presentations at national and local conferences and participation in national working groups on data systems and accountability. Ms. Rossiter-Smith... Read More →


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Practices, Showcase Gallery

7:30pm EST

Creating a Health Assessment Open Resource for a Nursing Program and Beyond
The use of electronic open educational resource that is linked directly to the students' learning management system offer ease of use and easy access for students. The high cost associated with the use of textbooks in nursing education is ameliorated by the use of open educational resources. Health assessment is a basic skill by all health professionals, including nurses. This body of knowledge is readily available from many open resources. There was an effort to use and modify available resources in health assessment that will fit the objectives of a health assessment course in most nursing programs. Furthermore, this open resources is continually developed by nurse educators and nurses as they continue to use this resource in their practice.

This session will include a poster presentation and illustration of open content, design and samples from a learning management system.

Learning Outcomes: Participants will:
1. explore issues around adopting open educational resources as references in nursing programs
2. discuss strategies to advocate for students' use of open educational resources in nursing programs
3. analyze course design and teaching strategies around an open textbook in health assessment

This is the link to the presentation: https://sway.office.com/4LG6reHXpTHEWST0?ref=Link

Speakers
avatar for Raquel Bertiz

Raquel Bertiz

Faculty, Maryland Clinical Simulation Resource Consortium
avatar for Ching-Chuen Feng

Ching-Chuen Feng

Professor, Nursing Program, Montgomery College


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Practices, Showcase Gallery

7:30pm EST

Designing an OER Advocacy Infographic
A demonstration of how to quickly design, using Canva, an openly-licensed infographic to use for OER advocacy at your campus/organization.

Learning Outcomes: Learn how to design an OER Advocacy One-Pager

Speakers
avatar for Judith Sebesta

Judith Sebesta

Executive Director, Digital Higher Education Consortium of Texas


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Practices, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

High Quality Figures for an OER Course in Chemistry on Libretexts
Preparing for teaching remotely, I had the task of turning 300 existing slides that contained copyrighted figures into an open educational resource. The goal was to find figures with a Creative Commons license that would be as good or better than the ones I had been using. I will describe ways of searching for existing figures with appropriate license, ways that work for domains other than chemistry as well. In the second part of the talk, I will share techniques of making high-quality figures from scratch, specifically in the chemistry/biochemistry domain.

Learning Outcomes: 1) Search for existing figures with appropriate license for remixing
2) Create custom figures for the chemistry/biochemistry domain

Speakers
avatar for Karsten Theis

Karsten Theis

Assoc. Professor of Biochemistry, Westfield State University


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Practices, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Journeys through OER: Past, Present, and Future Adventures and Understandings
The presentation will be a 10-minute video with slides, images, and narrative/audio. In our video, we will explore our own journeys as users and developers of open educational resources. Examples of past and potential future renewable assignments and tools used for implementation will be included.

We will begin our session with a look of where we began: two members of the original OpenEd Fellows cohort (2015-16) who had limited experience with OER but were excited about learning more and meeting others who had a similar passion. Along the way, we were exposed to the issues, problems, and the status of open education and started thinking as an instructional designer and instructor, what can we do? Since meeting at OpenEd, we have collaborated on multiple conference presentations, open pedagogy projects, and a manuscript (published in 2019).

Our interest started with a simple change for easing financial hardship due to the textbook cost issue—adopt an open textbook. Over time, we moved to implementing open pedagogy by changing disposable assignments to renewable/non-disposable assignments. Each semester we tried to improve the experiences for both teaching and learning. Along the way, we did a few pieces of research that helped us have a better understanding of students’ experience and preferences regarding the textbook selection and non-disposable assignments. What was not reported in our findings about textbook selection was our own growth as an instructor and instructional designer. In our session, we will focus on the energy it took to create, implement, assess, and redesign the assignments we created, the collaboration needed between the two of us to make this work, and suggestions and recommendations based on what worked and what didn’t.

Our goal is to help others by being transparent with our own journeys. Our story is particularly relevant to this year’s conference theme, as we see our collaboration as an intersection between multiple dimensions of ourselves: we are in two different roles (instructor and instructional designer) at very different institutions half-way across the United States.

We will discuss our past collaborations--including celebrations and challenges--and how we will move forward in a time of increased emphasis on remote/online learning. This evolution will be crucial both as individuals and as a field, as we continue to move forward with rapid pedagogical shifts and changes during an unprecedented time.

Learning Outcomes: After this session, attendees will have a better grasp of and appreciation for the effects one's journey has on developing and using open materials and assignments. Understanding our journeys are key to understanding our pasts—and futures—as champions and users of OER. By opening up and examining our experiences of growth and setbacks thus far, we are more self-aware and can imagine how we might evolve as individuals and a community in the open education field.

Speakers
avatar for Feng-Ru Sheu

Feng-Ru Sheu

instructional design librarian, Kent State University
avatar for Judy Orton Grissett

Judy Orton Grissett

Director of Experiential Learning and Associate Professor of Psychology, Georgia Southwestern State University


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Practices, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

An Examination of the Impact of Affordable Learning Georgia Textbook Transformation Project on Instruction, Learning, and Student Achievement
The core goal of this project is to provide our students with quality and affordable MATH 1111 College course. In particular, this project enabled the provision of a no-cost textbook course for all our College Algebra Students at Albany State University.

Albany State University is a senior unit of the University System of Georgia (USG). USG encourages faculty members to apply and receive the Affordable Learning Textbook Transformation Grants which enable them to develop resources as well as utilize Open Education Resources (OER) for course instruction. In most cases, these courses are zero-cost textbook courses, whereby every student in the class has access to an ebook. The ebook is usually reposed on the course learning platform (GeorgiaView).

This state-wide grant has saved students millions of Dollars. In this presentation, we discuss the data collected on such grant activities on three distinct courses which have led to positive outcomes.

Learning Outcomes:
  1. To eliminate the cost of textbook and other course-related materials to students by providing no-cost course materials, software, and an online free textbook.
  2. To improve student engagement in learning of College Algebra, and enhance student success and achievement
  3. To motivate student interest in the use of online-based technology in the solution of real-life problems
  4. To create a standardized online College Algebra by incorporating innovative strategies incluidng pedagogy

Speakers
avatar for Zephyrinus Okonkwo

Zephyrinus Okonkwo

Professor of Mathematics, Albany State University


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Strategies, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Introducing The Open Pipeline
The foundation of open education advocacy work is building relationships; open education advocates work with their colleagues as they begin their journey from non open to open and ideally stay with them each step of the way. Progress exists but it is sometimes hard to measure as adoption statistics only tell part of the story.

To help track and ensure the progression of each phase of the open education journey, the pipeline, a productivity tool used in the sales world, is applied to open education initiatives. Come learn about the five stages of the open pipeline to determine if it could be a useful tool for measuring and sustaining open education progress at your institution.

Learning Outcomes: By the end of this lightning talk the learner will be able to name the 5 stages of the open pipeline and be able to apply this tool to the open education initiative at their own institution.

Speakers
avatar for Ross McKerlich

Ross McKerlich

Open Education Advisor, BCcampus
Open Education Advisor & Regional Representative for the interior.I support open education initiatives in six post secondary institutions in the interior of British Columbia. I also work collaboratively with the learning & teaching team and special projects team at BCcampus.  


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Strategies, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Publishing Reimagined: An Overview of OER Publishing Services at the University of Texas at Arlington
This YouTube playlist about the open educational resources (OER) publishing program at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) Libraries features interviews with stakeholders in the OER creation pipeline, including OER creators, librarians, and printing and distribution partners. UTA Libraries believe education should be available to everyone, which means supporting the creation of free, open, and accessible course materials. We provide access to and support for using open source tools to create and disseminate OER. We prioritize eliminating as many barriers to OER use as possible, so we offer training and technical services for transitioning existing open content into an editable format, licensing and attributing content to abide by legal and ethical reuse expectations, providing content in multiple format options (e.g., web, PDF, EPUB, optional hard copies), and indexing OER in open repositories. We are also actively committed to increasing the accessibility and usability of OER by providing accessibility evaluations, trainings, and assistance with content remediation as necessary.

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Reed

Michelle Reed

Director of Open Educational Resources, University of Texas at Arlington
I lead efforts to support the adoption, adaptation, and creation of OER and advocate for the creation of experiential learning opportunities that foster collaboration, increase engagement, and empower students as content creators.
avatar for Jasmine Bridges

Jasmine Bridges

OER Coordinator, University of Texas at Arlington


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Strategies, Showcase Gallery

7:30pm EST

Systematic Planning for Educating and Attitude Changing Events and Initiatives on OER
In this session, we will present how we plan a series of events (webinars and workshops) to inform, educate and encourage language teaching faculty to both use and create OER in their teaching, especially for those who are teaching less commonly taught languages (LCTLs). We will also share our actual experiences in this process--what worked and what did not as planned.


We are a center that provides both instructional support and professional development for language teaching faculty and AIs at a big research university. We found ourselves constantly making decisions on copyright issues in terms of providing audio and video services. Especially after courses are moved online, we feel the pressing need of educating our faculty on both the use and creation of OER. A large range of languages are offered at this university and many of them are so rarely taught that it is only offered in this university (within the U.S.). Few digital learning materials are available for these languages. We hope to encourage our faculty in creating high quality digital learning materials and to share them in proper ways. Creative Commons licenses are a valuable tool for such sharing. However, while search for such resources is easy, proper use (with attribution, for example) requires some serious training. When it comes to assigning a CC license to OER to be shared, it is even more challenging and complicated. We will cover the topics of Creative Commons Licenses, OER and OER-enabled pedagogy. We also plan to identify financial resources to engage LCTL instructors to create and share OER resources.


There is a lot to cover so we have come up with a sequence of teaching these concepts. We will share the sequence of events both during presentation and in the form of a shared document. While teaching key concepts is a must, empowering an attitude change is a bigger challenge. We will present how we identify challenges and opportunities at the university we work and how to address these in the series of events.


Limitation: We have just completed the planning for the first event so we will not be able to complete the full series of events before the conference, which means we will not be able to share a lot of actual experiences. However, since the planning stage is critical, we believe we have a lot of valuable thoughts and experiences to share.

Learning Outcomes: -The attendees will be able to tell the procedures and different aspects of planning a series of events and projects that inform and educate instructors how to use and share OER, as well as motivate instructors in such practices.
-The attendees will be able to learn experiences from carrying out the above plan.
-The attendees will have a template to start with for themselves to engage in such planning and organization of the planned events and initiatives.
-The attendees will get inspired.

Speakers
avatar for Xiaojing Kou

Xiaojing Kou

Director, Center for Language Technology, Indiana University, Bloomington
avatar for Rebecca Ramsey

Rebecca Ramsey

Audio/Video Specialist, Indiana University Center for Language Technology


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Strategies, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Taking Over OER: Evolving an Established OER Program
In this presentation, two research and instruction librarians will present specific tips and tricks of taking over an established OER university program. They will present on communication and marketing strategies, developing an OER Mini Grant website, new program ideas, and designing OER workshops for other UNCG librarians. We will also talk through challenges faced and ideas for future improvements, such as incorporating copyright workshops into the OER Mini Grant requirements. And lastly, we’ll talk about ideas to get teaching faculty and librarians to contribute OER materials back into repositories.

Learning Outcomes: Participants will learn how an OER grant program is implemented through marketing, workshops, cross-campus collaborations, and faculty outreach. In addition, participants will get practical advice on how to evolve an existing OER program based on the experiences of two librarians who took over OER initiatives at their library.

Speakers
avatar for Sam Harlow

Sam Harlow

Online Learning Librarian and Assistant Professor, UNC Greensboro Libraries
avatar for Melody Rood

Melody Rood

Student Success Librarian and Assistant Professor, UNC Greensboro


Monday November 9, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Strategies, Lightning Talk
 
Tuesday, November 10
 

9:00am EST

Join Discord
Click the "Video Stream" button above from your logged in account to join our Discord space! Discord is a private server where conference participants can engage in text and video conversations. It's organized into a series of channels with different themes, and you can share pictures, links, and reactions. If you've ever used Slack, it might feel familiar. But there are several features of Discord that make it a great place to gather.

We encourage you to give it a try!


Tuesday November 10, 2020 9:00am - 9:30am EST
Discord
  Community Connections, Activity

9:00am EST

Welcome Desk
Welcome to the 2020 Open Education Conference! We're so pleased that you're joining us, and we hope you have a wonderful virtual experience.

The Welcome Desk & Virtual Lounge will be open all day. Stop in with questions, comments, or just to say hello.

During breaks, there will be open breakout rooms that you can enter to connect with other attendees. If you've downloaded Zoom 5.3+, you'll be able to see who's hanging out in breakout rooms and be able to "choose your own" to chit chat with others.

If you're here looking for help, here's a few additional resources you might find helpful:
You can also reach us in the following ways:

Tuesday November 10, 2020 9:00am - 6:00pm EST
All Together
  Community Connections, Help
  • Session Type Help
  • Session Delivery Live
  • Captioning n/a

9:30am EST

Early Show
Each day will start with an informal conversation with the organizers and members of the conference community. The Early Show will provide a look at the day ahead, highlights so far, and opportunities to get to know different members of the community. Tune into the Zoom meeting to participate!

Planners
avatar for Stephanie Pierce

Stephanie Pierce

Head, Physics Library, University of Arkansas
avatar for Winni Zhang

Winni Zhang

Open Education Ambassador, SPARC


Tuesday November 10, 2020 9:30am - 9:55am EST
All Together
  Community Connections, Conversation

10:00am EST

Tuesday Plenary: Maha Bali & Mia Zamora
Equitable Emergence: Telling the Story of “Equity Unbound” in the Open

How do we co-create an emergent, open community centered around equity in order to resist the exclusions of the hierarchical, hegemonic spaces we inhabit? How do we continually become what we and our communities need? These values are at the heart of Equity Unbound. Join us on a journey to explore this approach to open educational practice.

Slides: https://bit.ly/miaha

Join Socially Just Academia: https://bit.ly/JoinSociallyJust

Speakers
avatar for Maha Bali

Maha Bali

Associate professor of practice, American University in Cairo
Maha Bali is Associate Professor of Practice at the Center for Learning and Teaching at the American University in Cairo. She has a PhD in Education from the University of Sheffield, UK. She is co-founder of virtuallyconnecting.org (a grassroots movement that challenges academic gatekeeping... Read More →
avatar for Mia Zamora

Mia Zamora

Associate Professor, School of English Studies, Kean University
Writer. Educator. Connector. Maker.Associate Professor of English, Director of MA in Writing Studies & Kean University Writing Project; DML blogger.

Planners
avatar for Regina Gong

Regina Gong

OER & Student Success Librarian, Michigan State University
I'm the Open Educational Resources (OER) & Student Success Librarian at Michigan State University (MSU). I've had extensive experience leading an OER program from the ground up at a community college where I used to work, and now at a land-grant, research university. You can ask me... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 10:00am - 11:25am EST
All Together
  Plenary, Keynote

11:30am EST

Tea Time
"Tea time" is a break in scheduled programming when attendees can rest, practice self-care, or dive into networking or asynchronous sessions. There is no official programming during this time.

During this break, you can choose to take your tea time with Maha Bali and Mia Zamora to continue the conversation from their keynote talk.

Alternatively, here is a set of themed lightning talks to consider. After tuning in to these short presentations, free to take the conversation to Discord and share your thoughts with others.

Collaboration:
Our Powers Combined: An Open Ed Collaboration Between a Librarian and a Professor
Unlikely Partners: Harnessing Student Enthusiasm to Create an OER Grant
Collaborative Creation Between Librarians and English Faculty: Communication and Planning OER Textbooks

Tuesday November 10, 2020 11:30am - 11:55am EST
All Together
  Community Connections, Break

11:30am EST

Tea Time with Maha Bali and Mia Zamora
Follow up Maha Bali and Mia Zamora's interactive keynote with a "tea time" conversation. Grab the beverage of your choice and log in for a virtual conversation. 

Speakers
avatar for Maha Bali

Maha Bali

Associate professor of practice, American University in Cairo
Maha Bali is Associate Professor of Practice at the Center for Learning and Teaching at the American University in Cairo. She has a PhD in Education from the University of Sheffield, UK. She is co-founder of virtuallyconnecting.org (a grassroots movement that challenges academic gatekeeping... Read More →
avatar for Mia Zamora

Mia Zamora

Associate Professor, School of English Studies, Kean University
Writer. Educator. Connector. Maker.Associate Professor of English, Director of MA in Writing Studies & Kean University Writing Project; DML blogger.

Planners
avatar for Regina Gong

Regina Gong

OER & Student Success Librarian, Michigan State University
I'm the Open Educational Resources (OER) & Student Success Librarian at Michigan State University (MSU). I've had extensive experience leading an OER program from the ground up at a community college where I used to work, and now at a land-grant, research university. You can ask me... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 11:30am - 11:55am EST
Concurrent 1
  Community Connections, Conversation

12:00pm EST

Community Service and Open Pedagogy in the Time of COVID-19
Since March 2020 and the beginning of remote learning, faculty, administrators, and community partners dedicated to providing community service to students and support to the local population had many discussions on the future of our work. Rare were the discussions in which Open Pedagogy, or the creation of educational resources by students, was mentioned. Due to the importance of Project-Based Community Service, it is surprising that these two communities don’t interact more often, especially in the time of COVID-19. The first objective of this presentation is to promote developing bridging between our two communities. The second objective is to discuss the challenges faced by a professor and his teaching assistant when using Open Pedagogy by asking students to create small projects to help and serve the students of the local school district. We will discuss the concerns of creating these small projects, evaluating them from different perspectives, sharing them with the public, and licensing them under an OER license.

Learning Outcomes:
1) Creating Bridges between the Open Education Community and the Service-Learning Community.
2) Identifying the problems related to the use of Open Pedagogy when helping virtually the local community in the time of COVID 19,
3) Developing solutions to respond to these problems,
4) Presenting problems and solutions from different perspectives: a professor and two teaching assistants.

Speakers
avatar for Nicolas Simon

Nicolas Simon

Assistant Professor of Sociology, Eastern Connecticut State University
avatar for Shaheera Khan

Shaheera Khan

Student, Eastern Connecticut State University
avatar for Jean Rienzo

Jean Rienzo

Student, Eastern Connecticut State University


Tuesday November 10, 2020 12:00pm - 12:25pm EST
Concurrent 5
  COVID-19, Presentation

12:00pm EST

Charting a Statewide Course: Trends and Analysis from OER Grantees
In this session, we will share the data reported from OER Grantees who have participated in the Colorado OER Grant Program. We will discuss how having a sponsored and financially supported program has led to gains in OER awareness and adoption. Overall themes include large increases in the amount of OER champions on campuses, institutions tracking student cost savings, and administration support of OER.

Report: http://masterplan.highered.colorado.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/FINAL_OER_Report_2020_9_29_20.pdf

Slides: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/16rjdN4YlvTxkerQq6J9-S8vo2ZJ8pihwEChfmL81zhc/edit?usp=sharing

We will share quantitative, qualitative, and anecdotal data regarding the progress of grantees during the first 1.5 years of OER grant operations. We will also discuss case studies which highlight the value of open education beyond cost savings.

What’s clear is OER saves students money, but this investment matters beyond the financial benefit. OER and open education practices help educators redesign approaches to teaching through innovative methods, ultimately supporting the transformation of education for the future of learning. The work inspired by the OER legislation is important to students and educators everywhere.

We will discuss these specific key findings from our annual report:
1. Current performance measures indicate a striking return on the State’s initial investment. 2. National trends and local data suggest OER supports student learning outcomes while lowering costs for students. 3. Building capacity and funding creates a statewide ecosystem for successful OER adoption.

Background

Containing costs for students in higher education is paramount to the Colorado Department of Higher Education (CDHE) and the State of Colorado. Although data suggest that earning a postsecondary credential improves individual earning potential and offers robust return on investment, the cost of college or technical school remains a barrier. To this end, CDHE is building capacity for wide-scale implementation of open educational resources (OER), free or very low-cost teaching and learning materials that live in the open domain. Pursuing this strategy was borne out of a bill that created a statewide OER Council and grant program.

OERs, practices and philosophy have inspired educators to innovate by reinvigorating curricula, starting free textbook campaigns and more. This is a direct result of two key factors for institutional capacity: 1) State-supported OER grant funding and training opportunities and 2) the willingness of expert educators from all disciplines to continue to innovate their educational practices for the student benefit.

Learning Outcomes:
As a result of attending the session, colleagues will: Receive an overview of statewide data from the Colorado OER Grant program; including aggregate data from grantees, qualitative feedback on the OER grant, impact of OER on various types of campuses (community colleges. 4-years), and survey result from grantees. Learn about the impact of a campus grant to and new or existing OER initiatives at various types of campuses. Engage in an open review of the data collection and analysis process

Speakers
avatar for Brittany Dudek

Brittany Dudek

Manager, OER and Library, Colorado Community College System
avatar for Spencer Ellis

Spencer Ellis

Director of Educational Innovation, Colorado Department of Higher Education
avatar for Casey McCoy-Simmons

Casey McCoy-Simmons

PhD Student, University of Denver


Tuesday November 10, 2020 12:00pm - 12:25pm EST
Concurrent 4
  Strategies, Presentation

12:00pm EST

Automatic Textbook Billing: An Offer Students Can’t Refuse?
The nature of college course materials has changed dramatically over the past decade, from print to digital - but that’s nothing compared to the transition to remote learning in 2020. As of the end of August, less than a quarter of institutions will be fully or partially in-person, with even those places scrapping plans as case counts rise. This new normal and uncertainty of the higher ed landscape comes with unique challenges, and open advocates and commercial publishers see a make-or-break opportunity for widespread adoption of their preferred materials as faculty and schools shift to this remote learning environment.

Over the past few months, college textbook publishers have engaged in a massive marketing push to sell institutions on the idea of “inclusive access-” adding an automatic charge for digital delivery of access codes to each students’ tuition bill. The pressures of COVID-19 on institutions and the need for cheaper, ready-to-use digital materials is apparent - but are these partnerships to increase access code sales really in students’ best interest?

A panel of issue experts and on-the-ground open advocates will talk about the basics on this new billing model, the fine print that is in these partnerships, and problems with implementation that further harm student and faculty choice found by the recent USPIRG study Automatic Textbook Billing. Furthermore, panelists will share their successes and steps taken to slow automatic billing programs on R1, regional public, private, and community college campuses - and talk frankly about their setbacks in light of COVID-19. The session will end with best practices on how to respond to common questions on automatic billing, and audience Q&A.

Learning Outcomes:
Attendees will leave the session with an understanding of what automatic textbook billing is, specific concerns with the model before and during COVID-19, and how others across the country have effectively mobilized to limit the negative impact it has on local students and faculty. Attendees will come away with case studies, best practices, and actionable steps to take to reshape textbook affordability programs to better meet community needs.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Williamson

Daniel Williamson

Managing Director, OpenStax, Rice University
Daniel Williamson manages the day to day operations of OpenStax, using his extensive experience in academic e-publishing to guide content development, technology integration, and overall project coordination. A Rice University graduate, and passionate advocate of equity in education... Read More →
avatar for Megan Dempsey

Megan Dempsey

instructional services librarian, Raritan Valley Community College
avatar for Kaitlyn Vitez

Kaitlyn Vitez

Higher Education Campaigns Director, U.S. PIRG
Kaitlyn serves as the Student PIRGs' lobbyist on Capitol Hill, working on campaigns to make college more affordable and protect student loan borrowers. She has been a leading voice for students in opposition to access codes, the Cengage-McGraw Hill merger, and automatic textbook billing... Read More →
avatar for Ryan Erickson-Kulas

Ryan Erickson-Kulas

Program Officer, Michelson 20MM Foundation
avatar for Winni Zhang

Winni Zhang

Open Education Ambassador, SPARC
avatar for Nick Sengstaken

Nick Sengstaken

Chancellor's Fellow, UNC Chapel Hill
Chancellor's Fellow & Former Undergraduate Chief of StaffSince beginning his work in college affordability in 2016, Nicholas Sengstaken has emerged as the leading student in the United States pushing back against the publishing industry’s efforts to slow the adoption of OER... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 12:00pm - 12:55pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Challenges, Panel

12:00pm EST

You Don't Have to Write the Textbook: Curating Your Content for Class
Are you currently using a purchased textbook for a course you are teaching? Does every student have a copy? Does it include examples of different races, gender and living circumstances? Does it have examples of cultures different from your own? Creating an OER resource/textbook for student use can feel like a daunting task. Come and listen while we work to take the fear, anxiety, and uncertainty out of creating such a resource. Adding diversity in your content has many benefits. We aren’t re-writing the textbook, we are guiding student learning by compiling the best resources from open content. Gather a syllabus and a computer as we journey together to start the process.

Learning Outcomes:
Participants will identify 3-5 online resources to help them begin curating content for the creation of an OER playlist for a course in which they teach.
Participants will learn that creating an OER textbook does not have to be a daunting task and has many rewards for all involved.
Participants will experience a collaborative work environment that supports a range of ideas in curation of content.

Speakers
avatar for Gina Loveless

Gina Loveless

Educational Technology Consultant - OER, Michigan Department of Education
I have been through the ranks of K-12 education from coach, parent, teacher, instructional technology specialist, data specialist, and technology director. I currently am employed with the Michigan Department of Education as an Educational Technology consultant. My first year in this... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 12:00pm - 12:55pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Open Education 101, Workshop

12:00pm EST

Towards a Manifesto for Liberatory Open Education
In this participatory session, we will briefly share several examples of declarative writing and explore the potential value of such public and intentional declarations of one’s views, motives and intentions in the form of a manifesto within the context of education (Bayne et al., 2020; McCall, 2020).

We will then share our draft Manifesto for Liberatory Open Education, which seeks to clearly define ways in which we can actively break down barriers, both those real and imagined, between “formal education” and “informal education.” We will then invite participants to participate in an interactive discussion session in order to help co-create this document and talk about how might best share and use it.

The following is a short excerpt from our current draft:

Since the spring, schools have been disrupted. Along with lives. Among open educators, much attention has been focused on ways of teaching online (i.e., synchronous vs. asynchronous, online proctoring, etc.), on the use of pre-packaged, corporate based educational apps or platforms that purport to provide the “best quality” and “standards” for teaching and on the learning that students have missed and the content not covered. particularly as the boundaries between face-to-face learning and open (online) learning have blurred.  

We know that students learn with or without us. We are not satisfied simply engaging our students in “active learning” but also celebrate activism as learning (and learning as activism). We commit to inviting students to teach and teachers to learn. We refuse to place limits on our imaginations. We will not be afraid to ask, “What if…”

We know that obstacles in affecting change are real.  We know that racism, sexism, classism and many other forms of discimination are real. We refuse to “imagine” them away, but instead resolve to collectively and continuously demand equal rights and justice.

We know that boundaries between physical classrooms, digital spaces & the real world are colonial constructs. We believe we must challenge the boundaries between the classroom, whether physical or digital, and the world. We will not ask students returning to classes what content they missed, but instead what they learned while away. We will listen.  We will not underestimate our students. 

Find the working document HERE
References: Bayne, S. et al. (2016). Manifesto for Teaching Online. Retrieved from: https://blogs.ed.ac.uk/manifestoteachingonline/the-text/

McCall, A. (2020, July 30). What if we radically imagined the new school year [web log post]. Retrieved from: https://chicagounheard.org/blog/what-if-we-radically-reimagined-the
_________________________

Learning Outcomes
In this session participants will:
- Explore the purpose and relevance of declarative writing in the form of manifestos
- Discuss barriers and impacts of barriers between "formal" and "informal" education
- Annotate and contribute to a Manifesto for Liberatory Open Education
- Discuss use and sharing of the manifesto and contribute additional ideas to a Jamboard

Speakers
avatar for Karen Cangialosi

Karen Cangialosi

Professor, Keene State College
I am Professor of Biology and Open Education Faculty Fellow at Keene State College. I incorporate Open Pedagogy into my courses because of its great value in revolutionizing teaching and learning, and the ways in which it resonates very clearly with my passion for social justice... Read More →
avatar for Tanya Elias

Tanya Elias

Student, University of Calgary
I have been a open and distance education student for close to 25 years. I've seen a lot and learned a few things in that time. I'm currently working on an EdD at the University of Calgary (at a distance of course!) that is considering the implications of scale within Open Education... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 12:00pm - 12:55pm EST
Concurrent 2
  The Field, Interactive Discussion

12:30pm EST

Let Us In!: Utilizing Decolonized OERs to Increase Learner Acquisition
WE WILL ATTEMPT TO RESCHEDULE THIS SESSION

Activist Angela Davis has written extensively on abolitionism as well as diversity, particularly in relation to capitalism and how it structures society. The classroom, whether it takes places in a traditional building, virtually, or a combination of the two, is a microcosm of all societal ideologies, whether or not learners and instructors are cognizant. This panel will examine the historical usage of OERs, and how they evolved, as well as how pivotal it is to select OERs that reflect the needs of all learners.

The concept of OERs was born in the 1970s, and, while they originally existed for only certain disciplines, have been created in most disciplines today. Attending a public university was significantly cheaper in the 1970s, as the state and federal government funded the majority of the costs. As the cost of textbooks has risen astronomically, so has the need for quality OERs. Even when cost is not a factor for students, studies have shown that students prefer courses that use OERs (Fischer, Hilton, Schaffhauser, Stout), not only in lower level class, but in higher level classes too. Even though some instructors are resistant to utilizing OERs, studies demonstrate a greater need to implement them. Even more beneficial, student grades are typically higher in courses that use OERs.

That said, as is the case with any textbook, the type of OERs makes the definite difference. Students and educators often hear the term "diversity" used, but, one must ask, what is diversity? Different groups of people? Davis proposes the notion "that diversity must be combined with justice" and that we must strive for "diversity that makes a difference." By comparing sample OERs for a variety of disciplines, the importance of visual representation and the usage of language will be clearly delineated. Even though we all have our own biases and see the world through our own lens, OERs that allow for a variety of viewpoints and do not embrace any political agendas can foment a discussion on the importance of respectfully discussing issues with others who do not share the same viewpoint, regardless of the particular course content. OERs that favor one viewpoint over another, in the long run, inhibit critical thinking, a goal of learning in general.

As the United States becomes an increasingly more heterogeneous nation, selecting OERs that embrace Davis' notion of diversity may increase student learning and refine critical thinking skills.

Learning Outcomes:
After listening to this presentation, it is hoped that the members of the audience will: 1)recognize how the usage of Open Educational Resources (OERs) can easily remove traditional barriers to the classroom and increase learner acquisition; 2)learn strategies for selecting OERs that reject the traditional paradigm and aim for Crenshaw's concept of intersectionality; 3)how the usage of OERs can foment the creation of a more inclusive classroom and raise critical awareness.

Speakers
avatar for Dennis Miller

Dennis Miller

Associate Professor, Clayton State University
avatar for Reine Turcato

Reine Turcato

Assistant Adjunct Professor, St. Francis University


Tuesday November 10, 2020 12:30pm - 12:55pm EST
Concurrent 4
  Social Justice, Presentation

12:30pm EST

Incentivizing Open: Creating a Multi-Year OER Grant Program
You have been allocated funds to create and manage an OER Grant Program. Better yet, administrators are committed to a 3-year pilot term. How do you go about developing a multi-year program and what factors should you consider (from the start) to ensure the sustainability of the program? We will provide participants with insight into the formation of the first year of the OER Grant Program at McMaster University. We will share our experiences in creating documentation; determining the application process; selecting criteria for the evaluation of submissions; creating support services; and developing communication and promotion strategies. We will share our lessons learned and provide recommendations to help support others who are building a similar program at their institution. We would also like to hear from others' experiences in sustaining similar programs.

Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:
-identify the components of an OER grant program
-describe strategies to communicate and promote an OER grant program
-identify criteria for evaluating grant proposals in an equitable and fair manner
-develop support services for an OER grant program
-identify factors to consider to help sustain an OER grant program

Speakers
avatar for Olga Perkovic

Olga Perkovic

Open Education and Scholarship Librarian, McMaster University
Open Access and OER awareness and promotion to staff, students and instructors at McMaster University. Open Access Week; Open Education Week; OpenCon alumnus; open journal publishing and institutional repositories.
avatar for Joanne Kehoe

Joanne Kehoe

Lead Educational Developer, Digital Pedagogy, MacPherson Institute, McMaster University


Tuesday November 10, 2020 12:30pm - 12:55pm EST
Concurrent 5
  Strategies, Presentation

1:00pm EST

Collaborative Creation of the OER Metadata Rosetta Stone
The OER Discovery Working Group is a newly formed collaborative effort among OER advocates, facilitated by the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), involving metadata and cataloging librarians, and relevant specialists in the U.S. and Canada. This group’s focus is to support the community in developing best practices and outline potential next steps for how metadata standards could contribute to platform-neutral discovery of OER.

Members of the OER Discovery Work Group consist of stakeholders from eCampus Ontario, Institute for the Study of Knowledge Management in Education’s (ISKME) OER Commons, State University of New York (SUNY) at Geneseo’s Openly Available Sources Integrated Search (OASIS), and Mt Hood Community College Library’s (MHCC) OER MARC template. They created a document that translates core functionality across 3 commonly used metadata vocabularies - MARC21, Dublin Core, and Schema.org/LRMI - to meet the specific needs for OER.

This presentation will share the OER Metadata Rosetta Stone (CC-BY), highlight the collaborative process, and welcome discussion with attendees to inform future applications and collaborative developments for the community as a whole.


Learning Outcomes:
Attendees will be able to describe how metadata enables discovery and current needs for OER
Attendees will appraise and critique the OER Metadata Rosetta Stone based on their experiences with OER discovery
Attendees will be able to employ the OER Metadata Rosetta Stone for use at their own institution

Speakers
avatar for Bill Jones

Bill Jones

Digital Resources and Systems Librarian, State University of New York (SUNY) Geneseo Milne Library
Bill Jones is the Digital Resources and Systems Librarian at SUNY Geneseo Milne Library. He is the lead developer of Openly Available Sources Integrated Search (OASIS) and currently serves as the webmaster for ALA RUSA STARS. Bill supports SUNY libraries through his service in SUNYLA... Read More →
avatar for Camille Thomas

Camille Thomas

Scholarly Communication Librarian, Florida State University
avatar for Heather White

Heather White

Library Technical Services & OER Coordinator, Mt. Hood Community College
 


Tuesday November 10, 2020 1:00pm - 1:25pm EST
Concurrent 4
  Challenges, Presentation

1:00pm EST

Re-envisioning Accessibility for Math-Intensive OER
The accessibility of publications is critical for learners who rely on screen readers. What happens when an OER you plan to use, remix, or are creating is math intensive and you neither know LaTeX nor the accessibility options involved in presenting machine-readable equations? Issues abound! How can math display in OER be re-envisioned? This highly-interactive presentation builds off of the experiences of six people at three different institutions who met up to discuss their respective math & accessibility journeys, math-intensive OER accessibility failures, successes, and solutions that work for their level of capacity. From the extremely labor-intensive to the “automatic,” this case study-based presentation will aid participants in what not to do, and how re-envision processes and decision points for creating, adapting, and retrofitting OER that contain equations. Participants will have opportunities to share their knowledge regarding tools, solutions, and approaches in a common document and will leave with a tool kit of potential solutions for different electronic environments and platforms.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will be able to summarize standards, common issues, and options for displaying, printing, and developing screen-readable math in OER;
  • Participants will be able to recall specific issues with math display in OER as these will be connected to particular examples of OER;
  • Participants will leave with a tool kit of potential solutions for different electronic environments & platforms.
  • Participants will also be able to share their knowledge regarding tools, solutions, and approaches.

Speakers
avatar for Anita Walz

Anita Walz

Assistant Director for Open Education and Scholarly Communication Librarian, Virginia Tech
Anita Walz is the Assistant Director for Open Education and Scholarly Communication Librarian at Virginia Tech. She works with faculty, administrators, and staff on local, state, national and international levels to inspire faculty to choose, adapt, and create learning resources which... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 1:00pm - 1:25pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Challenges, Presentation

1:00pm EST

Virtual Clinical 101: An Open Educational Resource
PLEASE NOTE THIS SESSION IS PRE-RECORDED

This session presents the need for open educational resources for simulation educators as the need for more innovative ways of educating future nurses arise. The high cost of training for educators to become competent in the use of simulations in nursing education can be a barrier to the use of such technology in nursing education. There needs to be an initiative and continued advocacy to provide more accessible and affordable education on using simulation for all nurse educators, which, will eventually improve nursing education and quality of patient care. The current pandemic also highlights the reliance of higher education on traditional models of nursing education, specifically clinical education. Alongside the need to keep up with society’s demands for better ways to educate nurses, there is also an urgent need to convert to the use of simulations as the way to provide clinical education due to restrictions imposed by COVID 19. Nurse educators need urgent education on how to teach through simulations, but education may not be readily available, accessible, nor affordable. Furthermore, nurse educators, also need to learn how to facilitate, not just traditional simulations, but virtual simulations as well.

As a response to such urgent need, the authors designed a Virtual Simulations 101 through a simulation consortium. This is an asynchronous on-line course made up of four modules on the basics of simulation with focus on virtual simulations and standards of best practice. The course was pilot tested by clinical educators, and further revised after receiving feedback from learners. Principles and strategies of remote learning and teaching were implemented in designing the course.

This open resource was disseminated to all nursing programs in the state of Maryland. One nursing program required all its faculty to complete the course prior to starting clinical. Four release ESH was provided for their faculty. Over the span of one month, over 60 nursing faculty have enrolled in this course, 30 have successfully completed it.

The course has received positive feedback both from novice and expert simulation educators. Sample feedback includes:

“As we transition into total remote instruction for Fall 2020, the information not only provides necessary tools for facilitating that transition, these modules have encouraged me to be mindful of employing systematic methods that have already been vetted (rather than me just "winging" it!).”



Learning Outcomes:
Discuss relevance of open educational resources for simulation education

Explore designs for open educational resources for simulation educators

Describe the key elements of virtual course design of Virtual Simulations 101




Speakers
avatar for Raquel Bertiz

Raquel Bertiz

Faculty, Maryland Clinical Simulation Resource Consortium
avatar for Jasline Moreno

Jasline Moreno

Faculty Lead, The Maryland Clinical Resource Consortium


Tuesday November 10, 2020 1:00pm - 1:25pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Practices, Presentation

1:00pm EST

Accessing Open: Leveling the Playing Field for Students with Disabilities
In any given U.S. classroom, approximately twenty percent of our students have a documented disability. Still more may not have an official diagnosis but face other barriers to accessing learning. Open Educational Resources (materials that can be freely shared, reproduced, and revised) provide educators with an opportunity to reach the greatest number of learners through its flexibility and support of inclusive design decisions. After this session, participants will be able to see the nexus between Open Education and accessibility and begin to think about how OER and Open Pedagogy can help remove barriers to learning. Participants will also be encouraged to (re) consider our definitions of ‘access’ and seek to understand how Open Education aligns with intersectional approaches to social justice.

Learning Outcomes:
-Understand the classroom experience of students with disabilities
-Reflect on the potential of OER and Open Pedagogy to promote accessibility and help remove barriers

Speakers
avatar for Hannah Davidson

Hannah Davidson

Accessibility Specialist, Plymouth State University


Tuesday November 10, 2020 1:00pm - 1:25pm EST
Concurrent 2
  Social Justice, Presentation

1:00pm EST

On the Possibility of Involving Graduate Students in OpenEd’s Shift from Niche to Default
Graduate students are oddly placed in the Academy, wearing multiple hats that range from learner, to teaching assistant, to full-on instructor.  Yet, graduate students appear to be missing from—and missing out on—discussions around Open Education. 

Graduate students seem perfectly positioned to shift the perspective on OpenEd from niche to default. Graduate students are at once the trainees and the trainers, receiving instruction and providing it to multiple audiences.  Graduate students often create content for folks beyond the classroom too, through the likes of grant reports, policy briefs, public scholarship, and peer-to-peer resources.  In a way, graduate students are the mediators in the educational world who are looking towards next steps in their careers.

The possibilities of involving graduate students appear to be mutually beneficial:  stakeholders in OpenEd can broaden their impact by engaging with graduate students early on in their professionalization, while graduate students can gain exposure and proficiency in skills as they go on to different professions within the education sector.  As a graduate student and a newcomer to Open Education, this possibility makes me feel both incredibly hopeful and like it’s too good to be true.

My presentation is divided into three sections, loosely structured by the following questions.
(Q1) How are graduate students currently positioned to get involved with/in OpenEd?
(Q2) What initiatives can better integrate OpenEd and graduate student communities?
(Q3) What other opportunities and resources might come from graduate student involvement with/in OpenEd?
With a nod to speculating brighter futures, I invite attendees to imagine an educational world where folks were trained Open Education leaders earlier on in their professionalization.

Learning Outcomes:
(1) To reflect on the current role of graduate students in OpenEd. As someone new to Open Education, I propose three points of intervention.
(2) To hypothesize that actively engaging with grad students could increase the possibility of shifting OpenEd principles from niche to default. I propose two potential initiatives.
(3) To ideate ways of increasing graduate student involvement in creating, sharing, and applying Open Pedagogy principles. I am eager for community feedback.

Speakers
avatar for Maya Hey

Maya Hey

PhD Candidate, Concordia University (Montreal, Canada)
Hey! I'm interested in getting graduate students involved with OER as learners, instructors, researchers, content creators, and public intellectuals. I'm also happy to talk about food, feminist thought, and fermentation — the three domains of my dissertation. 


Tuesday November 10, 2020 1:00pm - 1:25pm EST
Concurrent 5
  The Field, Presentation

1:30pm EST

Tea Time
"Tea time" is a break in scheduled programming when attendees can rest, practice self-care, or dive into networking or asynchronous sessions. There is no official programming during this time.

During this break, you can choose to participate in VConnecting at tea time with Maha Bali, Mia Zamora and Terry Greene.

Alternatively, here is a set of themed lightning talks to consider. After tuning in to these short presentations, free to take the conversation to Discord and share your thoughts with others.

Everything COVID:
Striving for Affordability and access: Reimagining Undergraduate Courses in Times of COVID-19
Pushing Open During and Unprecedented Pandemic
They Made it Look Effortless: OER in Faculty Professional Development in a Pandemic

Tuesday November 10, 2020 1:30pm - 1:55pm EST
All Together
  Community Connections, Break

1:30pm EST

VConnecting at Tea Time
Speakers
avatar for Maha Bali

Maha Bali

Associate professor of practice, American University in Cairo
Maha Bali is Associate Professor of Practice at the Center for Learning and Teaching at the American University in Cairo. She has a PhD in Education from the University of Sheffield, UK. She is co-founder of virtuallyconnecting.org (a grassroots movement that challenges academic gatekeeping... Read More →
avatar for Mia Zamora

Mia Zamora

Associate Professor, School of English Studies, Kean University
Writer. Educator. Connector. Maker.Associate Professor of English, Director of MA in Writing Studies & Kean University Writing Project; DML blogger.
avatar for Terry Greene

Terry Greene

eLearning Designer, Trent University

Planners
avatar for Regina Gong

Regina Gong

OER & Student Success Librarian, Michigan State University
I'm the Open Educational Resources (OER) & Student Success Librarian at Michigan State University (MSU). I've had extensive experience leading an OER program from the ground up at a community college where I used to work, and now at a land-grant, research university. You can ask me... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 1:30pm - 1:55pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Community Connections, Conversation

2:00pm EST

Information Security Fundamentals: Theory and Hands on Practices
This session is divided into two sections. In the first section, we will discuss the theoretical (Open access) content organization for Information Security course. We will discuss couple of innovative and open source avenues from where the instructor can get assistance for course designing. We will also discuss the techniques for creation of digital contents which can enhance the learning for students. In the second section, we will introduce many open source and freeware ethical hacking tools which instructors can use to give hands on practice to their students.

Learning Outcomes:
After attending this session, the attendees will be able to design a fundamentals of information Security course which will have theoretical and hands on practical tools. They will also learn about open source security tools and other theoretical content.

Speakers
avatar for Umar Khokhar

Umar Khokhar

Assistant Professor of IT, Georgia Gwinnett College
avatar for Binh Tran

Binh Tran

Information Technology Associate Professor, Georgia Gwinnett College


Tuesday November 10, 2020 2:00pm - 2:25pm EST
Concurrent 4
  Practices, Presentation

2:00pm EST

It’s Alive! Reviving OER with Interactive Content to Create a Living Online Course
The 5Rs of OER are not only a framework for licensing, but an opportunity to breathe life into texts that might otherwise be forgotten. The 5Rs also power the generosity that open education advocates and practitioners have been sharing with their peers who are new to online education. The speed at which open textbook creators can now adapt material for new contexts is a valuable skill as the future of higher education constantly shifts, and, coupled with the potential for OER to grow and fill new gaps, OER creators are poised to lead the shift to blended and online learning.

This panel will feature educators who have enhanced existing OER by incorporating formative and summative assessment to remix/revise the existing resource into a package suitable for an online course. By using H5P interactive content, importing chapters from other texts, and/or adding a social annotation layer with Hypothesis, panelists have revived OER to become the basis for online learning and provided one quick, efficient model for transferring a previously in-person course to a blended or online learning environment. Our panelists will share their experiences with creating and incorporating multimedia, annotation, H5P activities and other interactive content in their openly licensed texts and will explore some of the challenges, successes, and surprises they've encountered along the way.

Learning Outcomes:
- Compare and assess interactive elements and multimedia that can be integrated into online content to enrich the student experience
- Attendees will understand how they could develop a simple openly licensed “Frankenbook” for quick pivot to online learning
- Imagine long term applications for interactive online course material such as making open textbooks with students as a form or non-disposable assignment

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Nakano

Michelle Nakano

Faculty, Science & Horticulture, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
Michelle is a career educator whose priority is student engagement in experiential learning and open education. 
avatar for Steel Wagstaff

Steel Wagstaff

Educational Product Manager, Pressbooks
I'm the educational product owner for Pressbooks, a small Canadian startup which makes open source book publishing software. I've spent most of my adulthood attending or working for universities, though I've worked outside the academy as a land surveyor, prison educator, and youth... Read More →
avatar for Brenna Clarke Gray

Brenna Clarke Gray

Coordinator, Educational Technologies, Thompson Rivers University
Brenna Clarke Gray is an educational technologist by day and a comics scholar by night. She writes on representations of Canada in American comic books and the failings of the Canadian academy in equal measure. You can find her on Twitter: @brennacgray.
avatar for Adeola Agoke

Adeola Agoke

Associate Director of the African Language Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Tuesday November 10, 2020 2:00pm - 2:25pm EST
Concurrent 5
  Practices, Presentation

2:00pm EST

Reimagining Open Education Resources
This session introduces and demonstrates content-addressable resources for education, a set of tools and processes for the creation and storage of learning resources in a distributed peer-to-peer network.

Closed and commercial models of education are often based on the argument that open learning is not sustainable, and thus, must be supported by means of professional content creators and some mechanism for subscription fees or other revenue-based models. This presentation argues that there are community-based models supporting open educational resources and learning technology that offer a response to this argument.

Specifically, the presentation will describe the use of hash algorithms to create a unique address for every resource, describe mechanisms for resource revisions, combining aggregations of resources, and identifying the provenance of resources. Participants will see for themselves how such a system works through a demonstration of open source tools.

The authors recently developed and used these resources in a MOOC, which will be shared. Participants can see how content-addressable resources could be used in combination with other graph-based technologies to create such features as learner-generated content, activity records, and digital badges. Because these records are stored and linked as one-way encrypted data, they are private and secure. Participants can determine for themselves whether any course-related activity is shared to a wider audience.

The presentation will then describe the application of these mechanisms to support a global distributed network of open educational resources as an alternative to centralized resource repositories. It will suggest how educators can access, reuse, and contribute to the global network.

The presentation will argue that content-addressable resources offer an alternative to license-based resources by offering new community-based models of sustainability as well as being able to guarantee provenance and authenticity.

An important aspect of these resources is that they can be developed or modified by anyone. This supports not only content revision but also a common mechanism for community-based meta-tagging or content reviews and to, optionally, provide data on context and use. Thus participants will be able to appreciate how content-addressable resources can inhabit a rich ecosystem that provides an open alternative to published-based and controlled repositories.

Learning Outcomes:
Participants will learn about content addressing for open educational resources as an alternative to URL and domain-based addressing. They will be able to:
- describe how content addressing works-
- describe the use of content addressing to enable a secure and distributed resource network
- create and add their own open educational resources to the network
- access and reuse resources from the network
- appreciate how content addressing provides an alternative to license-based OER

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Downes

Stephen Downes

Researcher, NRC
Stephen Downes works in the fields of online learning and new media. Downes has explored and promoted the educational use of computer and online technologies since 1995 and continues to focus on researching how educators approach internet-based education. His major goal for the future... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 2:00pm - 2:25pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Strategies, Presentation

2:00pm EST

Zero Textbook Cost Degrees: Assess Campus Readiness and Plan for Success
The high cost of textbooks is a well-documented barrier to student success with a disproportionately adverse effect on traditionally underserved students. Zero Textbook Cost (ZTC) Degrees, a complete pathway of courses where textbooks have been replaced with open educational resources (OER) or zero cost materials, can save students up to 25% of the cost of earning a degree and can accelerate progress towards completion* and reduce equity gaps.**

Institutions developing ZTC degrees are investing in overall student success. Converting all courses in a pathway requires coordination and collaboration across multiple divisions towards a common goal with a shared timeline. Faculty, staff, administrators, and student affairs are critical advocates in the success of these programs.

Join this workshop to assess your college’s readiness to embark on ZTC degrees. Discuss how to identify potential degree pathways and campus stakeholders that can support the work. Learn about building a cross-functional team to support faculty development and delivery of courses and how to align the goals and messaging of ZTC with other strategic student success initiatives on campus to ensure longer term viability.

* Hilton, J., Fischer, L., Wiley, D., & Williams, L. (2016). Maintaining Momentum Toward Graduation: OER and the Course Throughput Rate. International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 17(6). http://dx.doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v17i6.2686

**Colvard, N., Watson, E., Park, H (2018). The Impact of Open Educational Resources on Various Student Success Metrics,cVolume 30, Number 2, 262-276 , http://www.isetl.org/ijtlhe/pdf/IJTLHE3386.pdf

Learning Outcomes:
Assess the readiness and goals for your institution to begin a Z-degree program
Select the Z-degree discipline or certificate program
Build the team and plan the workflow and support for faculty and student outreach
Course Design Considerations
Planning deployment and feedback/outcome collection
Sharing with campus stakeholders and linking with strategic goals

Speakers
avatar for James Glapa-Grossklag

James Glapa-Grossklag

Dean, College of the Canyons
James Glapa-Grossklag is the Dean of Educational Technology, Learning Resources, and Distance Learning at College of the Canyons (California, USA). He directs the statewide CCC DECT grant and also co-coordinates Technical Assistance for the CCC Zero Textbook Cost grant program. James... Read More →
avatar for Ron Oxford

Ron Oxford

Librarian, West Hills College Lemoore
avatar for Kelsey Smith

Kelsey Smith

OER Librarian, West Hills College Lemoore
avatar for Liz Yata

Liz Yata

Manager of Communities of Practice, CCCOER - Open Education Global
I manage, coordinate, and support the activities of OE Global’s regional node for US community colleges, the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER), which includes membership, online events, workshops, webinars, and social media. As well as providing support for major global events such as the annual Open Education Global Conference and Open Education Week... Read More →
avatar for Una Daly

Una Daly

CCCOER, Director, Open Education Global


Tuesday November 10, 2020 2:00pm - 2:55pm EST
Concurrent 2
  Open Education 101, Workshop

2:00pm EST

Opening a Space and Place for #WOCinOER: Stories, Experiences, and Narratives

Open Educational Resources (OER) adoption in higher education institutions has grown exponentially in the last ten years. While a great deal of focus is on the benefits of OER to students (affordability and access) and faculty (agency and freedom), less attention is given to those doing the work to implement and manage these projects. Across many institutional OER programs, the person leading and managing these initiatives tend to be women and librarians who do not necessarily have this role as their sole responsibility. It relies on the passion and energy of the librarian OER champion to grow the initiative and yet, their efforts are largely hidden and sometimes invisible. As a result, burnout ensues alongside feelings of being undervalued and unsupported for the hard work that they do.

As women of color (WOC) leading open education programs in our institutions, this interactive discussion will provide a space where other WOC could share their experiences, stories, and narratives that for the most part, have remained hidden and unheard. While the open education community espouses openness, diversity, equity, and inclusion, #WOCinOER are still underrepresented in leadership and in the community writ large. Our hope is that our stories bring about change rooted in solidarity through our shared experiences as #WOCinOER.

Participants will crowdsource and share ideas for creating a manifesto of what #WOCinOER want to see in a truly inclusive, equitable, and transformative open education:
- What is it like to navigate spaces steeped in whiteness and racism?
- How do we increase participation and amplify voices of #WOCinOER?
- What would an inclusive, equitable, empowering, and affirming environment look like for women of color (WOC) leading open education initiatives?

Learning Outcomes:
1. Share and/or actively listen to counterstories around OER work as/from women of color.
2. Share and contextualize their own lived experience as WOC in OER with other participants within the dominant narrative.
3. Question existing OER infrastructure and strategize for an inclusive and transformative open education community.

The session Jamboard will be available through the end of day Friday and will be hosted on the Michigan State University institutional repository: http://bit.ly/WOCinOER

Speakers
avatar for Ariana Santiago

Ariana Santiago

OER Coordinator, University of Houston
avatar for Cynthia Orozco

Cynthia Orozco

Librarian, East Los Angeles College
avatar for Regina Gong

Regina Gong

OER & Student Success Librarian, Michigan State University
I'm the Open Educational Resources (OER) & Student Success Librarian at Michigan State University (MSU). I've had extensive experience leading an OER program from the ground up at a community college where I used to work, and now at a land-grant, research university. You can ask me... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 2:00pm - 2:55pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Social Justice, Interactive Discussion

2:30pm EST

Redesigning an Open Textbook by Leveraging Media, Pedagogy, and Student Collaboration
In Fall 2018, we adopted an Openstax textbook, Principles of Macroeconomics 2e, in an introductory economic class that enrolls approximately 800 students every academic year. The result of an end-of-semester survey indicated that the students appreciated the use of a free textbook, and the majority of them were overall satisfied with the textbook. However, they wished the book could be more visual, more interactive, and the assessment could better help them learn. With support from an Affordable Learning Georgia grant, we formed a team that comprises of subject matter expert, content and assessment developer, multimedia and web developer, and instructional designer, working together to redesign the textbook. In this session, we will share our experiences of leveraging media, pedagogy, and student collaboration to redesign this textbook. Specifically, we will discuss how the successful transformation of the textbook was accomplished through rigorous application of the following six strategies:

1.Multimedia learning: We employed six research-based principles for multimedia learning as the guidelines for presenting the textbook content.
2.Active learning: We engaged students with frequent self-assessment exercises embedded in the textbook.
3.Practice with feedback: We provided students with instant feedback on both correct and incorrect answer choices when they practiced with the embedded exercises.
4.Students as producers: We believed in the benefits of a student-as-producer approach – students are not only consumers of knowledge but also producers of knowledge. We recruited several students to help with content, assessment, and web design under the supervision and guidance of the project leads. They have had some experience with the course, for example, completing the course as a student, working as a teaching assistant, or a peer tutor for the course. Their perspectives on how a textbook should be designed for students became valuable assets for the project.
5.Peer review: The textbook was reviewed by people who are not involved in the project before it was made available to students.
6.Student feedback: Feedback will be collected from students for future revision and improvement of the textbook.

The redesigned textbook was put into use in Fall 2020, and we are currently collecting student feedback. During this session, we will also share the initial findings of a student survey on the usefulness and effectiveness of the textbook.

Learning Outcomes:
Participants will be able to identify pedagogies, technologies, and strategies for designing and redesigning interactive open educational resources that engage students. They will also be able to discuss how they could adopt and adapt them to their own design and redesign.

Speakers
avatar for Chaohua Ou

Chaohua Ou

Assistant Director, Learning and Technology Initiatives, Georgia Institute of Technology
avatar for Aselia Urmanbetova

Aselia Urmanbetova

Associate Academic Professional, Georgia Institute of Technology


Tuesday November 10, 2020 2:30pm - 2:55pm EST
Concurrent 4
  Challenges, Presentation

2:30pm EST

Secondary/Post-Secondary Collaboration in OER Creation
The session will highlight two secondary/post-secondary partnerships to create and implement two new Open Educational Resources. These partnerships are connected to the College in the Schools program at Central Lakes College. Two high school instructors worked with CLC college instructors this year to create OER.

Mitchell Denny, high school English instructor, and Lori-Beth Larsen and Kate Porter, college reading instructors revised an OER for Critical Literacy. The Critical Literacy OER will be used in two high schools this Fall 2020. Students enrolled in the course will receive college credit taught by a high school instructor in collaboration with a college instructor.

Joy Davis, a high school Spanish instructor, co-created an OER for Global Studies using the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals as a framework. The OER for Global Studies will be used in five high schools this coming school year. Students enrolled in Introduction to Global Studies will get college credit in several goal areas. These courses will be taught by high school instructors in collaboration with a college instructor.


Learning Outcomes:
Participants will learn about how a college instructor collaborated with secondary instructors on two OER projects. They have access to the two OER (Global Studies and Critical Literacy), and will learn about how the collaboration is being implemented in six different high schools in Minnesota.

Speakers
avatar for Lori-Beth Larsen

Lori-Beth Larsen

Instructor and OER Lead Faculty, Central Lakes College


Tuesday November 10, 2020 2:30pm - 2:55pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Practices, Presentation

3:00pm EST

Innovative First Year Experience: Documenting Student Experiences During COVID-19
The first-year college experience looks vastly different now than ever before due to COVID-19. Because of this, Fall 2020 first-year students’ college experiences will be distinct compared to those of UT San Antonio freshmen in the past.

In this session, learn how the UTSA Libraries, in partnership with First Year Experience instructors, Teaching and Learning Services, and other campus partners created a framework for capturing student perspectives, feelings, and memories that reflect this extraordinary time.

Attendees will learn: innovative practices for coordinating communication and documentation around large scale digital repository and open pedagogy initiatives; new ideas for cross-campus collaboration with campus partners; how to leverage digital repositories and market their virtues to faculty and campus partners; strategies for negotiating and working with campus collaborators on digital repository and open pedagogy projects.

Learning Outcomes:
Relate to the FYE college experience during Fall 2020
Understand the importance of capturing this experience for hindsight and future research
Learn best practices for coordinating documentation around large scale digital repository and open pedagogy initiatives
Explain best strategies for cross campus collaboration on digital repository and open pedagogy projects

Speakers
avatar for DeeAnn Ivie

DeeAnn Ivie

Open Education Coordinator, University of Texas at San Antonio
avatar for Emily Johnson

Emily Johnson

Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Texas at San Antonio


Tuesday November 10, 2020 3:00pm - 3:25pm EST
Concurrent 1
  COVID-19, Presentation

3:00pm EST

Employing Students as Partners in Open Educational Resource Creation
Open educational resources are linked to a more accessible and affordable format of higher education, as well as being shown to increase student learning overall (Hilton, 2016). Despite these benefits, the uptake of OERs has been slow in the post-secondary sector. Some educators have been hesitant to pursue OERs in their courses due to confusion of ownership and licensing, funding, institutional recognition, and most commonly, time (Hocevar, 2017).

This presentation seeks to address these barriers by introducing the concept of using students as partners in the creation, adaption, and adoption of OERs. The given presentation will provide an overview of three main points:
Why hiring students as partners in OERs serves as a solution to the barriers faced by educators in OER creation.
How to navigate student funding, including discovering existing grant and employment opportunities, and the training required for OER creation.
The benefits for both faculty and students for participating in a partnered OER creation.

This presentation will walk participants through a conceptual methodology of how to pair the need for greater OER initiatives on campuses, with the need for students to develop skills and attributes for success in post-secondary education and beyond. The processes and benefits students gain as full-time collaborators of OER partnerships will be based off of High Impact Practice and Students as Partners literature (cf. Kuh 2008, (Frison & Melacarne, 2017; Bovill & Felten, 2016).

Bovill, C., & Felten, P. (Eds.). (2016). Engaging students as partners in learning and teaching: Implications for academic development. International Journal for Academic Development: Special Issue, 21(1), 1-90.

Frison, D., & Melacarne, C. (2017). Fostering “student voice” to improve teaching & learning methods in higher education. Teaching and Learning Together in Higher Education, 1(20). Retrieved from http://repository.brynmawr.edu/tlthe/vol1/iss20/6

Hilton, J. (2016) Open educational resources and college textbook choices: a review of research on efficacy and perceptions. Education Tech Research and Development, 64(4), 573 – 590.

Kuh, G. (2008). High Impact Educational Practices. What are they, Who has Access to them and Why they Matter. Washington, D.C.: Association of American Colleges and Universities.


Learning Outcomes:
Throughout this presentation, participants will gain a better understanding of the role of students as partners (SAP) in adopting, adapting, and creating open educational resources (OERs). This session will focus on how to navigate hiring students, training students, and the mutual benefits of student partnership for both students and faculty as backed by SAP literature (cf Bovill, C., & Felten, P., 2016)

Speakers
avatar for Kim Mears

Kim Mears

Health Sciences & Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Prince Edward Island
Kim Mears is the Health Sciences and Scholarly Communications Librarian at the University of Prince Edward Island. She manages the Robertson Library's repository and faculty profile system, IslandScholar, and supports researchers with data management through data.upei.ca. Kim also... Read More →
avatar for Meghan Landry

Meghan Landry

Scholarly Communications Librarian, St. Francis Xavier University
Meghan Landry is currently a Scholarly Communications Librarian at Angus L. Macdonald Library, StFX University, in Antigonish, Nova Scotia. Her scholarly interests and projects include institutional repositories (Islandora), open access, accessibility and Universal Design for Learning... Read More →
avatar for Tiffany MacLennan

Tiffany MacLennan

Research Fellow and Strategist, The Maple League of Universities
Tiffany MacLennan is a recent graduate of St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, NS and has been a strong advocate for OER adoption in the Maritime Provinces of Canada. Through her time as the Vice President Academic for the StFX Students’ Union, a Senator for the StFX Senate... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 3:00pm - 3:25pm EST
Concurrent 4
  Open Education 101, Presentation

3:00pm EST

Reimagining the System: From Individual Adopters to Programmatic Adaptation
For years, the library at Western Colorado University facilitated several individual OER adoptions across at least ten disciplines. In 2019, the library leveraged those past successes to imagine and propose a fundamental shift across a whole discipline.

The library identified a scaffolded program that was poised to adapt to a more dynamic curriculum--one that would impact all students throughout multiple courses. After gaining the support of the chair and the directors of the program, the library secured funding and helped assembled a team of instructors within the department to identify open resources upon which they could reinvent their curriculum.

This new Gen Ed curriculum, built entirely on open resources and designed to adapt to changes in the discipline as well as the world around us, will be adopted by all faculty by the Spring of 2021. It will impact every student at Western.

Our discussion will highlight the steps we took along the way to encourage others to adapt when we had no positional power in any given department.
Adopted by all faculty, impact every single student at WCU moving forward.

Learning Outcomes:
Recognize when to alter your strategy from one-off adoptions to programmatic change
Identify chairs and program directors who are open to adaptation
Assemble a diverse team to design curriculum
Identify funding


Speakers
avatar for Kimberly Yadon

Kimberly Yadon

Instructional Technologist & Designer, Western Colorado University
avatar for Dustin Fife

Dustin Fife

Director of Library Services and Online Education, Western Colorado University


Tuesday November 10, 2020 3:00pm - 3:25pm EST
Concurrent 2
  Strategies, Presentation

3:00pm EST

Reimagining Power in OER Labor
Open education is built upon values of collaboration, inclusivity, equity, and accessibility, yet these same values are not consistently reflected in the hiring, management, and support of OER practitioners. Specifically, librarianship, a field that is feminized but not feminist, espouses values of democracy and access while perpetuating oppressive systems. In this presentation, we discuss how feminist theory offers an avenue for exploring this dissonance, with a focus on the conceptualization of power and that impact on OER labor. Recognizing librarianship’s and feminism’s historic privileging of cisgendered, white, middle-class women, we adopt Crenshaw’s (1989) framework of intersectionality to explicitly address structural marginalization and oppression in the field. Following this brief presentation, we invite participants to join us in reimagining how power might be shared among OER creators, collaborators, and consumers to foster more equitable labor conditions. In breakout rooms, participants will critique the applicability of feminist theory to OER labor, offer suggestions for alternative theoretical frameworks, and co-develop action items to aid in translating theory to practice.

Learning Outcomes:
At the end of the session, participants will be able to…
1.) Apply tenets of feminist theory to a discussion of power imbalances in OER labor
2.) Critique the applicability of feminist theory to power imbalances in OER labor
3). Collaboratively develop action items for applying theory to practice in combating power imbalances in their own professional contexts

Slides:https://bit.ly/OERLaborSlides & Resource Document: https://bit.ly/OERLaborResources

Speakers
avatar for Lindsay Inge Carpenter

Lindsay Inge Carpenter

Pedagogy Librarian, University of Maryland, College Park
avatar for Jessica Dai

Jessica Dai

Librarian, West Virginia University


Tuesday November 10, 2020 3:00pm - 3:25pm EST
Concurrent 3
  The Field, Presentation

3:30pm EST

Tea Time
"Tea time" is a break in scheduled programming when attendees can rest, practice self-care, or dive into networking or asynchronous sessions. There is no scheduled programming during this time.

If you choose, here is a set of themed lightning talks to consider. So, grab a favorite beverage and tune in to these short presentations. Feel free to take the conversation to Discord and share your thoughts with others.

Looking Toward the Future:
Global Perspectives in Open Ed: Opportunities for the Present and Future​​​
Open at the Edges, or the Edges of Open​​​
Journeys through OER Past,Present, and Future Adventures and Understandings​​​

Tuesday November 10, 2020 3:30pm - 3:55pm EST
Break
  Community Connections, Break

4:00pm EST

From Users to Creators: Making and Sharing Open Labs for Online STEM Courses
This presentation from the University of New England’s College of Graduate and Professional Studies (CGPS), composed of a lead course instructor and 2 instructional designers, will explore the collaborative process behind creating and making accessible open lab assignments for an online Introductory Physics course in response to COVID-19. Introductory Physics has been redesigned using the OpenStax College Physics textbook, but lab assignments have relied on lab kits from a commercial vendor. When this lab vendor experienced significant delays in shipping to students, our team of adjunct Physics instructors tasked themselves with creating alternative lab assignments that could be completed by students safely in their homes as affordable remote labs. Instructional designers then incorporated these alternative labs into online course sections, ensuring students in geographically isolated locations were able to complete their full course without significant interruption or loss in educational quality. Building from CGPS’ commitment to adopting more OER in courses, instructional designers proposed openly- licensing these new instructor-created labs, in order to properly credit instructors for their individual contributions and to share back resources to the wider educational community. We will discuss how we seek to support instructors throughout the OER creation process and how we ultimately intend to share these materials out. Finally, we will talk about the unexpected challenges and additional labor requirements that have presented in our attempts to convert these lab assignments into fully open materials, and how we intend to mitigate these issues in future projects by planning for openness as an explicit project goal.

Learning Outcomes:
Explore a project framework for instructor-created, open labs in an online physics course; Identify opportunities and challenges present in applying this framework to other online STEM courses

Speakers
avatar for Natalie Hill

Natalie Hill

Instructional Designer, University of New England
avatar for Corbin Brace

Corbin Brace

Lead Instructor, Physics I, University of New England
avatar for Michael Trombley

Michael Trombley

Instructional Designer, University of New England
Hey there! Since 2015, I have worked as an instructional designer at the University of New England's Online College for Graduate and Professional Studies. In my work at UNE Online, I have had the pleasure of collaborating with wonderful subject-matter experts and instructors on courses... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 4:00pm - 4:25pm EST
Concurrent 4
  Collaborations, Presentation

4:00pm EST

We Need to Talk About OER Discovery
Great strides have been made in the creation and adoption of open educational resources.Perceived challenges to finding open educational resources has continued to be a barrier as the number of resources grow. In the Open Textbook Library, the number of open textbooks has increased from just 80 in 2012 to 790 in 2020. However, discovery has become a pain point among advocates and adopting instructors to the degree that commercial textbook publishers are using language in their product messaging that OER is hard to find. State legislation in the United States also focuses on building or examining state repositories to increase discovery.

This panel will explore OER Discovery as a growth area. It will feature a high level discussion about the specific needs and possible solution(s) for finding, storing and accessing open textbooks and beyond. The discussion will also explore challenges, successes, and the silos that exist among initiatives led by the OER community. Panelists are leaders in OER with a history of addressing this barrier and/or lead new projects and initiatives to enhance OER Discovery.

Wally Grotophorst, Associate University Librarian, George Mason University/Mason Metafinder

Creator of the Mason OER Metafinder, Wally will discuss the challenges and opportunities that accompany federated searching for OER content.

Michelle Brennan, OER Information Services Manager, Institute for the Study of Knowledge Management in Education (ISKME)/OER Commons

Michelle leads research and development of information and library services for ISKME’s OER Commons platform and Partner Library Microsites. Michelle will discuss challenges in supporting libraries and librarians in creating and curating OER that meets the unique teaching and learning needs of faculty adopters at a consortial scale.


Karen Lauritsen, Publishing Director, Open Education Network
Karen manages the Open Textbook Library, which offers live MARC records for discovery. This year the OTL worked with OCLC to include its records in WorldCat.

Camille Thomas, Lead, SPARC OER Discovery Initiative and Scholarly Communication Librarian at Florida State University

Camille will discuss working with SPARC to connect with existing leaders (e.g. OER repository directors, metadata librarians, OER researchers and OER advocacy organizations) to leverage the work already being done.


Learning Outcomes:
Attendees will be able to describe how metadata enables discovery and current needs for OER
Attendees may interpret the discussion and employ future action items (e.g. talking points, further discussion) based on insights
Attendees may become better equipped to discuss OER Discovery at their own institutions or organizations

Speakers
avatar for Karen Lauritsen

Karen Lauritsen

Publishing Director, Open Education Network
avatar for Michelle Brennen

Michelle Brennen

Information Services Manager, ISKME/OER Commons
avatar for Camille Thomas

Camille Thomas

Scholarly Communication Librarian, Florida State University
avatar for Wally Grotophorst

Wally Grotophorst

Associate University Librarian, George Mason University


Tuesday November 10, 2020 4:00pm - 4:55pm EST
Concurrent 2
  Challenges, Panel

4:00pm EST

Opening Access in Remote Communities: A Canadian North Perspective
Three panelists discuss their perspectives on open education in the Northwest Territories of Canada based on the areas and students they serve.

Aurora College’s online pilot of the Personal Support Worker program aims to bring training for well-paid employment in an increasingly necessary sector to new immigrants and Indigenous residents of remote communities who may not otherwise engage in post-secondary education. Entrance requirements focus more on students’ suitability for this role in their communities. Necessary academic upgrading is designed into the program to open it to candidates with the cultural strengths to succeed in this career.

The School of Business and Leadership adapted to fiscal restraint and resisted pressures to close programs through partnering with quasi-government organizations and sharing technological resources. A blended format with synchronous video conferencing classrooms afforded new ways of opening higher education to learners on multiple campuses scattered across across 1.34 million square kilometers. Access to these programs is further opened with the College’s University and College Access Program (UCAP) and the Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) course that grants secondary school credits for accomplishments of adult life.

Satellite learning centres in isolated (fly-in) communities provide free academic upgrading and Literacy & Essential Skills training to adults impacted by colonization, denied the academic credentials, self-confidence, or economic and social standing needed to move to the Territory’s three major centres and enrol in post-secondary courses on campus.

This broad range of sectors and student characters challenge commonly accepted delineations of open education. We contend that innovative educational programs, policies, and practices evolving in Canada’s north speak to equity and access in other colonized spaces.

Learning Outcomes:
To illustrate the importance of opening up of non-formal, informal and formal learning opportunities to all remote residents of the NWT.

To inform the diversity of educational needs.

To identify the array of necessary connections given geographical dispersion, variability of educational experiences and divergent needs amongst communities.

To provide examples of various methods used to open up education to remote populations.

Edited after session: In answer to a question about literature on educational trauma, Jim answered with the names of several Indigenous scholars, who, although not all address trauma directly, speak to the indigenous educational experience.  Here's a better sampling of authors than Jim could remember at the time:
Batiste, Marie 
Brayboy, Bryan McKinley Jones 
Brave Heart, Maria Yellow Horse
Smith, Linda Tuhiwai 
Archibale, Jo-ann 
Kirkness, Verna J. 

link to our open slides (now open for commenting only)  
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1RLB_Pg7sBtT8Bo7ydj2NsnQNon9Gf4IG7abFjBUUfbw/edit?usp=sharing 


Speakers
avatar for Jim Stauffer

Jim Stauffer

Adult Learning Specialist - Educational Technology, Aurora College
lifelong learning, connected learning, rural and remote Indigenous communities, non-western ways of knowing and being
avatar for Tammy Soanes-White

Tammy Soanes-White

Instructor, Aurora College
My interests are in distributed teaching and learning, remote post-secondary and higher education and in technology enabled practices. 
avatar for Wanda Roberts

Wanda Roberts

Senior Instructor, PSW program, Aurora College


Tuesday November 10, 2020 4:00pm - 4:55pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Practices, Panel

4:00pm EST

From Voice to Action: Working in Partnership with Students
While there are more students than any other type of open education stakeholder on college campuses and are the central reason for our colleges’ existence, they are often underrepresented in program creation and advocacy efforts. Oftentimes, one hears from OER community members that it can be hard to identify and sustain student involvement, given the short period of time that they are enrolled and available.

Including students from the initial planning period through the rollout of a full-scale program not only improves community buy in and participation, but also creates a real call for long-term, sustainable investment in OER. Including students does require some planning, but the efforts are well worth the results.

The session will use a case study of the ongoing CALPIRG Students campaign to establish a UC-wide open textbook grant program, as well as examples from other successful past efforts, to illustrate the best practices of engaging students in open textbook advocacy. Starting with where to find students, to setting goals and common talking points, and co-planning a strategy to gain sustained OER funding and support, this presentation is grounded in the experiences of a full time community organizer and full time students.


Learning Outcomes:
Participants will walk away with the best practices for establishing a working relationship with student leaders, tips for creating effective goals, and ways to build sustainability into plans. We will also cover solving some of the most common issues those engaging with students face - with solutions to those problems suggested by students themselves.

Speakers
avatar for Cailyn Nagle

Cailyn Nagle

Affordable Textbooks Campaign Director, US PIRG
avatar for Prabdeep Rai

Prabdeep Rai

UCLA Chapter Chair/Textbooks Coordinator, Student PIRGs
avatar for Nick Sengstaken

Nick Sengstaken

Chancellor's Fellow, UNC Chapel Hill
Chancellor's Fellow & Former Undergraduate Chief of StaffSince beginning his work in college affordability in 2016, Nicholas Sengstaken has emerged as the leading student in the United States pushing back against the publishing industry’s efforts to slow the adoption of OER... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 4:00pm - 4:55pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Strategies, Interactive Discussion

4:30pm EST

Making Music Education Open: A New Framework
This session will introduce some ways that market forces create unique challenges when engaging with music in an open education context. While exciting open resources for music scholars continue to be developed, there is a gap when considering open education for performers and applied musicians.

This presentation will present a framework for evaluating and approaching the tools and materials that applied musicians create and study and will outline ways that others can foster more productive approaches to open education for music makers. The presenters will also discuss how this work is informing approaches towards inclusive and anti-racist practices in music.


Learning Outcomes:
Identify the ways that traditional music scholarship and applied music education differ and how to support applied musicians engagement with open education
Recognize the ways that the challenges with open education and music parallel traditional academic disciplines
Compare your local music situation to two contrasting case studies to identify opportunities to expand music open education in your local context

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Vest

Matthew Vest

Music Librarian, UCLA
Matthew Vest is the Lead for Outreach and the Music Inquiry and Research Librarian at UCLA. His research interests include change leadership in higher education, digital projects and publishing for music and the humanities, and composers working at the margins of the second Viennese... Read More →
avatar for Kathleen DeLaurenti

Kathleen DeLaurenti

head librarian, Arthur Friedheim Library, Peabody Institute


Tuesday November 10, 2020 4:30pm - 4:55pm EST
Concurrent 5
  Practices, Presentation

4:30pm EST

Collaborative Practice: Critical Information Literacies in Open Pedagogy
At its core, open pedagogy (OP) is teaching practices that facilitate the collaborative and transparent construction of knowledge made openly available through online communities. OP de-centers the instructor from the information expert to a facilitation role that supports student negotiation of ideas and transforms their learning into open knowledge sources (e.g. blogs, wikis, videos, etc.). With the introduction of critical information literacy to librarianship, instruction continues to teach how information is created, accessed, and used but also works to make visible the impacts of the social, political, and economic systems that influence what is created, how it is created, and how it is made accessible.

Using the lens of critical information literacy within librarianship, this session will provide examples of the integration of critical information literacy practices within the OP classroom, the kinds of information addressed to support students in these environments, and the transformative nature of these two complementary blended instructional methods.

Learning Outcomes:
Understand what open pedagogy entails in theory and practice
Understand what critical information literacy entails in theory and in practice
Evaluate how open pedagogy and critical information literacy are complimentary

Speakers
avatar for Erin Fields

Erin Fields

Open Education & Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of British Columbia
UBC


Tuesday November 10, 2020 4:30pm - 4:55pm EST
Concurrent 4
  The Field, Presentation

5:00pm EST

OER for Online and Emergency Remote Learning in Community Colleges
With the COVID-19 crisis, there is an urgent need for digital course materials to fill the gaps left by publishers’ textbooks, which are often not available as e-versions, either through the campus library’s reserve collection or otherwise. To address this need, community colleges in California and elsewhere are turning to Open Educational Resources (OER)—including open textbooks and ancillary resources—to build out their online course content. Through open licensing that allows faculty to integrate OER into their course management systems and to adapt the resources to meet learners where they are, these colleges and their faculty are finding the flexibility needed for emergency remote courses. At the same time, they are able to address requirements for culturally relevant, engaging materials for their learners in the online setting.

This session will present the findings from a Michelson 20MM Foundation Spark Grant study conducted by ISKME to explore how community colleges are utilizing OER to support the shift to online and remote learning in response to COVID-19. The session will feature presentation and discussion by Jodie Steeley, Fresno City College, on her college’s response to the COVID crises through the use of OER, and learnings from Fresno City faculty and student use cases that demonstrate implementation of the college’s OER-supported model for emergency remote learning.

Learning Outcomes:
Participants will understand and be able to identify tools related to: 1. Practical strategies for using OER to build online courses in course management systems and with other tools in the postsecondary context; 2. Considerations for utilizing OER to meet the needs for more inclusive, culturally relevant pedagogy in the online and emergency remote setting; 3. Policy and professional learning supports for utilizing OER for emergency remote and online learning in the postsecondary setting.

Speakers
avatar for Amee Evans Godwin

Amee Evans Godwin

VP, Research & Development, ISKME
VP, R&D at ISKME working in applied research and development focused on open educational practice, professional learning and collaboration. Founding Program Director of ISKME's digital public library, OER Commons. Develops new business opportunities and new program implementations... Read More →
avatar for Jodie Steeley

Jodie Steeley

Director of Distance Education & Instructional Technology, Jodie Steeley
avatar for Cynthia Jimes

Cynthia Jimes

Research Director, ISKME


Tuesday November 10, 2020 5:00pm - 5:25pm EST
Concurrent 1
  COVID-19, Presentation

5:00pm EST

Evoking Curiosity for Curated, Collaborative, and Consumer-Created Content
While Open Educational Resources (OERs) are adopted at rates comparable to traditional publishers in lower division courses, adoption lags behind in niche content areas and pre-professional courses of study. This session highlights efforts to review and increase the availability of OERs in pre-professional and professional training sequences across multiple US universities, with emphases on both curated and student-generated content.
Strategies presented during this session will include:
(1) The Behavior Analysis Matrix Project, curating and aligning limited available open access and open educational video resources with course competencies.
(2) The Task List Glossary Project, a project to crowd-source student generated examples of the professional principles across disciplines, cultural contexts, and learning histories
(3) The Open Behavior Artifacts Project, a project designed to support students as content creators in creating mixed format resources to describe and expand examples and reflect diverse student voices.
(4) The creation of Special Topics in Applied Behavior Analysis, an openly-licensed textbook created in partnership with graduate students through open enabled pedagogy, limiting the effort involved in creating a brand new resource while maximizing student learning.

These strategies, which employ inductive models for OER content creation, emphasize the intentionality of including experiences that represent the learning histories, cultures, and values of a wide variety of developing professionals. Applications of these strategies are discipline-universal, applicable across multiple subject areas.


Learning Outcomes:
Participants will be able to: describe examples of OER curation and student-generated creation, articulate the role of cultural context and anti-bias approaches, and consider ethical replication of similar strategies.

Speakers
avatar for Veronica Howard

Veronica Howard

Associate Professor, University of Alaska Anchorage
avatar for Rachel Potter

Rachel Potter

Director, Applied Behavior Analysis & Autism Studies, Mary Baldwin University & ABAI OER SIG
avatar for Maggie Pavone

Maggie Pavone

Assistant Professor of Behavior Analysis (ABAI OER SIG President), Lindenwood Univeristy & ABAI OER SIG


Tuesday November 10, 2020 5:00pm - 5:25pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Social Justice, Presentation

5:00pm EST

Open Education in Teacher Development: A Cross-Disciplinary Perspective
This panel discussion provides insights into the variety of ways that four educators who work in areas of teacher development and training have drawn on creative OER ideas over the last several years. Ways that institutional support provided infrastructure for creation and implementation of OER will be explored and discussed including: participation in an open education Professional Learning Community (PLC), use of library-based trainings and workshops taught by an open education librarian, and informal backchannels, social media, and digitally-based conversations to share ideas about OER with each other and colleagues. We define open education as an open sharing for education.

The first panelist will inform how science teacher candidates integrate interactive OERs to teach science. Teaching with the interactive OERs provides educational resources that successfully help to teach diverse students in science classrooms. The participants will have a list of the interactive OERs and a rubric to evaluate the various OERs for teaching science.

The second panelist will share about the recent growth of OER resources for ESL teaching, specifically for university level academic ESL. In addition, resource curation will be discussed as a knowledge-building activity that supports the ideals behind open resources, and provides ESL teachers with a wealth of relevant resources at their fingertips. Participants will gain access to some examples of student-curated resources and suggestions for helping students curate their own resources effectively.

The third panelist will discuss ways to use OERs to support virtual, hybrid, and face-to-face teaching in K-12 classrooms. Examples of teacher and student learning from the Mobile Maker Kits project, an OER providing interdisciplinary, standards-based making lessons, will be shared. Participants will engage in brainstorming goals for creating and sharing OERs for interdisciplinary teaching and learning.

The fourth panelist will share ideas related to creation of multimodal open access content through using podcasting and video (YouTube). Ways that the university-based Professional Learning Community helped support the creation and implementation of the microlearning podcast creation project will be outlined as well as the ways that the panelist sought out her own models of multimodal OERs provided progress in the creation of these resources and remixing in literacy teacher education.

Learning Outcomes:
Participants will learn about the ways that OER integrates into teacher education and training across multiple disciplines (teacher education, linguistics/TESOL, science education, and literacy education).
Participants will consider and reflect on the ways that institutional support (such as Professional Learning Community and OER Librarian support) provides opportunities for development of implementation of open access education and resource integration into courses as well as all disciplines

Speakers
avatar for Cynthia Kilpatrick

Cynthia Kilpatrick

Assistant Professor of Instruction, University of Texas at Arlington
Cynthia Kilpatrick is the graduate advisor for TESOL at The University of Texas at Arlington, and the Interim Director of UT Arlington's English Language Institute.
avatar for Peggy Semingson

Peggy Semingson

Associate Professor, The University of Texas at Arlington
avatar for Jiyoon Yoon

Jiyoon Yoon

Associate Professor, University of Texas at Arlington
avatar for Robin Jocius

Robin Jocius

Associate Professor, University of Texas at Arlington


Tuesday November 10, 2020 5:00pm - 5:25pm EST
Concurrent 4
  Strategies, Presentation

5:00pm EST

Strangers in a Strange Land: How We Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Our OER Colleagues
This panel provides the perspectives of faculty, staff, and administrators at a public community college on the implementation of a “zero-cost textbook”, two-year transfer degree or “z-degree”. Midway through implementation at Century College, the project faced significant challenges including rapid organizational change and previous miscommunication within the college about the project. After six months of implementation, the project had to be “reset” under leadership and staff new to the institution and the state college system. Rather than aggressively force project implementation under paths previously planned, the reset allowed a broader faculty task force to create paths forward that naturally drew upon existing faculty and staff expertise within the institution and the Minnesota State System. Communication was more broadly established, which, in turn, enabled greater data gathering on existing capacity to support open educational resources among faculty. The task force worked through issues of intellectual property and made recommendations for supporting faculty in ways consistent with institutional norms and practices. Task force members worked with mentors and informal contacts within the state system to learn from other institutions that successfully implemented “z-degrees” and how they met common barriers. Even though Century was not an early adopter in comparison to other colleges, this collaborative approach allowed the institution to make rapid progress in making open educational resourced courses available to students.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Explain how the context of an institution and a related higher education system may shape implementation of open educational resources.
2. Analyze the kinds of organizational dynamics that may challenge use of open educational resources.
3. Evaluate solutions to potential barriers in using open educational resources related to faculty compensation, intellectual property, and governance.
4. Create strategies to identify and create alliances to support use of open educational resources.

Speakers
avatar for Randi Madisen

Randi Madisen

Electronic Services Librarian, Century College
avatar for Eric Riedel

Eric Riedel

Dean of Nursing, CECT and Online Learning Excellence, Century College
Dr. Eric Riedel has served in administrative, teaching, and research roles in higher education for over 25 years with specific interests in assessment, online learning, and civic education. He is currently the Dean for Nursing, Continuing Education and Customized Training, and Online... Read More →
avatar for Kelly Donahue

Kelly Donahue

Faculty, Century College
avatar for Caroline Toscano

Caroline Toscano

Instructional Designer, Century College
avatar for Crystal De Kam

Crystal De Kam

Counselor, Century College


Tuesday November 10, 2020 5:00pm - 5:25pm EST
Concurrent 2
  Strategies, Presentation

5:30pm EST

Tea Time
"Tea time" is a break in scheduled programming when attendees can rest, practice self-care, or dive into networking or asynchronous sessions. There is no official programming during this time.

During this break, you can choose to participate in Tuesday Tea Time Trivia! Test your knowledge and have a chance at winning prizes from the #OpenEd20 store.

Alternatively, here is a set of themed lightning talks to consider. After tuning in to these short presentations, free to take the conversation to Discord and share your thoughts with others.

Social Justice:
Transforming the Lesson
Learner Empowerment through Canada's 94 Calls to Action
Classroom Culture: Fostering Inclusivity in the Digital World of ESL

Tuesday November 10, 2020 5:30pm - 5:55pm EST
All Together
  Community Connections, Break

5:30pm EST

Tuesday Tea Time Trivia
Trivia! Come play and win a prize.
The game will played through Kahoot, www.kahoot.it

Tuesday November 10, 2020 5:30pm - 5:55pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Community Connections, Activity

6:00pm EST

Tackling a Mammoth in Physics with the Help of Co-op Students
First- and second-year physics and engineering students enrolled in classical mechanics (statics and dynamics) courses have long been burdened with the cost of commercial textbooks and homework systems. Not only has the financial cost to students in North America been astronomical, but both teaching and learning have been impacted. Since classical mechanics has not changed in centuries, open textbooks seem like an obvious solution, however existing options lack enough practice problems of the quality and complexity found in commercial textbooks. Practising problem-solving is essential to learning these topics, so large sets of problems are required (e.g. a typical textbook contains 3000+ unique problems). Creating quality mechanics problems is very time-consuming, however. Students and educators have been forced to pay dearly for commercial textbook problems without the ability to modify or reuse them.

In this session, participants will hear from students and educators taking on the challenge of creating OER to ultimately eliminate the need for commercial textbooks. The presenters will discuss the approach, lessons learned and the important collaboration both cross-institutionally and cross-jurisdictionally.

Since June 2020, more than 400 problems have been developed for the Open Problem Library (OPL) in the open homework system (OHS) WeBWorK (currently being piloted for release in 2021) and integrated into the MechanicsMap open textbook (http://mechanicsmap.psu.edu). The presenters will discuss the rationale behind choosing this OHS.

But did we mention that all of this work has taken place during the COVID-19 pandemic?! With government subsidies to hire co-op students plus funding through BCcampus, six co-op students were hired to develop problems with supervision from two faculty members. This opportunity for students to gain valuable experience, earn an income and work remotely has been pivotal to their education and development during this difficult time. 

The presenters will share the larger goals and next steps of the project and how others can get involved. We hope to demonstrate that, through collaboration, student involvement and creativity, the goal is achievable.

Learning Outcomes:
Participants will be able to consider and appreciate the:
-benefits of student participation in OER creation
-benefits of engagement in cross-institution and cross-jurisdiction collaboration
-use of open source platforms (open homework systems in particular) for OER development and learning
-phased approach that can be taken to accomplish larger goals
-lessons learned in embarking on a large scale, dynamic OER project

Live Q&A info:
On Twitter #mammothOER
Google sheet:  http://bitly.ws/ao8t

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Kirkey

Jennifer Kirkey

Instructor, Douglas College
I have been teaching physics and astronomy for more than 30 years at the community college level. I do science outreach to elementary schools. I became an advocate for open textbooks about five years ago and am currently working on a project to make open physics and engineering problems... Read More →
avatar for Melanie Meyers

Melanie Meyers

Project Manager, BCcampus
I'm a Project Manager at BCcampus with responsibility for STEM and Business programs. My projects focus on developing Zero Textbook Cost (ZTC) programs in British Columbia as well as other OER initiatives that work toward eliminating textbook costs for students and support faculty... Read More →
avatar for Agnes d'Entremont

Agnes d'Entremont

Associate Professor of Teaching, University of British Columbia
Dr. Agnes d’Entremont is an Associate Professor of Teaching in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at UBC. She teaches courses in mechanics, including orthopaedic biomechanics and injury biomechanics. Her teaching-related interests include open educational resources (OER) and... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 6:00pm - 6:25pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Collaborations, Presentation

6:00pm EST

Hit a Wall? Practical Pathways When You Can’t Find the OER You Need
While the pandemic has brought about an increase in interest in OER textbooks, many faculty will initially hit a dead-end when looking for a replacement textbook. What best practices can librarians and instructional designers draw on to turn what could be a dead-end search into future OER win? While the pandemic has brought about an increase in interest in OER textbooks, many faculty will initially hit a dead-end when looking for a replacement textbook. As Open Education matures, the conversations that we have with faculty can drive larger curricular and infrastructural changes needed to support broader adoption of OER in higher education. This session is designed for those with introductory knowledge of OER and are interested in the best practices on collaborating with faculty and with taking their campus OER efforts to the next level. Listen and pose questions to a panel of OER advocates that have a combined 40+ years of experience with OER “dead-end” searches and solutions. Strategies they will discuss will include approaches to advocating for faculty publishing, faculty community support, non-textbook OER options, campus advocacy efforts, and more.

Learning Outcomes:
Participants will be able to 1) Describe, adapt and adopt strategies for converting OER search fails into successes 2) Support publishing OER efforts on their campus 3) Reimagine instructional design to incorporate non-traditional OER and 4) Brainstorm ways to effectively connect faculty with a network of support

Speakers
avatar for Lesley Farmer

Lesley Farmer

Professor of Library Media/Teacher Librarian Program Coordinator/CSU ICT Literacy Project Manager, California State University, Long Beach
Dr. Lesley Farmer, Professor at California State University (CSU) Long Beach, coordinates the Librarianship program. She also manages CSU’s ICT Literacy Project. Dr. Farmer chairs CSLA's Committee on Standards Integration and the Research TF. She chaired the International Federation... Read More →
avatar for Cyril Oberlander

Cyril Oberlander

Library Dean, Humboldt State University Library
Humboldt State University Press http://digitalcommons.humboldt.edu/
avatar for Bryan D. Berrett

Bryan D. Berrett

Director, Center for Faculty Excellence, Fresno State
Bryan Berrett has been a Deaf Studies faculty member since 1997 and currently is the Director of the Center for Faculty Excellence at Fresno State. The center provides faculty support with a team of instructional designers, faculty-driven learning communities, accessibility support... Read More →
avatar for Cristina Springfield

Cristina Springfield

OER Librarian, California State University, Dominguez HIlls
My passions include connecting people with information, issues surrounding digital privacy, the continual evolution of library services to support students, and open educational resources.


Tuesday November 10, 2020 6:00pm - 6:25pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Open Education 101, Presentation

6:00pm EST

Reimagining OERs in Humanities Courses: Best Practices for Literature, Mythology, Art History & More
This session will begin with several brief presentations of creative ways college faculty have used OERs in humanities courses. They will also share innovative ways of supplementing OERs with course materials that fall outside the public domain and creative commons licensing but still do not pass any costs on to students. The session will be open for attendees to ask questions and share their challenges, solutions, and innovations for reimagining how we do OER in the humanities.

Learning Outcomes:
Attendees will learn innovative ways to implement OERs in humanities courses (literature, mythology, art history, etc.) and to supplement OER materials using library, public domain, and online resources.

Speakers
avatar for Monica Fuglei

Monica Fuglei

English Department Chair, Arapahoe Community College
avatar for Susan Stafinbil

Susan Stafinbil

English Faculty/CDHE OER Ambassador, Arapahoe Community College
I teach English, literature, and humanities courses at Arapahoe Community College (ACC) in Littleton, Colorado.  I've been working with OER for several years thanks to support from the Colorado Department of Higher Education and ACC's OER Advisory Committee.I'm excited by the range... Read More →
avatar for Mitch Cota

Mitch Cota

Librarian, Arapahoe Community College
I am a Reference Librarian for ACC. I am interested in OER for Community Colleges.
avatar for Karen Danielson

Karen Danielson

Professor of Art History, Chair Visual Arts and Graphic Design, Community College of Denver


Tuesday November 10, 2020 6:00pm - 6:25pm EST
Concurrent 2
  Practices, Presentation

6:30pm EST

Where in the World is Your OER Content?: Using Analytics for your Portfolio
You may not know exactly where the content goes unless you have clues and tools to help you find where it all goes. In this session, we will explore the questions of how to track OER that may help faculty promotion and tenure and solve some of the challenges that surround the OER community. This session will showcase technology tools with analytics tools that will help faculty members create a narrative about their OER content impact. Such tools include utilizing well-known library database tools, social media platform analytics, and other OER repositories to discover such impact.

While there is consensus that OER provides many benefits by lowering costs and increasing access to knowledge, there are some OER issues and challenges that still need to be addressed. How do we know when our OER content has been downloaded, used, or modified? Can we determine when someone violates Creative Commons licensing? The following session will cover why faculty members should consider answering these questions and what strategies can they choose to discover such answers.

Learning Outcomes:
Learners will be able to:
1. discuss issues regarding connect OER content to tenure and promotion.
2. identify databases with analytics to measure OER content usage.
3. use analytics as an enhancement to resumes and CVs.

Speakers
avatar for Ellie Svoboda

Ellie Svoboda

OER Graduate Assistant, Strauss Health Sciences Library
I am currently a graduate student in the LIS program at DU. I am passionate about OER and the open movement in general.
avatar for Michael Lampe

Michael Lampe

Senior Instructional Designer, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
avatar for Ben Harnke

Ben Harnke

Librarian, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus
avatar for Natalia Vergara

Natalia Vergara

Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus School of Medicine
avatar for David Bourne

David Bourne

Associate Professor, CU SSPPS
avatar for Jessica Hitt-Laustsen

Jessica Hitt-Laustsen

Education Manager, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus


Tuesday November 10, 2020 6:30pm - 6:55pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Challenges, Presentation

6:30pm EST

OER and Open Pedagogy in a Native Hawaiian Place of Learning
This session focuses on ongoing ʻŌiwi (Native Hawaiian), Pacific Islander, and Indigenous-centered OER and Open Pedagogy projects at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, a university designated as a Native Hawaiian Place of Learning. Hawaiʻi Review arts journal, a Native Hawaiian-led journal at UH Mānoa, engages in multiple ʻŌiwi-centered OER and Open Pedagogy projects, including the Mauna Kea Syllabus Project, inspired by the Standing Rock Syllabus and the BLM syllabus. The editorial board of Hawaiʻi Review comprises ʻŌiwi, Pacific Islander, and Indigenous women, men, and queer people who recognize the politics of publishing and have intentionally created outreach projects to encourage ʻŌiwi scholarship: creative writing residencies, and an OER textbook for English Studies and Humanities.

The Mauna Kea Syllabus contributes to the growing body of scholarship produced around the efforts of Kanaka Maoli to protect their mountain Mauna a Wākea from continued desecration. In Native Hawaiian epistemology and ontology, Mauna Kea is the piko (umbilical connection and center of Hawaiian worldview). The most recent proposal of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) desires to build a 4.1 billion dollar observatory eighteen stories high in a designated conservation zone ignoring numerous environmental concerns; the mauna is part of the national Hawaiian lands set aside for Kanaka Maoli, exacerbating unresolved land and sovereignty claims.

Hawaiʻi Review is creating an OER Textbook grounded in Hawaiʻi-based pedagogies and community-centered forms of scholarship and research. The Hawaiʻi Review OER textbook will promote Hawaiian epistemologies through several important components: 1) introduction to teaching writing here in Hawaiʻi, 2) selection of teaching curriculum and literary materials that will come from Hawaiian writers, be situated in Hawaiʻi, and/or contain Hawaiian themes; 3) lesson plans to showcase possibilities for ʻŌiwi to share their curriculum to a wider audience, thus ensuring a Hawaiian Place of Teaching.

Learning Outcomes:
*Discuss the OER activities and Open pedagogies of Hawaiʻi Review arts journal and the Mauna Kea Syllabus Project
*Consider the role of OER and Open Pedagogy in ʻŌiwi (Native Hawaiian), Pacific Islander, and Indigenous learning systems
*Access resources on equity and liberation in education with a Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, and Indigenous focus
*Analyze institutional programs at their own institutions for potential Indigenous equity projects

Speakers
avatar for LynleyShimat Lys

LynleyShimat Lys

PhD Student, Graduate Assistant, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
avatar for Māhealani Ahia

Māhealani Ahia

PhD Student, Graduate Assistant, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa


Tuesday November 10, 2020 6:30pm - 6:55pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Social Justice, Presentation

6:30pm EST

How Open is It? Developing a Framework for "Open Pragmatism" through Examination of OpenCourseWare
While open licensing is a foundational aspect of open educational resources, there are several "factors" that educators must use to achieve openness in their course design. This study builds on the previous work of the authors' conceptual framework, titled "Open Enough?," for evaluating the level of openness within Open CourseWare (OCW) (McNally & Christiansen, 2019). In the previous work, the authors proposed eight factors that educators should consider when undertaking OCW development. The authors also argued that these eight factors could be used to assess the openness of existing OCW. The goal of this pilot study was to answer the following question:

1) Is the "Open Enough" framework and its eight factors robust enough to analyze (or measure) the level of openness in an existing OCW?

2) Are additional, or modified, factors necessary?

3) Are the factors practical measures for the assessment of existing OCW? Are there particular factors which are too subjective or too broad?

For this analysis, the authors randomly selected five recent open courses from two prominent OCW databases - TU Delft and MIT OpenCourseWare - for a total of ten OCW. Each course was assessed on each of the eight factors which included Copyright/Open Licensing Frameworks, Accessibility/Usability Formatting, Language, Support Costs, Assessment, Digital Distribution, File Format, and Cultural Considerations. The level of openness of each factor was classified as Closed, Mixed, or Most Open - recognizing that these buckets of analysis are broad and could further be subdivided.

In general, the "Open Enough" framework was fairly effective for determining openness in existing OCW with some caveats. The Cultural Considerations and Usability factors were ultimately too subjective to measure and were subsequently removed from the revised version of the framework. The analysis of these OCW showed that openness among the sampled courses was inconsistent. Some of the factors were consistently open throughout the sampled courses while other factors, specifically Language, Materials Costs, and File Format, were quite closed. Overall, there was a lack of editable materials that led the authors to reconsider what openness should be in the context of OCW. The results of the analysis were used to revise the framework. This pilot study served as a proof of concept for using their framework as a tool for analysis.


Learning Outcomes:
After attending this presentation, participants will

- develop a better understanding of the multitude of factors that influence openness, beyond copyright.

- be able to articulate how to address OCW development pragmatically and holistically

- understand the limitations of OCW and which factors of 'openness' require the largest time commitment to implement.
Additional resources
- Previous paper- Google Slides

Speakers
avatar for Michael McNally

Michael McNally

Associate Professor, University of Alberta
Michael B. McNally is an Assistant Professor at the School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Alberta. His research interests include intellectual property and its alternatives including open educational resources, user-generated content, radio spectrum management... Read More →
avatar for Erik Christiansen

Erik Christiansen

Assistant Professor/Librarian, Mount Royal University
Erik G. Christiansen is an Assistant Professor/Librarian at Mount Royal University in Calgary, Alberta. His research interests include open pedagogy and OER, scaffolded information literacy instruction, and Web accessibility and usability for libraries. Previously, he worked as an... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 6:30pm - 6:55pm EST
Concurrent 2
  The Field, Presentation

7:00pm EST

Late Show
Each day will end with an informal conversation with the organizers and members of the conference community. The Late Show will debrief the day so far, provide tips on what’s ahead, and opportunities to get to know different perspectives in the field. Tune into the Zoom meeting to participate!

Our Tuesday late show with showcase exciting OER work happening at Ohio State and CUNY.

Speakers
avatar for Stacy Katz

Stacy Katz

Open Resources Librarian, Lehman College, CUNY
avatar for Amanda Larson

Amanda Larson

Affordable Learning Instructional Consultant, The Ohio State University

Planners
avatar for Emily Ragan

Emily Ragan

Associate Professor, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Excited about reimagining effective education. Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and OER Coordinator at Metropolitan State University of Denver
avatar for Hailey Babb

Hailey Babb

Open Education Coordinator, SPARC
avatar for Jasmine Roberts

Jasmine Roberts

Lecturer/Teaching Professor, The Ohio State University
Jasmine Roberts is an educator, speaker, writer and strategic communication professional. She joined the School of Communication at The Ohio State University in 2012, where she teaches upper level undergraduate courses in the areas of communication campaigns and strategic communication... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 7:00pm - 7:25pm EST
All Together
  Community Connections, Conversation

7:29pm EST

Taco Tuesday
Share your favorite taco recipe on Discord and/or vote for the one you want to see made by liking/reacting to the posts! Tiffani will livestream cooking the recipe with the most likes from that day for dinner that night, and the winner will receive a prize!
Where: Discord/Zoom
Submissions due: Tuesday at 4:00 PM ET
Taco Tuesday livestream: Tuesday at 7:30 PM ET

Planners
avatar for Tiffani Reardon

Tiffani Reardon

Affordable Learning Georgia Program Manager, University System of Georgia
Talk to me about: instructional design, tech com/writing, accessibility, oer, open pedagogy, dogs, cats, geek stuff


Tuesday November 10, 2020 7:29pm - 7:44pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Community Connections, Activity

7:30pm EST

Unlikely Partners: Harnessing Student Enthusiasm to Create an OER Grant
In 2019, following the Carnegie Foundation's reclassification of Elon University as a national research university, Elon's Carol Grotnes Belk Library made growing the understanding and presence of OER on campus a chief priority. Despite some individual success with faculty receiving state-funded grants, Belk Library struggled to translate those discrete achievements into significant, widespread interest.

Unbeknownst to Belk's librarians, Elon's Student Government Association (SGA) was working in parallel to address textbook costs. However, their attempts to manage those concerns stalled due to annual membership turnover and a lack of exposure to the open education movements and their foundational precepts. A chance meeting between two librarians and a persistent SGA representative brought the two campaigns together. Combining the librarians' experience and knowledge with student enthusiasm and influence proved to be a successful formula: in the spring of 2020, Elon approved their joint proposal for a faculty OER grant program.

We offer lessons learned about earning administrative buy-in and maintaining that support; focusing student interest and enthusiasm by expanding their understanding of OER; and building multi-interest coalitions to create sustainable open education initiatives.

Learning Outcomes: Students sense the value of free, open resources; lack of support for OER may stem from an insufficient vocabulary for articulating these ideas. If educators provide that missing context, students can voice their support and faculty/staff can grow their OER coalition. Our case study demonstrates a 180-degree turn from failure to success in implementing OER initiatives when students act as co-leaders.

Speakers
avatar for Betty Garrison

Betty Garrison

Business Research Librarian, Elon University
Hello! I'm the business librarian at Elon University. I've spent 22 years learning how students become information literate, what makes them curious to learn more, and how to use in-class hands-on exercises to stimulate interest in accomplishing better research.
avatar for Jesse Akman

Jesse Akman

Science Research Librarian, Elon University


Tuesday November 10, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Collaborations, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Creating a STEAM Textbook as a Learning Tool
Creating textbook chapters is time-consuming and, in general, does not include the target audience. One solution is to have the students create the material assuring accessibility. This presentation describes a class in which undergraduate students worked together to create textbook chapters in behavioral neuroscience. During last summer the work became a STEAM project supported by the Mellon Foundation in which I collaborated with an art professor and student artists to illustrate the work. Students learned how to acquire, synthesize, and describe complex, abstract concepts in text and illustration. The professors learned how to bridge the gap between their disciplines.
Deliverables also included an art exhibition and a peer-refereed publication.

Learning Outcomes: How utilizing undergraduates in the creation of an open-access textbook benefits the students
How both artists and scientists benefit from working together.
How librarians can assist with the process.

Speakers
avatar for jennifer swann

jennifer swann

Professor, Lehigh University
I have been a professor of Biological Sciences at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, PA for over 25 years. My career began in circadian rhythms where I worked to identify multiple circadian and food entertainable oscillators.  I then moved to neuroendocrinology and behavior.  My work... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Practices, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Faculty Cohort Program: Semester-Long Learning Community on OER
In spring and summer 2020, LOUIS: The Louisiana Library Network hosted two rounds of the LOUIS OER Commons Faculty Cohort Program. This competitive program enabled faculty from across the state to participate in a semester-long online learning community. The program intended to create an environment of support and shared learning as faculty explored and deepened their knowledge of OER locally in terms of their discipline and institutions, and broadly in terms of teaching, learning, and the higher ed landscape.

This session will provide a review of the program, from its intent to the call for proposals to the learning community design to the final deliverables and assessment. Participants interested in building community around open education online using existing resources will gain an understanding of this model so that they might be able to apply it to their context.

Learning Outcomes: Participants will be able to describe what a faculty learning community is.

Participants will be able to articulate elements of the faculty cohort structure that they could apply to their context.

Speakers
avatar for Emily Frank

Emily Frank

Affordable Learning Administrator, La. Board of Regents - LOUIS


Tuesday November 10, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Practices, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

How Distance Learners Create Open Online Support Communities on Twitter
Introduction: As more education pivots online and many students experience distance learning for the first time, I will outline how distance learners use open platforms to build their own online learning communities and how effective these may be. All students should be able to fully participate in the exchange of knowledge regardless of location or stage of their studies. An open platform like Twitter which is simple to use and available at no extra cost to students can support this.
Student identity: While open access online distance learning has seen steady growth, there remains evidence that open education distance learners have higher drop-out rates and many students feel isolated. OpenEd Distance learners often have other important roles alongside studying such as work or caring roles leading to a loss of student identity. Research shows Twitter can provide a platform for distance learners to develop this student identity in an open space benefiting students and HE institutions.
Benefits of Twitter for students: Research on how distance learners and full time campus based students use Twitter to interact with their peers show that the interaction is beneficial both to the students' feelings of association with the course but also their understanding of the topics. Examples of this research and findings will be outlined.
Existing research limitations:
1.Focused on analysing interview and questionnaire data with very limited use of qualitative research on the actual 'tweets' or messages produced by students on Twitter. Tweet analysis is possible with software programs which analyse key words and phrases being used as well as sentiment analysis.
2.Limited network analysis: Power remains an issue in online communities and to ensure a truly ‘open’ educational environment, it is important to study whether power hierarchies remain within these new online study communities. Despite the capability of this research, there are limited examples within educational settings.
3.Large-scale tweet analysis in educational settings: Software programs have made large-scale analysis of over tens of millions of tweets possible and this is regularly carried out in relation to political events but rarely within educational settings.
My doctoral research project: It is therefore recommended that further research is considered to study the tweets generated by OpenEd distance learners in open platforms such as Twitter using both qualitative and quantitative methods.

Learning Outcomes: A literature review on studies showing how distance learners can use microblogging sites such as Twitter to create open support communities.
•Can social media offer Open access distance learners an open space to ‘meet’ other students?
•How can Twitter interaction between students benefit them and HE institutions?
•What research has been done to test this?
•What does the research show?
•How has this research been carried out and what are its limitations?
•What further research is required?

Speakers
avatar for Olivia Kelly

Olivia Kelly

Doctoral Researcher, The Open University
I have been working as an Associate Lecturer with the Open University for 13 years in a variety of 1st year (Level 1) modules. I am now in my second year of an EdD (Doctorate in Education) where I am researching how some distance learners use Twitter to reach out to each other and... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Practices, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Use it, Adapt it! New Tutorial on APA Citation
If you’re looking for an open educational resource for learning APA Style citation, this tutorial may be for you! This 30-45 minute self-paced, interactive tutorial created by the University of Alberta Library provides an introduction to APA citation guidelines, 7th edition. The tutorial also explores why citation is important and elements of common source types. The APA Style Citation Tutorial is designed with undergraduate Education students in mind, but as an OER it's available for everyone to use and adapt!

Published through Open Education Alberta, the APA Style tutorial is the first time the open textbook and OER publishing service has been used to develop library teaching materials through the Pressbooks platform. The tutorial was created and published during the shift to increased online learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic and local budget cuts to education funding, which emphasized our goals of sustainability and openness for the tutorial. The APA Style tutorial was recently featured in an article in Open Shelf magazine, which discusses the development of the tutorial.

Learning Outcomes
By examining the APA citation tutorial, conference attendees’ will be able to:
  1. Explore an interactive, self-paced open educational resource (OER) for learning APA Style citation,
  2. Discover an example of an OER created in Pressbooks open-source publishing software,
  3. Use or adapt this APA Style citation tutorial for your teaching and resource needs.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Adams

Sarah Adams

Sessional Librarian (former position), University of Alberta


Tuesday November 10, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Practices, Showcase Gallery

7:30pm EST

Use of Digital Reusable Assignments to Supplement and Support OER Adoption and Increase Student Engagement in a Human Physiology Course
Adoption of OER materials presents unique challenges for courses that rely heavily on images and videos for the conveyance of complex concepts, as these materials may be lacking in these areas. A challenge that is not unique to this course is increasing student engagement. In order to tackle these challenges simultaneously, we sought to implement the use of two types of digital reusable assignments in the Principles of Human Physiology course. The initial assignments were designed, in part, to have the students identify videos and images under a Creative Commons (CC) license that illustrate major course themes. Specifically, core topics that students typically struggle with and are difficult to convey without visual aids. In the second digital reusable assignment, students worked in groups to generate their own media resource on a specific topic. Students were allowed to choose the format of their resource. Media modalities included, songs, comics, graphics, posters, podcasts, videos, etc.. For both assignments, these media could be pooled and used to augment the teaching resources provided with the OER textbook. We hoped that this would improve the available teaching resources and give students a feeling of investment in the course and permanence to their work.
To educate students about copyright and their rights as authors, the librarian assigned to the course visited the class at the beginning of the semester to share an online guide explaining how to find and identify open access resources, including videos. Later on, the librarian offered a required workshop where students rights as authors were discussed and where they were offered the opportunity to sign a release form for their final exercise assigning a CC license to their work. Students’ decisions were kept in sealed envelopes until grading was finished, and only then shared with the professor. Links to the course guide and release form will be shared during the presentation, as well as examples of student work with assigned CC licenses.

Learning Outcomes: After viewing this lighting talk viewers will be able to: Create an assignment that allows students to identify open access images and videos that facilitate understanding of complex topics. Create an assignment that allows students to create open educational resources that could be incorporated into future iterations of the course. Plan how to address authors rights and FERPA permissions with students. Access examples of students work and an example FERPA permission form.

Speakers
avatar for Moriana Garcia

Moriana Garcia

STEM and Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Rochester
avatar for Jon Holz

Jon Holz

Associate Prof. of Instruction, University of Rochester


Tuesday November 10, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Practices, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Ethical Dilemmas in an Open Technical Communication Textbook: Lessons in Audience Awareness
Sarah Lambert provided us with a thorough analysis of OER literature, resolving that it is “aligned to social justice principles, starting with the first UNESCO definition of [OER]” (2018). Open education is both grounded in and positioned well for social justice progress, in more ways than one. But what happens when your attempts to challenge students with analyzing social justice issues in your OER are flagged for insensitivity by students?

When the Open Technical Communication team began development of its highly successful textbook, we were working to achieve social justice-oriented goals both explicitly and implicitly. Explicitly, we were working to create a resource that would provide an essential skill to anyone who wished to gain it, regardless of social status. With textbook adoption in at least 14 states and large download numbers in other countries, this initial goal has been and continues to be met.

On the other hand, we worked to make our text inclusive and representative of the wide variety of people and cultures in the U.S.—with encouragement to readers to learn about and respect global cultures. We were surprised, then, when one of our ethics case studies was flagged by a student as insensitive. Based on real events, these case studies were provided in the textbook as a way for faculty to touch on ethical problems related to social justice issues, such as mascots named after Native Americans and discrimination against people on the basis of race, gender, religion, and sexual orientation. These case studies of unethical behavior were designed so that students were challenged to analyze them and propose ethical solutions.

Hodgekinson-Williams and Trotter advocate for “’re-acculturation’…which would respect alternative epistemic positions and acknowledge alternative authorities on what is considered to be worthwhile knowledge and dispositions” (2018). In this video, we will raise the question of how to share ethics cases in this rapidly changing cultural environment that is the U.S. while also respecting that some examples may be too close to home for a student to analyze objectively.

Lambert, S. R. (2018). Changing our (dis)course: A distinctive social justice aligned definition of open education. Journal of Learning for Development, 5 (3).
Hodgkinson-Williams, C. A. and Trotter, H. (2018). A social justice framework for understanding open educational resources and practices in the global south. Journal of Learning for Development, 5

Learning outcomes:
  • Participants will be able to identify various definitions of open educational resources and how they relate to social justice
  • Participants will be able to identify an OER titled Open Technical Communication
  • Participants will be able to describe the complications of ancillary materials that asked students to analyze ethical dilemmas
  • Participants will be able to explain the lessons the creators learned about levels of social justice in open educational resources

Speakers
avatar for Tamara Powell

Tamara Powell

Director, KSU CHSS ODE, Kennesaw State University
student success in online courses, teaching online, faculty development for online and hybrid teaching, instructional technology, how much they love their pets, favorite beaches, dancing to '80s music
avatar for Tiffani Reardon

Tiffani Reardon

Affordable Learning Georgia Program Manager, University System of Georgia
Talk to me about: instructional design, tech com/writing, accessibility, oer, open pedagogy, dogs, cats, geek stuff


Tuesday November 10, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Social Justice, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Transforming the lesson
In this discussion, examples of small steps taken to transform the traditional lesson into an open and inclusive learning experience will be shared. Participants will be invited to challenge the process. This session provides participants an opportunity to explore what they could do in their practices to achieve open and inclusive learning spaces for all their learners.

Learning Outcomes: Ideas to transforming lessons to become open and inclusive for all students

Speakers
avatar for Carolee Clyne

Carolee Clyne

Open Education Advisor/PhD Candidate, BCcampus/University of Northern British Columbia
Carolee has been supporting faculty in higher education for over 20 years in a variety of roles including computer, library systems, web support, instructional design and registrar systems. Modeling life long learning, Carolee is presently a doctoral candidate at the University of... Read More →
avatar for William Gottschall

William Gottschall

Instructor (Sociology, Criminology, Women's Studies and Anthropology, College of New Caledonia


Tuesday November 10, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Social Justice, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Campus Innovation, System Support, and External Partners: Building a Sustainable Spanish Project
As a portion of its 2018-2019 funding model to drive the adoption of open educational resources (OER) in SUNY’s general education, large-enrollment courses, SUNY OER Services solicited applications from SUNY campuses and faculty interested in authoring and creating OER. These applications targeted creating OER in content areas where OER was lacking or insignificant.

Four faculty members from and an instructional designer from SUNY Oneonta received funding to support the development of OER courses for Spanish I and Spanish II. SUNY Oneonta’s instructors wanted to create a resource for three introductory classes, Spanish I, Spanish II, and Elementary Spanish Conversations. Their goal was to create a resource that teaches Spanish through the communicative approach, where learners are encouraged to speak and write in Spanish. Learners will use their natural language acquisition strategies.

Through a partnership with Lumen Learning, SUNY Oneonta’s team ensured their content met the needs of SUNY Oneonta’s students and SUNY students but also the national need for Spanish language OER. The authors were able to define the project, create the chapter outlines, and do the most creative work. Lumen Learning used its network to develop additional activities, question sets aligned to the text, and commission voice actors to read the scripts that the authors created. After this one year initial creation period has finished, Lumen Learning will take over the long term maintenance of the text and future updates through its continuous improvement program. Spanish 1 and Spanish 2 are available in both SUNY’s Ready to Adopt catalog and Lumen Learning’s catalog as a Waymaker course.

The lessons learned from this project are that the combination of technical support, high-quality content, and integration into existing support structures allows campus teams to focus on the parts of the OER project that are tightly aligned with existing roles and expertise.

Learning Outcomes: Celebrate successes in OER creation from a panelist of authors, instructors, an instructional designer, and outside support.

Discuss from a variety of viewpoints the effects of partnership on the project and sustainability of the book.

Consider the need for continuous improvement of OER materials, and how the college, system, and partners are incentivized.

Share models that can be repeated for future projects.

Speakers
avatar for Ed Beck

Ed Beck

Instructional Designer, SUNY Oneonta


Tuesday November 10, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Strategies, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Providing no-cost, sustainable learning materials for organic chemistry students
This session will describe the conversion in all sections of Organic Chemistry I & II from a traditional hard-copy textbook to a free, open-source textbook. All students have access to the book through the university's learning management system. Assessment of student and faculty satisfaction, as well as representative student performance and retention, will be provided.

Learning Outcomes: Learning outcomes for the project include (1) the adoption of a no-cost OER textbook, (2) the alignment of the OER resource and supplementary materials with the course objectives, and (3) the assessment of developed materials to measure their effectiveness in student satisfaction, faculty satisfaction, student performance, and student retention.

Speakers
avatar for Dawn (Nikki) Cannon-Rech

Dawn (Nikki) Cannon-Rech

Librarian AC, Georgia Southern University Libraries
Research services librarian and liaison to College of Science and Mathematics.
avatar for Christine Whitlock

Christine Whitlock

Professor, Georgia Southern University
avatar for Shainaz Landge

Shainaz Landge

Assistant Professor in Organic Chemistry, Georgia Southern University


Tuesday November 10, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Strategies, Showcase Gallery

7:30pm EST

Student-created Open Educational Resources in a First-year Writing Context
Several recent studies have investigated the great promise of student-created open educational resources (Randal et al. 2013; Azzam et al. 2017; Wiley et al. 2017). Often, these student-created items focus on developing "renewable" assignments that offer utility to future students. This study builds on previous research by reporting on a case-in-progress of first-year writing students adapting their research papers into public-facing, open-access educational resources. Specifically, this lightning talk will detail the struggles and successes of implementing literature-based best practices as well as present early stages of public perception to the student-created OER.

Learning Outcomes: Viewers of this lightning talk will be prompted to explore the following questions:
1. Does student-created OER content contribute to the popular perception that OER are "Not-high-quality"? (Allen and Seaman 2016)
2. In what ways are students uniquely capable of producing accessible OER?
3. How can assignments built to be thrown away after completion be adapted for open education?

Speakers
avatar for Jason Godfrey

Jason Godfrey

PhD Student, University of Michigan
Hello! I'm Jason, and I do research about first-year writing. Traditionally, it generates a lot of thrown-out homework and skills that, at best, "transfer" to another class. I'm investigating the ways that OER could provide an opportunity for first-year writing to generate meaningful... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Strategies, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Studying an Affordable Learning Program with Data: PALNI’s Plan, Tools, and Results
Studying an affordable learning program through data can help with benchmarking, reporting, communication, and marketing. The Private Academic Library Network of Indiana (PALNI) is a consortium supporting 24 private institutions across Indiana through the PALSave affordable learning program. PALNI created a data plan to gather data demonstrating the need for the PALSave program, its impact, and to further gather information about the use of zero cost resources at private colleges in Indiana.

Learning Outcomes: Understand the value of data in OER programs
Learn about PALNI’s data approach
Know that PALNI’s methods are available for adaptation

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Hurford

Amanda Hurford

Scholarly Communications Director, Private Academic Library Network Of Indiana (PALNI)
avatar for Erin Milanese

Erin Milanese

Affordable Learning Project Coordinator/Head of Learning Technologies, PALNI/Goshen College


Tuesday November 10, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Strategies, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

The 5Rs+2, the Rights of Learners to Read and Reach OER
OER is framed by the 5Rs, the rights to retain, ruse, revise, remix and redistribute, the rights of creators. The emphasis on the rights of creators is natural as the concepts were adopted by David Wiley from developers of open software. Today as we talk about open pedagogy where OER is a principal support of student learning, it becomes clear that 5Rs are not enough, we need to focus on rights that support learners. We must include the right to REACH and the right to READ. The right to REACH was the original impetus for OER as the cost of textbooks meant that many students just did not have access to their most used and important educational resource. Yet cost alone is far too narrow a base to displace commercial offerers who have responded to students refusal to buy expensive books with pedagogically damaging (and still expensive, though less so) textbook rental and inclusive access coupled to licenses for homework systems that attract instructors. The COVID disaster has also brought home that REACHING educational materials requires them to be available in multiple formats so that all students can have access at no cost or minimal cost. Factors that make it difficult for students to READ materials that they have access to can be broadly delineated as physical causes such as low vision, mental ones such as dyslexia or cultural ones often encountered by minorities or immigrants. These require paths to customization be built into OER systems. At the beginning, creators, as was the case for open software, were both experts and guides through the thicket of offerings. OER librarians and referatory/repository builders have taken on the task of directing users to appropriate OER and encouraging instructors to become creators and users. To meet their goals OER libraries must coherently integrate the entire curriculum, not just high enrollment introductory courses and be easily extendable with new software, distribution channels and, of course, courseware including not only texts but many decorations thereof such as annotations and homework systems. OER projects have been under pressure develop business models and sustainability plans. While serving the needs of students are implicitly the drivers for Open Ed and OER, there is a major benefit to make it explicit and discuss the best ways of doing so. Education, Open Education and Open Educational Resource projects are better envisioned as a gift culture than a commercial one.

Learning Outcomes: This proposal argues that OER has to explicitly focus on student needs. A number of conditions for doing so are discussed. The conclusion is that this is poorly done as commercial enterprises with business and sustainability plans but rather education, and thus OER projects are better envisioned as gift cultures where valuables are not traded or sold, but rather given without an explicit agreement rewards.

Speakers
avatar for Joshua Halpern

Joshua Halpern

Outreach Team Chair, LibreTexts
Josh Halpern is the Outreach Team Chair at the LibreTexts Project and is interested in discussions about how LibreTexts can support OER globally. LibreTexts is not only one of the largest OER textbook repositories but also provides tools foreasy and quick customization of books across... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Strategies, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

The Student OER Advocacy Training Guide: A look into Developing Sustainable, Inclusive Internship Practices
In the Fall of 2018, Salt Lake Community College’s Open SLCC Team explored the opportunity to participate in the College’s Campus Internship Program to raise student visibility of OERs. This partnership resulted in the creation of the OER Student Advocacy and Outreach Internship, which led to the development of the Student OER Advocacy Training (SOAT) Guide. The SOAT Guide’s goals were to help interns develop skills related to advocacy within the context of Open SLCC and to establish sustainability and consistency within the internship in the long-term. Alongside these overarching goals, the interns would also develop information literacy skills and career-oriented transferrable skills.

The SOAT Guide was reconceptualized in 2019 to support interns from diverse backgrounds, especially to create a guide that was inclusive and rooted in the desire to provide equitable access to any student in the internship program. Open pedagogical practices were introduced and the presentation of information literacy concepts was developed through the use of the Association of College and Research Libraries’ Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. The result was the creation of an OER that was scalable, easy to update, modular, and explicitly integrated renewable assignments and information literacy into the internship program.

The redesigned SOAT Guide is self-paced with 15 modules. These modules cover internship onboarding and provide a basic introduction to OER, SLCC’s OER initiative, and an introduction to signature assignments. This is typically achieved at the pace of one module per week during the semester. However, this process is flexible, allowing the ability to adjust the content to the intern’s experiences, aptitude, or estimated internship eligibility. At the end of each semester, the intern is required to complete a signature assignment related to the OER Advocacy and the work readiness skills identified at the beginning of the semester. The renewable assignment offers the program an element of sustainability while providing the intern with the opportunity to share their unique experiences and perspectives.

In this demonstration, we will share extracts from the SOAT Guide set to be released at the end of 2020 and a Salt Lake Community College Student Release Form developed to support the best practices within the SOAT Guide.

Learning Outcomes: Following this demonstration, the conference participants will gain an understanding of the inclusive benefits of Open Pedagogical Practices and strategies for establishing long-term sustainability within OER Internship Programs.

Speakers
avatar for Jen Hughes

Jen Hughes

Archives, New Media & Educational Initiatives Librarian, Salt Lake Community College
I'm the Archives, New Media, and Educational Initiatives Librarian at Salt Lake Community College (SLCC) in Salt Lake City, Utah. Since starting at SLCC in 2009, I have worked in the areas of archives, new media, institutional repositories, copyright, and educational initiatives... Read More →
avatar for Andrea Scott

Andrea Scott

Operations Associate, Faculty Development and Educational Initiatives, Chair, Open SLCC Advisory Com, Salt Lake Community College
I'm the Faculty Development and Educational Initiatives Operations Associate and Chair of the Open SLCC Advisory Committee at Salt Lake Community College (SLCC). I have worked with the Open SLCC team since 2014. My primary role consists of coordinating the OER Initiative, management... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Strategies, Showcase Gallery

7:30pm EST

French-Language OER in Québec: Challenges and Opportunities
A recent report by Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) indicates that only 15% of French-language institutions mentioned any involvement in OER compared to 40% of English-language institutions in Canada.

In the primarily French-speaking province of Québec, OER development in higher education is relatively limited but there have been a number of initiatives recently to address the issue.

This lightning talk will discuss some of the challenges facing OER development in Québec, demonstrating OER advocacy in another language is so much more than just direct translations of resources, but requires significant time and efforts tailoring to the local context.

As well, two OER initiatives in the province will be highlighted: a joint project of 4 universities on the development of high-quality OER, as well as a network of OER advocates on the dissemination and sharing of knowledge and expertise.


Speakers
avatar for Chloe Lei

Chloe Lei

Teaching & Research Librarian, Engineering & Computer Science, Concordia University (Montréal, Canada)
avatar for Jean-Michel Lapointe

Jean-Michel Lapointe

PhD Student & Academic Librarian, Université du Québec à Montréal


Tuesday November 10, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  The Field, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

OER & the Digital Learning Innovation Trends Report
The Digital Learning Innovation Trends report identifies the 10 most prominent trends in digital learning. The report, published in 2020 by OLC and DETA, stemmed from the Every Learner Everywhere Network and its initiatives. It was developed using OLC Digital Learning Innovation Award submissions plus a review of documents produced by industry leaders, national organizations advancing technology in learning, journals and peer-reviewed research, news and media sources, and prominent research centers. While research indicates that OER is one of the top trends in digital learning, the findings about open resources are not exactly what one would expect.

To maximize the potential of OER to support digital learning, it is important to examine not just existing implementation and utilization, but to empirically link these initiatives with student success. Combining our expertise and experiences, we can better identify effective actions as well as gaps in research and practice to shape a better digital learning experience and support more students in their learning endeavors. Further, reaching others through our research can propel technology development and utilization, as well as further advance OER integration with active learning platforms.

Watch our lightning talk highlighting the Trends Report, the surprise findings about OER, and get insider information and preliminary results on more empirical research on OER that the same teams are working on today. In this session you’ll hear from some of the top leaders in the space and gain knowledge about why OER trended, what the concerns are regarding current research (including equity and the close ties there are to OER), and our proposed next steps plus recommendations to propel this fantastic resource further into practical implementation at institutions and learning environments.

Learning Outcomes: 5 Learning Outcomes of OER & the Digital Learning Innovation Trends Report:

1) Introduction to the Digital Learning Innovations Trends report
2) Understand how OER was identified as a primary trend
3) Learn about surprising OER findings in relation to the report
4) Understand continued empirical research being done on OER
5) Identify proposed next steps and recommendations for OER implementation and use

Speakers
avatar for Tanya Joosten

Tanya Joosten

Senior Scientist and Director, Digital Learning R&D, DETA Research Center, Univer
tanyajoosten.com
avatar for Kate Lee-McCarthy

Kate Lee-McCarthy

Director of Grants Management, Online Learning Consortium


Tuesday November 10, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  The Field, Lightning Talk
 
Wednesday, November 11
 

9:00am EST

Join Discord
Click the "Video Stream" button above from your logged in account to join our Discord space! Discord is a private server where conference participants can engage in text and video conversations. It's organized into a series of channels with different themes, and you can share pictures, links, and reactions. If you've ever used Slack, it might feel familiar. But there are several features of Discord that make it a great place to gather.

We encourage you to give it a try!


Wednesday November 11, 2020 9:00am - 9:30am EST
Discord
  Community Connections, Activity

9:00am EST

Welcome Desk
Welcome to the 2020 Open Education Conference! We're so pleased that you're joining us, and we hope you have a wonderful virtual experience.

The Welcome Desk will be open during breaks to anyone who would like to stop in with questions, comments, or just to say hello. There will be open breakout rooms that you can enter to connect with other attendees. ​Welcome Desk Zoom​​​

If you're here looking for help, here's a few additional resources you might find helpful:
You can also reach us in the following ways:

Wednesday November 11, 2020 9:00am - 6:00pm EST
Virtual Lobby
  Community Connections, Help
  • Session Type Help
  • Session Delivery Live
  • Captioning n/a

9:30am EST

Early Show
Each day will start with an informal conversation with the organizers and members of the conference community. The Early Show will provide a look at the day ahead, highlights so far, and opportunities to get to know different members of the community. Tune into the Zoom meeting to participate!

Planners
avatar for Akanksha Bhatnagar

Akanksha Bhatnagar

Communications & Public Relations Officer, Canadian Alliance of Student Associations
Akanksha is the Communications and Public Relaltions Officer with a national student lobby organization. Akanksha was also the 2019/20 President of the University of Alberta Students' Union and the 2018-19 Vice President Academic where she Chaired of the University of Alberta Open... Read More →
avatar for Ethan Senack

Ethan Senack

Chief of Staff, ISKME
avatar for Winni Zhang

Winni Zhang

Open Education Ambassador, SPARC


Wednesday November 11, 2020 9:30am - 9:55am EST
All Together

10:00am EST

Lockdown Online Training Programme in Africa
This session will be delivered with the learnings from the Lockdown Online Training Programme organized by Ghana Tech Lab in Ghana, West Africa.

The Lockdown Online Training Programme was organized by Ghana Tech Lab as a free programme for all youth across Ghana in April 2020 to May 2020.

The Programme was designed to provide free online training to high school, secondary school, and university students with another component for young entrepreneurs during the Covid19 Lockdown in Ghana. This was expected to ensure all youth irrespective of their location still had access to education which will provide them with skills that can build their employability as well as prepare them to take new springing careers that Covid19 has forced on the world.

The presentation will be in 3 parts:
- 1st part will present an overview of the programme, demographics of the applicants, and a brief summary of the programme and its impact.

- 2nd part will present an overview of how the programme was designed, the factors considered, and the delivery design in order to make it a success.

- 3rd part will present the challenges faced in running the programme, the solutions that worked, those that did not work and the way forward for running an Online Open Programme in developing countries.

The session's focus is on present how the programme was designed as a quick response to providing skills-based educational support to the Ghanaian youth while schools were on break.

Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Explain why development organizations (donors, governments, etc) should invest in promoting Open online training programmes
- Plan, and execute an online skills development programme
- Understand the challenges of online skills development programmes in developing countries

Speakers
avatar for Mohammed Zakaria

Mohammed Zakaria

Researcher, Ghana Tech Lab


Wednesday November 11, 2020 10:00am - 10:25am EST
Concurrent 4
  COVID-19, Presentation

10:00am EST

Embedding Mental Health and Wellbeing in Open Pedagogies
Growing numbers of students at schools, colleges and universities are experiencing mental health issues. The COVID-19 pandemic has further heightened anxiety and stress for many learners of all ages, especially those learners facing a significant change to the way in their education is delivered. While the act of learning can be extremely positive for student mental wellbeing, in other cases it can exacerbate or cause mental health difficulties. Any pedagogy of care (Bali, 2020) will need to address the relationship between curriculum and mental health. Fortunately, educators can do much to embed mental wellbeing in their teaching in order to prevent or mitigate mental health issues, including through the adoption of an open pedagogy strategy.

Various aspects of open pedagogy have the potential to support student mental health and wellbeing. For example, connecting learners with the wider world can support their sense of belonging, while renewable assessment offers relevance, authenticity and value that can support student motivation. Empowering students in co-creating curricula and resources offers similar potential benefits in respect of autonomy, motivation and wellbeing. However, open pedagogy also raises potential barriers to student wellbeing. For example, students with social anxiety may find the emphasis on collaboration uncomfortable and students with low self-esteem and/or self-efficacy may find it difficult to manage the degree of autonomy often involved in open pedagogy approaches. In addition, connecting students with the wider world online brings safety and surveillance issues that could compromise their wellbeing, leading to stress and anxiety.

Most of these barriers can be managed, however, by paying careful attention to learners’ specific needs. This presentation draws on current research from The Open University and elsewhere to underpin an exploration of the relationship between open pedagogy and mental wellbeing, and the strategies that educators might employ to evaluate and manage the potential impact of any open pedagogy approach. The presentation discusses how Universal Design for Learning (UDL) can be used as a guiding framework within which to locate open pedagogy strategies in order to evaluate their impact on student mental health and to ensure that open pedagogy-informed teaching, learning and assessment supports, rather than undermines wellbeing for diverse learners in diverse contexts.


Learning Outcomes:
•Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the relationship between mental health and learning in diverse global contexts.
•Identify some of the ways in which open pedagogies can support mental health and wellbeing.
•Identify some of the barriers to mental health and wellbeing connected with open pedagogies and the ways in which they might be managed.

Speakers
avatar for Leigh-Anne Perryman

Leigh-Anne Perryman

Senior Lecturer, The Open University
I'm passionate about open education, about social justice, about redressing the imbalance between the world's most and least privileged people, about teaching and learning, about openness and about women's empowerment.
avatar for Kate Lister

Kate Lister

Lecturer, The Open University


Wednesday November 11, 2020 10:00am - 10:25am EST
Concurrent 5
  Social Justice, Presentation

10:00am EST

Open Education in European Libraries of Higher Education: What We Know So Far
European academic libraries have taken a leadership role in advancing Open Scholarship and Open Science in the last two decades. Recent policy development around Open Science has prompted a surge in implementation activities. Open Education Policy has also been in the making for over a decade, with the UNESCO OER Recommendation ratified in late 2019. It's here that the next wave of university challenges lie as some universities are aiming for a more open, visible and accessible university by embracing open in not only research, but also in education through Open Education (OE).
Scores of Higher Education libraries in the US have taken on the OER challenge building great momentum for over 5 years with over 130 organisations reporting OER activities in the 2019 SPARC OER Report. We believe that European libraries will follow suit and engage more in this area in the coming decade with a similar commitment shown to Open Science in time. However, before we determine what the next strategic steps for libraries are, it is vital that we gain a better understanding of current OE policy and practice in Europe.
In late 2019 SPARC Europe, in consultation with the European Open Education Librarian Network, carried out research into how libraries in Higher Education are supporting OE. The survey was the first of its kind and saw responses from over 20 European countries. This paper will share the survey’s key results. It reveals to what extent respondents have OE policies, and how far libraries have been involved in their conception. The paper then highlights what kinds of OE / OER services libraries currently provide and how far they take the lead or support in these. To support that work, we inform on whether libraries perceive that they have the skills they need to support OE sufficiently and compare this with the current service offering. The paper also shares some of the libraries’ main challenges and opportunities in supporting OE in in the areas of culture and the environment, resources, quality, access and reuse and policy. Finally, we propose recommendations for concrete action whilst making the case for why libraries in Higher Education are important partners in delivering on the UNESCO OER Recommendation.

Learning Outcomes:
providing
- an overview of how libraries in Higher Education are delivering on OE/OER in Europe and reporting on their challenges and benefits based on a recent European survey,
- concrete recommendations and calls to action for libraries to take leadership and engage in OE on OE policy development, OE literacy, cultural change, co-creation or OER discovery.
Whilst raising awareness of the value that libraries bring to OE, showing how they can contribute to the UNESCO OER Recommendation.

Speakers
avatar for Vanessa Proudman

Vanessa Proudman

Director, SPARC Europe
Vanessa Proudman is Director of SPARC Europe; she is working to make Open the default in Europe. Vanessa has 20 years’ international experience working with many leading university libraries worldwide, with research institutions, international policy makers, together with information... Read More →


Wednesday November 11, 2020 10:00am - 10:25am EST
Concurrent 3
  Strategies, Presentation

10:00am EST

Collaboration Across Contexts: Reframing OpenEd for a Post-Pandemic World
In this session, we will offer a reframing and decolonizing of “OpenEd" to include diverse, global perspectives. Too often we assume that adopting an open practice is all about cost savings for students. While making education affordable is critically important, we argue that offering students an expanded world-view and setting them up to succeed as consumers (of information and goods) in the global economy is of equal importance. As practitioners, we can lead by example through intentionally fostering opportunities for global engagement and by welcoming diverse perspectives into our unique fields and disciplines.

We believe #OpenEd20 should be about helping to situate learners in a broader, global context; one honest about the complexity within which we all find ourselves (climate change, culture wars, pandemics, etc.) but one receptive to the promise of new opportunities. Join a panel of educators and practitioners as we explore what it means to reframe OpenEd in 2020 and beyond. We will explore a collection of perspectives and projects including:

https://hubs.mozilla.com
https://internetofeducation.org
https://www.unv.org
https://en.unesco.org/artificial-intelligence
https://www.salzburgglobal.org
https://karanga.org
https://oe4bw.ijs.si
https://oerpolicy.eu/oe-policy-forum

Learning Outcomes:
- Discuss the value of offering learners a diverse, global perspective and why it should be considered a critical pillar of OpenEd.
- Offer strategies for decolonizing the educational canon.
- Demonstrate that Open Education is about more than cost savings.
- Provide strategies for acknowledging students’ diverse backgrounds by discussing issues across cultures and borders.
Discuss how government and social entities are driving open educational initiatives.

Speakers
avatar for Dominic Regester

Dominic Regester

Program Director, Salzburg Global Seminar
avatar for Taylor Kendal

Taylor Kendal

Chief Program Officer, Learning Economy
avatar for Spencer Ellis

Spencer Ellis

Director of Educational Innovation, Colorado Department of Higher Education
avatar for Sherry Jones

Sherry Jones

Philosophy and Game Studies Subject Matter Expert and Instructor, Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design
avatar for Jo Hironaka

Jo Hironaka

Program Specialist, Digital Innovation and Transformation, UNESCO


Wednesday November 11, 2020 10:00am - 10:55am EST
Concurrent 1
  Collaborations, Interactive Discussion

10:00am EST

How (and Why) to Create Your Own OER Podcast
Welcome! This will be a pre-recorded presentation but will be "screened" live in Zoom. We'll be available for discussion in Zoom starting at 10:40AM EST! See you soon!

Session Description

At MIT OpenCourseWare, we’re passionate about sharing OER with a global audience. Our newest initiative, the Chalk Radio Podcast, is our latest creative effort to promote awareness of OER at scale and to amplify diverse experiences of creating and sharing OER. We completed our first season with 100K+ downloads on podcast platforms and 110K+ listens on YouTube, so we strongly believe podcasting can be a powerful tool for sharing OER more broadly.

In this session, facilitated by the host of Chalk Radio and MIT OpenCourseWare’s Media Production lead, we share what we’ve learned as newcomers to the podcasting space, provide guidance to other educators initiating or currently working on their own OER-focused podcasts, and get feedback and tips from more experienced participants.

Our session hones in on the five stages of getting a podcast off the ground: 1) defining your focus and audience; 2) making technical decisions about how to record (and how to reimagine these possibilities when recording remotely during Covid-19); 3) preparing interview protocols; 4) post-production editing and accessibility considerations; and 5) outreach and promotion. Through an asynchronous special epsiode of Chalk Radio made especially for our session attendees, we’ll briefly share practical tips in each of these areas and then make ourselves available via zoom to work with participants to apply the suggestions to their own projects. We will use participants’ ideas and experiences to enhance the production and promotion of Chalk Radio, and invite participants to share their own stories of making, using, and sharing OER on our podcast.

Learning Outcomes:
1) Define your OER podcast audience and focus; 2) Get recommendations for recording remotely during Covid-19; 3) Discuss how to develop effective interview protocols; 4) Learn about post-production storytelling strategies; 5) Discuss how to make your podcast more accessible to a diverse audience; 6) Get feedback on outreach strategies and gain access to promotional email templates; 7) Amplify your OER story on Chalk Radio, the MIT OpenCourseWare podcast



Speakers
avatar for Brett Paci

Brett Paci

Video Publication Manager, MIT Open Learning
Please ask me about video, podcasts, and the droid attack on the Wookies.
avatar for Sarah Hansen

Sarah Hansen

Senior Manager, Open Educator & Strategic Initiatives, MIT Open Learning
Please ask me about podcasting and MIT OpenCourseWare.


Wednesday November 11, 2020 10:00am - 10:55am EST
Concurrent 2
  Practices, Workshop

10:30am EST

Collaborating Toward an Open Future in Education
Open education policymaking is a key area covered by the 2019 UNESCO Recommendation on OER, which invites member states to "develop or encourage policy environments, including those at the institutional and national levels, that are supportive of effective OER practices".

The OE Policy Hub (a new project of the OER World Map) is being developed to support activities being undertaken around the world to implement the Recommendation, especially those related to policymaking, cross border cooperation and monitoring. Following the approach of the OER World Map, the Hub aims at aggregating and connecting available information for the benefit of educational policymakers, policy advisors and researchers. The core element of the Hub is the OER Policy Registry, a collection of policy documents which was started by Creative Commons in 2015. One of the challenges of the project is to extend the data collection process to the activities leading up to, and triggered by, the publication of initial policy documents. Another challenge is to identify mechanisms to evaluate policy impacts, to support benchlearning.

The Policy Registry currently includes around 200 policy documents from all educational sectors and levels classified by a comprehensive metadata schema. The Hub aims to go one step further by providing a curated collection of tools and resources as well as a database of experts within the field of OE policy.

The Policy Hub is now collaborating with the Community College Consortium for OER (CCCOER), a growing consortium of U.S. Community and Technical Colleges committed to equity and student success through the adoption of open educational practices, policy, and resources. CCCOER is a regional node of OE Global. Through its Regional Leadership for Open Education (RLOE) initiative, CCCOER aims to collaborate across institutional and state boundaries to find solutions for issues impacting OER adoption in statewide programs and in large multi-institution systems. The collaboration with the Policy Hub aims to explore the feasibility of documenting and storing state-level policies and guidelines within the Policy Hub platform. Through partnering with U.S. practitioners, the Policy Hub team will develop the functionality, usability and relevance of the platform for the global OE community. This presentation will outline the core elements of the project, summarize key lessons learned so far, and sketch planned next steps.

Learning Outcomes:
Participants will learn about the OE Policy Hub as a new service for policymakers, advocates and researchers and how it contributes to the implementation of the UNESCO Recommendation. They will have grasped the different functionalities of the platform and how to use it. Also they will have an awareness of the challenges and opportunities involved and be able to participate in further discussions about the Hub's future development.

Speakers
avatar for Jan Neumann

Jan Neumann

Projectmanager OER World Map, North Rhine-Westphalian Library Service Centre (hbz)
avatar for Denise Coté

Denise Coté

Librarian, College of DuPage
CCCOER Regional Leaders in Open Education: Policy & Strategy Lead
avatar for Javiera Atenas

Javiera Atenas

OE Policy Hub (OER World Map), Researcher
Information Scientist with a PhD in Education and senior teaching fellow of the Higher Education Academy UK. She is the principal researcher in data and education at ILDA and co-coordinates the Open Education Working Group.@jatenas
avatar for Fabio Nascimbeni

Fabio Nascimbeni

Researcher, OE Policy Hub (OER World Map)
avatar for Leo Havemann

Leo Havemann

Digital Education Advisor / Postgraduate Researcher / Researcher, University College London / Open University / OE Policy Hub


Wednesday November 11, 2020 10:30am - 10:55am EST
Concurrent 3
  Collaborations, Presentation

11:00am EST

Overcoming Barriers to Sustainable Open Education Initiatives: Labor and Ethical Considerations
Encouraging and supporting the adoption and creation of open educational resources demands significant academic labor; however, few studies provide explicit detail about the personnel and costs underlying open education initiatives. This presents a problem for institutions seeking to implement or improve their own initiatives. The lack of transparency about labor also obscures ethical concerns about the agency of the librarians, faculty, students, instructional designers, and other potential stakeholders involved, each of whom occupy varying positions of power and privilege within the academic apparatus. This presentation helps to address that gap through a case study of how Ohio University Libraries have attempted to make its open education initiatives more sustainable and impactful by transitioning from workshops and other labor-intensive activities to collaborations with faculty and students focused on OER creation in which librarians have taken on more of a project management role. We will describe those initiatives and the projects they have yielded, including a student-authored open Hispanic linguistics textbook, student-created test banks to support OER materials for a high-enrollment art history course, and several additional projects in which students have been hired to assist faculty with developing open content. We will discuss the challenges encountered along the way and how our trajectory has helped us to overcome some of those barriers. We will frame our discussion within the context of labor and the ethical implications for open educational practices and open pedagogy.

Learning Outcomes:
Participants will understand possibilities for creating open education initiatives that are more sustainable and focus more on OER creation and open pedagogy via collaboration between librarians, faculty, and students.
Participants will be able to critically analyze the labor implications for their own open education initiatives in order to foster more equitable and inclusive collaborations in support of open education.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Guder

Chris Guder

Subject Librarian for Education, Ohio University
avatar for Bryan McGeary

Bryan McGeary

Learning Design and Open Education Engagement Librarian, Pennsylvania State University


Wednesday November 11, 2020 11:00am - 11:25am EST
Concurrent 1
  Challenges, Presentation

11:00am EST

Fostering Rapid Institution-wide Curricular Change in Response to COVID-19
In the spring of 2020, institutions around the world grappled with COVID-19 and looked to the fall with uncertainty. Responding to this unknown, reports that higher education enrollments may be significantly lower, and the recognition that already at-risk students would likely be further harmed financially, one institution in the Appalachian region of the United States decided on a campus-wide initiative. To model a proactive social justice approach to the inequities experienced by students financially unable to purchase learning materials, the University of Pikeville launched a campaign to convert all undergraduate and graduate-level courses from traditional publisher-provided content to free alternatives. Faculty could select Open Educational Resources, materials available from library collections, or those in the public domain. In addition, a relatively small fund was created to purchase resources where no free alternative existed.

This session will discuss this rapid curricular change initiative from its conception to implementation. Insight will be provided from a key upper-level administrator as well as professional development personnel tasked with assisting faculty in locating, assessing, and ultimately selecting free alternatives to their previous textbooks.

We hope you leave this session with lessons we have learned and ideas on how you may be able to initiate change on your campus, as well!

Learning Outcomes:
1. Review the approach taken by one institution to convert all Fall 2020 courses to free text alternative in under 5 months.
2. Describe the suggestions by a key administrator in facilitating rapid curricular change.
3. List the lessons learned by those tasked with fostering rapid conversion of courses from tradition text to free alternatives, such as OER.

Google Drive link to presentation and materials: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1_4KcRWr6lo6Ge_0LJQ0MSZg0jToz46of?usp=sharing

Speakers
avatar for Eric Werth

Eric Werth

Professional Development Manager, University of Pikeville
I am the Professional Development Manager at the University of Pikeville, where I work on campus-wide initiatives aimed and improving student learning in face-to-face, blended, and online courses and research into open education. Specifically, my research has focused on motivation... Read More →
avatar for Lori Werth

Lori Werth

Provost, University of Pikeville
Dr. Lori Werth is the the Provost and Chief Academic Officer at the University of Pikeville and has served as a higher education administrator and faculty member over the past 23 years. In her current position, Dr. Werth leads Academic Affairs, Athletics, Admissions, Registrar, Institutional... Read More →
avatar for Katherine Williams

Katherine Williams

Professional Development Educator, University of Pikeville
I am the Professional Development Educator at the University of Pikeville in Pikeville, KY. My current research at the institution focuses on Open Pedagogy and OER-enabled Pedagogy as means to promote equity in learning, particularly when looked through the lens of Critical Pedagogy... Read More →


Wednesday November 11, 2020 11:00am - 11:25am EST
Concurrent 2
  COVID-19, Presentation

11:00am EST

Law, Access, and the Open Casebook
Law schools are facing an access crisis. For students returning to class, and faculty holding courses, the COVID-19 pandemic has made educational resources harder to access and create.

Law students use textbooks that are groups of cases and commentary by authors, known as casebooks. Traditional casebooks can cost hundreds of dollars, and can’t be customized to meet the changing needs of courses today. We have the opportunity to redefine the casebook using open educational resources.

This session will share how instructors are using the H2O platform from Harvard Law School Library to create and adapt open educational resources in law. In this session we will frame access issues facing law students and faculty today, and demonstrate how law schools can use H2O to support their courses.

Learning Outcomes:
This session will share how law schools are using the H2O platform from Harvard Law School Library to create and adapt open educational resources that meet the changing needs of students and faculty.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Fitzpatrick

Kelly Fitzpatrick

Research Associate, Harvard Law School Library


Wednesday November 11, 2020 11:00am - 11:25am EST
Concurrent 4
  COVID-19, Presentation

11:00am EST

"Science Isn't Really My Thing": Nonmajor Students’ Perceptions of an Open Pedagogy Project
Our session is pre-recorded so we won't be with you live - feel free to ask questions using this Google doc or by tweeting us: @hsmiceli and @lindseygumb

Presentation Slides: Science Isn't Really My Thing

In this session, we have invited two former students, who previously participated in the open pedagogy project we employ in a general education science course, to share their and their classmates' perceptions and experiences participating in the project. Non-majors students have very complex emotions and experiences that shape their relationship with science. Many students enter with high anxiety and low confidence in their scientific abilities, usually manifesting in comments like “Just so you know, I’m not good at science.” We’ve noticed that open pedagogy has allowed these students a participatory voice in scientific dialogues that they are often excluded from as non-majors.

The students have previously participated in groups to create, edit, and curate websites that were then used as the “textbook” for future semesters. Students have often responded positively to this project, citing that knowing their work will help future students in this required course gives them more confidence in science, as well as gives them a more solid purpose for completing the project. Because this project is about giving students a voice in spaces they usually don’t have one, these students are excited to engage with the Open Education community to amplify their experiences. After a brief introduction to the project, students will be asked about their feelings upon entering the course, their experiences creating and editing the websites, and their feelings exiting the course, among other questions. The student presenters will also share and respond to quotes from their fellow classmates. Questions from the audience will be welcomed as well.


Learning Outcomes:
Students that enter required, general education science courses can have high anxiety and low confidence, open pedagogy can be a tool used to increase confidence, decrease anxiety, and give students a voice in science. Attendees will hear from students themselves regarding the impact of participating in open pedagogy in their required general education science course.

Speakers
avatar for Lindsey Gumb

Lindsey Gumb

Scholarly Communications Librarian, Roger Williams University
avatar for Heather Miceli

Heather Miceli

Adjunct Faculty, Roger Williams University
Interests: Open pedagogy in science courses, Adjunct support systems
avatar for Morgan Strassburg

Morgan Strassburg

Student, Roger Williams University
avatar for Ainsley Iovanna

Ainsley Iovanna

Student, Roger Williams University


Wednesday November 11, 2020 11:00am - 11:25am EST
Concurrent 3
  Practices, Presentation

11:00am EST

OER Courses: From 0 to 46 in One Year!
This session is about the process used at Trine University, a small, private, not for profit university, to offer courses using Open Educational Resources (OER). Trine has gone from zero OER courses to 46 in one year, a phenomenal rate of implementation that is saving their students significant money where course materials are concerned.
The presenters will discuss the importance of getting buy-in from key stakeholders such as faculty who will be asked to develop and use OERs for their classes and university administrators who will be involved in approving funding for such course development. In addition to the importance of constituent buy-in, the presenters will provide information on the process of selecting the right course designers and deciding on which courses to begin with as OER development is rolled out. They will further elaborate upon OER course development and the possibility for Z-programs (i.e., degree programs where all of the content-specific courses within the major utilize OER materials). These Z-degrees are attractive to prospective students in that all of the course materials are free of charge to them, which has positive marketing implications for the university.
Lastly, the presenters will discuss how student and faculty feedback is used to improve the use of OER materials in an effort to close the assessment loop for these courses. The presentation will conclude with a question and answer session to enable participants an opportunity to reflect upon the content of the talk as well as to interact with the presenters to gain clarification on any points of interest to them.


Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this session participants will be able to do the following within their institutional context:
1. Develop a rationale for the use of OERs
2. Identify key stakeholders and form an OER committee
3. Advocate for financial incentives for developing OER courses
4. Access fundamental OER websites such as OpenStax, OER Commons, Merlot, and so on as a starting point for developing OER materials
5. Promote mapping of activities to learning outcomes
6. Track OER effectiveness.

Speakers
avatar for John Shannon

John Shannon

VPAA, Trine University
avatar for Keirsten Eberts

Keirsten Eberts

Assistant Vice President and Dean of Academics for CGPS/TrineOnline, Trine University


Wednesday November 11, 2020 11:00am - 11:25am EST
Concurrent 5
  Strategies, Presentation

11:30am EST

Tea Time
"Tea time" is a break in scheduled programming when attendees can rest, practice self-care, or dive into networking or asynchronous sessions.

This tea time we'll have an open Zoom room you can join to chat with other attendees about what sessions you're attending or anything else you'd like! Just click the Video Stream link to join.

If you'd like something quick to watch, here is a set of themed lightning talks to consider. Feel free to take the conversation to Discord and share your thoughts with others.

Student Focused:
Integration of Student Perception Data with Multi-mode Learning Analytics for Continuous Improvement of Course Materials
Sustainable Textbooks through Curation of Student Work

Wednesday November 11, 2020 11:30am - 11:55am EST
All Together
  Community Connections, Break

12:00pm EST

Promoting Robust Student Learning of Statistics with Open Education Resources
Learning is robust if the acquired knowledge meets at least one of the following three criteria: long-term retention; transfer and accelerated future learning. Promoting robust learning (rather than normal learning) of statistics knowledge content types is a desired transformative outcome for a second year statistics course offered at Bethune-Cookman University. Thus, we selected and implemented instances of statistics courses available through the Open Learning Initiative (OLI) web-based learning environment. Analytics of learning transactions from over nine semesters (offered to 303 traditional and 94 online students) is allowing us to investigate the metacognitive behaviors that promote robust student learning of statistics.

Learning Outcomes:
The attendee will learn how the data received from Open Learning Initiative by Carnegie Mellon helped us to determine best interventions to improve learning of statistics in Practical Statistics Course offered at Bethune-Cookman University.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Carey

Kelly Carey

Mathematics Instructor & Department Assessment Coordinator, Bethune-Cookman University
I have been a mathematics educator since 1988. I love trying to incorporate new technology in my courses. Recent interests are studying student metacognition Strategies in Learning Statistics.
avatar for Raphael Isokpehi

Raphael Isokpehi

Professor of Biology & Bioinformatics, Bethune-Cookman University


Wednesday November 11, 2020 12:00pm - 12:25pm EST
Concurrent 4
  Practices, Presentation

12:00pm EST

The Power of Student Voice in the Open Education Movement
Students are the end consumers for Open Educational Resources (OER). In order to have a discussion about diversity, pedagogy, quality of materials, and many other common conference topics, advocates must first understand what students needs are. In this panel led by former Student Body President Winni Zhang, former Student Union President Hailey Babb, the panelists will share their stories of policies that worked on their respective campuses as well as policies that can be modeled at other institutions. The presentation will discuss what a student-centric approach truly looks like, and how the OER community can continue to empower student voice in all parts of the open education movement. Understanding that each campus/organization is different, the panel will provide the audience with ample Q&A time to address the concerns the audience may have regarding their specific campuses or in general.

Learning Outcomes:
Attendees will walk away with:
1. An understanding of the importance of students in the fight for OERs.
2. A plan to mobilize and empower student voices on their respective campuses.
3. Case studies of how student advocacy at two seperate institutions advanced open education on the respective campuses.
4. An opportunity to ask former student leaders specific challenges to mobilizing students on their own campuses.
5. A new framework for viewing open education that is student-centric.

Speakers
avatar for Hailey Babb

Hailey Babb

Open Education Coordinator, SPARC
avatar for Winni Zhang

Winni Zhang

Open Education Ambassador, SPARC


Wednesday November 11, 2020 12:00pm - 12:55pm EST
Concurrent 2
  Open Education 101, Panel

12:00pm EST

Open Art Histories: Reimagining How We Teach Visual and Material Cultures
Open Art Histories (OAH) is a platform for art, art history, visual art, architecture, communication, and museum studies teachers and instructors in Canada. Our goal is to build a generative and supportive network for addressing the pressing pedagogical challenges confronting these fields, including globalizing art history, teaching English-as-an-additional-language students, decolonizing the discipline and classroom, and advancing accessibility and inclusion. This collaborative workshop explores how we might adapt our pedagogical practices to best represent a field in flux, one that is no longer bound by a single historical narrative or set of objects? What approaches or tools might we develop or adopt to make our increasingly dynamic field accessible to the increasingly diverse students in our classrooms? How can open access, online resources, and new technologies, which have dramatically transformed the way both text and object are encountered, shape course content and delivery, while providing dynamic, tangible, and sustainable outcomes for students? Participants will consider the challenges in teaching visual and material culture both within the discipline of art history and beyond as a way to order and reimagine, reinvigorate, reinvent, and reshape the teaching of the discipline for our times.


Learning Outcomes:
At the end of this session, participants will be able to: identify the challenges in teaching visual and material cultures in the 21st century; make connections between the challenges and pedagogical tools (resources, programs, apps) currently available;
and, envision ethical and sustainable open educational practices in their own teaching and curriculum.

Speakers
avatar for Alena Buis

Alena Buis

Department Chair, Snəw̓eyəɬ leləm̓ Langara College
Alena Buis is an Instructor and Chair of the Department of Art History and Religious Studies at snəw̓eyəɬ leləm̓-Langara College in Vancouver British Columbia. She has an MA in Canadian Art History from Concordia University (Montreal) and a PhD in Visual and Material Culture from Queen’s University (Kingston). Her recent research focuses on the scholarship of teaching and learning for art history (So-TLAH... Read More →
avatar for Johanna Amos

Johanna Amos

Part-time faculty, Art History, Concordia University
avatar for Sarah E.K. Smith

Sarah E.K. Smith

Assistant Professor, Carleton University
avatar for Jen Kennedy

Jen Kennedy

Assistant Professor, Queen's University
avatar for Liz

Liz

SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow, Queen’s University, Department of Art History and Art Conservation
avatar for Devon Smither

Devon Smither

Assistant Professor, Art History/Museum Studies, University of Lethbridge


Wednesday November 11, 2020 12:00pm - 12:55pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Practices, Workshop

12:00pm EST

Breaking Barriers: Regional Compacts Collaboration for OER Policy and Practice
This "Re-imagining" session encourages input and guided conversation among the regional compacts and together with the OER community. The compact panelists will share their regional and national work and ask for feedback and input from the session participants. Questions will include:
1. How can the regional compacts support the OER community during COVID-19?
2. How might the regional compacts help reduce structural inequities including systemic racism, and barriers to the access and full participation in the Open exchange of knowledge?
3. How can we all work together at the system, state, and multi-state compact levels to more efficiently scale OER?
During COVID-19, state, system, and institutional leaders are searching for ways to make college more equitable, accessible, and affordable for students. The WICHE Cooperative for Educational Technologies (WCET) is working in concert with the four regional higher education compacts (MHEC, NEBHE, SREB & WICHE) to facilitate evidence-based frameworks and guidelines which promote policy and practice support to increase access, affordability and equity via the use of OER. The session focuses on the regional compacts' role in exploring large-scale policy and best practices in the higher education landscape in a collaborative manner.





Learning Outcomes:
1. Participants will learn about OER collaboration among the four regional compacts.
2. Participants will learn how systems, states, and multi-state regions have worked together to promote OER state policy and practice.
3. Panelists/Presenters will listen and learn how to best support OER efforts in their regions and across the US.
4. Participants and Presenters will learn more about each other and how they can encourage and support each other's efforts.

Speakers
avatar for Tanya Spilovoy

Tanya Spilovoy

Director, Open Policy, WCET (WICHE Cooperative for Educational Technologies)
avatar for Jenny Parks

Jenny Parks

Vice President, Midwestern Higher Education Compact
avatar for Wanda Barker

Wanda Barker

Director, Education Technology and Multistate Cooperative, Southern Regional Education Board
avatar for Rachael Stachowiak

Rachael Stachowiak

Associate Director, New England State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement, New England Board of Higher Education
avatar for Liliana Diaz Solodukhin

Liliana Diaz Solodukhin

Policy Analyst, Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE)


Wednesday November 11, 2020 12:00pm - 12:55pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Strategies, Panel

12:30pm EST

E-Learning Innovation with OER: COVID Response at River Parishes Community College
This session will focus on the course redesign process that academic and technical faculty at River Parishes Community College followed in response to the Covid-19 pandemic in order to transform 8 CTE courses into an online format utilizing open content.

Learning Outcomes:
1) Locate credible sources for OER that can be used in CTE courses

2) Apply the course redesign process to CTE

3) Discuss the challenges faced and lessons learned when incorporating OER into CTE courses

Speakers
avatar for Esperanza Zenon

Esperanza Zenon

Associate Professor, River Parishes Community College
avatar for Jared Eusea

Jared Eusea

Assistant Professor of Nathematics, River Parishes Community College


Wednesday November 11, 2020 12:30pm - 12:55pm EST
Concurrent 4
  COVID-19, Presentation

12:30pm EST

Opening Ways: Collaborating Through Common Challenges to Open Education
The "Open" in Open Education is not only about free and reusable course materials. It is also about open communication and collaboration among faculty, staff, students and administrators regarding course material selection and cost. In this presentation, we will present our experience with an OER program at a mid-sized regional university in the Southeast as a means to facilitate discussion and sharing ways we can open education for all.

Over two years ago, East Tennessee State University’s Student Library Advisory Council decided that they wanted to use their student library fee to fund initiatives supporting Open Educational Resources. Since that time, a Digital Scholarship Librarian from Charles C. Sherrod Library and a Teaching and Learning Specialist from the Center for Teaching Excellence combined their expertise to launch and complete a two-year pilot program. Now, the question remains “how do we reimagine a two-year pilot program into an establish suite of services?”

In this session, the presenters will briefly discuss their two-year pilot program, specifically hosting Open Education Network (previously Open Textbook Network) workshops and launching an OER Awards Program. Then, they will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the pilot program based on anecdotal observations and feedback from surveys conducted throughout the program. The program will be contextualized with a description of other campus and state discussions and initiatives. The presenters will show how important it is to seize opportunities to collaborate with student groups, departments, faculty, and administrators in order to sustain open initiatives on campus. This will lead to how they intend to expand and further evolve the program.

The session will delve into questions that arise when starting or reimagining Open Education services: Should the focus be on open or affordable? Who "owns” Open Education on a campus? How do we effectively educate, communicate, and collaborate in regards to Open Education?

Learning Outcomes:
Attendees will…
- Learn about the strengths and weaknesses of a two-year Open Educational Resources pilot program.

- Identify the groups on their campus to collaborate with in order to strengthen their Open Education initiatives.

- Consider ways to evaluate and reimagine Open Education initiatives on their campus.

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Sergiadis

Ashley Sergiadis

Digital Scholarship Librarian/Asst. Prof., East Tennessee State University
avatar for Philip Smith

Philip Smith

Teaching and Learning Specialist, East Tennessee State University


Wednesday November 11, 2020 12:30pm - 12:55pm EST
Concurrent 5
  Strategies, Presentation

1:00pm EST

Bridging the Impact of COVID-19 on Open Education: Case Study of Medical Education

CoVID-19 has closed the doors of more than 2000 medical schools worldwide, yet has opened the door for a new era of education, where e-learning and open education have become vital to ensure the accessibility of a quality education to students anywhere and anytime. This session is an interactive discussion with the aim to introduce participants to the perspective of medical students worldwide on e-learning and open education practices during COVID-19, as collected and analyzed through an IFMSA survey reflecting the experiences of 411 medical students from 68 countries worldwide about the impact of CoVID-19 on medical education, more specifically in terms of the adaptability of the educational tools, accessibility, and their quality. Consequently, this session will lead participants to reflect on how to implement and optimize student-centeredness in open education and e-learning, through discussing the recommendations stated in the report of the aforementioned survey. Hence,it will comprise of a variety of facilitation methods, ranging from presentations where participants will be provided with information related to a summary of the IFMSA report on the impact of CoVID-19 on Medical Education from the perspective of medical students worldwide, a discussion using the interactive online platforms to collect participants input or perspectives on particular questions and compare it with the results from the aforementioned report, to small groups discussions where participants will brainstorm practical recommendations to incorporate the students’ perspective in open education strategies during the pandemic.


Learning Outcomes:

- Participants are able to share the challenges, and good practices related to open education during CoVID-19 from their local contexts
- Participants have an overview of the perspective of medical students globally on the impact of COVID-19 on their education.
- Participants are able to discuss the student-centeredness in open education during the pandemic
- Participants are able to elaborate recommendations to improve open education during CoVID-19.

Speakers
avatar for Abdullah Rajeeb Al-Khafajy

Abdullah Rajeeb Al-Khafajy

Liaison Officer for Medical Education Issues, International Federation for Medical Students' Associations (IFMSA)
Mr. Abdullah Al-Khafajy (aka Abdullah Rajeeb) is a 6th-year medical student at Baghdad University College of Medicine, with five years of experience in the field of student advocacy and medical education on a national, regional, and international level. He currently serves as Liaison... Read More →
avatar for Marouane Amzil

Marouane Amzil

Alumnus, International Federation of Medical Students' Associations (IFMSA)
avatar for Alaa Dafallah

Alaa Dafallah

Alumna, International Federation of Medical Students' Associations (IFMSA)


Wednesday November 11, 2020 1:00pm - 1:25pm EST
Concurrent 3
  COVID-19, Presentation

1:00pm EST

Evolving Open Education Policy in Texas Higher Education
Higher education policy is shaped by the work of faculty and students, and policy also shapes that work. Current OER initiatives in Texas higher education both build on policies and programs in place at institutions and seek to further a culture of OER use in the state. This session will be a case study of state-level higher education policy in OER, reviewing both best practices and lessons learned in Texas. The current landscape of increased demand for digital materials and increased economic pressure for students due to the COVID-19 pandemic will be explored, which an eye to how that reshaped OER policy in Texas. Attendees will also be asked to share their experiences building and enacting OER policy in other states.

Agenda:
- Background on Texas OER initiatives in higher education, including legislation, data, and how policy was shaped into action.
- Best practices that were developed in the process of putting OER policy into action.
- Lessons learned and future plans for furthering a culture of OER use at Texas institutions.
- Discussion of how COVID-19 affected OER work in the state.
- An interactive discussion of OER work in other states, both similarities and differences.
- Q&A

Learning Outcomes:
- A case study of evolving OER policy at the state government level
- Tips for turning OER legislation into OER programs
- Best practices for engaging institutional input at the state level
- Lessons learned and considerations for continuous improvement

Speakers
avatar for Kylah Torre

Kylah Torre

Program Director, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board
avatar for Sheri Ranis

Sheri Ranis

Program Director, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board


Wednesday November 11, 2020 1:00pm - 1:25pm EST
Concurrent 2
  Strategies, Presentation

1:00pm EST

Use of Open Educational Resources in Health Sciences Programs Libraries
The article presents and analyzes how health libraries can cooperate in the production, access, and dissemination of open educational resources in their information competence programs, as well as in the training processes of health science students.

As a background, the research calls on Brazilian librarians, showing that they must engage in the open education movement and relate their informational practices to the initiatives and guidelines of the front.

A study from Prudencio, Bernardi, and Biolchini (2020) shows that academic production in Library Sciences, either from Brazil or written in Portuguese, relating library practices and open educational resources is incipient, perhaps scarce. Thus, the present research is justified.

This study, for the purposes and means of investigation, is characterized as exploratory, bibliographic, and field research. We collected the data in our empirical area, that is, public university libraries that offer Medicine and Biomedicine courses in Brazil. We conducted an empirical investigation to expand our understanding of the research object, the domain studied, and its population.

In a second step, we consulted the institutional repositories of the federal higher education institutions (HEIs) from Brazil to check if there was the category “open educational resource” (OER) as a source of information available in their catalogs.

It observes that only 12.5% (15) of the 120 HEIs have OER indications in their catalogs. It notes that, in libraries, OERs operate as sources of information, collection, stock, and repository of information and didactic resources. It points out that health information literacy practices should contribute to a culture of users more aware of issues of licensing, authorship, and cost related to these resources.

Finally, it understands that the librarian must incorporate and encourage the use of OERs in the instructions given to students in health degrees, and also in lifelong educational practices.

OERs are an attractive and sustainable tool, adequate to the financial scarcity of public university libraries in Brazil. This is especially important in Health Sciences, a field with collections that tend to be quite expensive.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Only 12.5% of Brazilian public universities with a Health Sciences program have OER indications in their catalogs.
2. There’s little scientific production assessing intersections between Librarianship, open education, and open educational resources, especially when applying to Health Sciences libraries.
3. Brazilian librarians are hardly engaged in the production, use, or sharing of OERs.
4. This theme is poorly addressed in Brazilian Librarianship programs.

Speakers
avatar for Dayanne da Silva Prudencio

Dayanne da Silva Prudencio

Professor, Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro
avatar for Andre Luis do Nascimento Ferreira

Andre Luis do Nascimento Ferreira

Student, Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro
avatar for Lyvia Rocha de Jesus Araujo

Lyvia Rocha de Jesus Araujo

Student, Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro


Wednesday November 11, 2020 1:00pm - 1:25pm EST
Concurrent 4
  Strategies, Presentation

1:00pm EST

How Does OER Efficacy Vary Based on Student Age and Course Modality? A Multi-institutional Analysis
Open educational resources (OER) are teaching and learning materials that are available without access fees. Previous findings have indicated that learning outcomes are similar between OER and commercial resources (which typically require fees to access), but there is considerable variation in the findings (Clinton & Khan, 2019; Hilton, 2019). It is not well known which students in what kinds of courses may have different outcomes with OER use. The purpose of this study is to examine how OER interacts with two characteristics that are becoming more commonplace in higher education: students older than typical age and online courses (Markle, 2015; Ortagus, 2017). Students older than typical age and in online courses were of particular interest as both these characteristics are associated with lower college retention rates (Chen et al., 2020; Cochran et al., 2014; Murphy & Stewart, 2017). It was anticipated that OER would be more beneficial for students older than typical age and those enrolled in online courses due to the lower costs and flexibility afforded by OER. Students older than typical age are more likely to come from lower SES backgrounds and often have more financial responsibilities than their younger peers (Goldrick-Rab & Han, 2011). In online courses, students report using their course materials more (Cuttler, 2019) and were more likely to take advantage of potentially helpful features in their OER (e.g., animations, videos, and links; Lindshield & Adhikari, 2013).
To test these ideas, a dataset from seven public postsecondary institutions (two and four year) in Maryland with 9,475 course outcomes was analyzed. Based on multilevel modeling findings, typically-aged students had higher grades with OER whereas OER did not reliably relate to the grades of students older than typical age. This was contrary to what was anticipated, but may be due to students older than typical age viewing course materials as investments and budget accordingly (Heagney & Benson, 2017). There were no differences between students in online and face to face courses. However, students older than typical age in face to face courses with OER had greater enrollment intensity (number of credits in a term). OER was not associated with withdrawal rate, contrary to previous findings. This may be due to the low withdrawal rate (6.2%) in this dataset causing floor effects. Future directions include a need to consider instructor effects and directly hearing student voices on OER.

Learning Outcomes:
This study examined how OER adoption interacted with student age and course modality in course grades, withdrawals, and course enrollment.
An overall benefit of OER adoption was found, but was limited to typically-aged students (no difference for students older than typical age).
There was no effect of OER adoption on course withdrawal rate for any groups.
An overall benefit of OER adoption on enrollment was found, but only for students older than typical age in face to face courses.

Speakers
avatar for MJ Bishop

MJ Bishop

Associate Vice Chancellor and Director, Kirwan Center for Academic Innovation, University System of Maryland
Dr. MJ Bishop directs the University System of Maryland’s William E. Kirwan Center for Academic Innovation, which was established in 2013 to enhance USM's position as a national leader in higher education transformation. The Kirwan Center conducts research on best practices, disseminates... Read More →
avatar for Virginia Clinton-Lisell

Virginia Clinton-Lisell

Assistant Professor, University of North Dakota
Dr. Virginia Clinton-Lisell began her career in education as an ESL teacher in New York City. She then obtained her PhD in Educational Psychology with a minor in Cognitive Science at the University of Minnesota where she was trained in educational research. She has published over... Read More →


Wednesday November 11, 2020 1:00pm - 1:25pm EST
Concurrent 1
  The Field, Presentation

1:00pm EST

OER Sustainability through Capacity Building, Equity & Research: Updates from the DOERS3 Initiative
Since its formation in 2017, the DOERS3 Initiative (Driving OER Sustainability for Student Success) has grown to include 23 member organizations that represent over 650 higher education institutions serving over 6 million students. This collaborative has focused on three main areas of OER sustainability as a means for student success: Capacity Building, Equity, and Research.

This panel is made up of three experienced DOERS3 leaders who will share updates and insights gained by their work within the focal areas of Capacity Building, Equity, and Research.

Topics to be covered are:
•The role of campus stores in listing and fulfilling OER
•The recognition of OER activities in the Tenure & Promotion process
•The role OER play in advancing equity
•The study of the impact OER has on student learning outcomes
•The navigation of the complex learning materials market

This session will start with a presentation on the exciting work of the DOERS3 Collaborative, include an interactive discussion between panelists on the learnings to date through the collaboration, and then move to audience Q&A so participants can engage with the presenters and raise pressing questions.

Learning Outcomes:
Attendees will learn about how this collaborative of systemwide, statewide, and provincewide OER initiatives is addressing topics such as how bookstore providers can improve OER listing and print fulfillment, recognition of OER activities in the tenure and promotion process, what role OER play in advancing equity, and creating a data archive to study the impact of OER on student learning outcomes.

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Corcoran

Kevin Corcoran

Executive Director, Digital Learning, Connecticut State Colleges & Universities
avatar for Andrew McKinney

Andrew McKinney

OER Coordinator, CUNY
avatar for James Hallmark

James Hallmark

Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, The Texas A&M University System
James Hallmark currently serves as Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs for the Texas A&M University System. In this position, Hallmark oversees all matters involving faculty, curriculum, student affairs, student success, enrollment management/admissions, and special projects for... Read More →
avatar for Clarenda Phillips

Clarenda Phillips

Provost and Vice President, Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi


Wednesday November 11, 2020 1:00pm - 1:25pm EST
Concurrent 5
  The Field, Presentation

1:30pm EST

Tea Time

"Tea time" is a break in scheduled programming when attendees can rest, practice self-care, or dive into networking or asynchronous sessions. There is no official programming during this time.

During this break, you can choose to take your tea time with VConnecting. Guests include Karen Cangialosi, Tanya Elias, Ariana Santiago, and Cynthia Orozco.

Alternatively, here is a set of themed lightning talks to consider. After tuning in to these short presentations, free to take the conversation to Discord and share your thoughts with others.

All About the Humanities:
Teaching Lysistrata in an Age of Protest
Student-created Open Educational Resources in a First-year Writing Context

Wednesday November 11, 2020 1:30pm - 1:55pm EST
All Together
  Community Connections, Break

1:30pm EST

VConnecting at Tea Time
Speakers
avatar for Karen Cangialosi

Karen Cangialosi

Professor, Keene State College
I am Professor of Biology and Open Education Faculty Fellow at Keene State College. I incorporate Open Pedagogy into my courses because of its great value in revolutionizing teaching and learning, and the ways in which it resonates very clearly with my passion for social justice... Read More →
avatar for Tanya Elias

Tanya Elias

Student, University of Calgary
I have been a open and distance education student for close to 25 years. I've seen a lot and learned a few things in that time. I'm currently working on an EdD at the University of Calgary (at a distance of course!) that is considering the implications of scale within Open Education... Read More →
avatar for Ariana Santiago

Ariana Santiago

OER Coordinator, University of Houston
avatar for Cynthia Orozco

Cynthia Orozco

Librarian, East Los Angeles College
avatar for Terry Greene

Terry Greene

eLearning Designer, Trent University

Planners
avatar for Regina Gong

Regina Gong

OER & Student Success Librarian, Michigan State University
I'm the Open Educational Resources (OER) & Student Success Librarian at Michigan State University (MSU). I've had extensive experience leading an OER program from the ground up at a community college where I used to work, and now at a land-grant, research university. You can ask me... Read More →


Wednesday November 11, 2020 1:30pm - 1:55pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Community Connections, Conversation

2:00pm EST

Wednesday Plenary: Sharon Leu & Dr. Harrison Keller
This session will feature two keynote talks offering perspectives on open education initiatives at different levels of government—from the U.S. Department of Education's Open Textbook Pilot to the Texas OER Grant Program. This session will explore the "bigger picture" of how OER can contribute to opportunities to improve educational practice, especially relating to the impacts of COVID-19. 

Speakers
avatar for Harrison Keller

Harrison Keller

Commissioner of Higher Education, State of Texas
Dr. Harrison Keller is the Commissioner of Higher Education for the State of Texas. He is a sixth-generation Texan with more than two decades of experience in educational budget and policy, digital learning, senior university administration, management, fundraising, and building effective... Read More →
avatar for Sharon Leu

Sharon Leu

Senior Policy Advisor, U.S. Department of Education Office of Educational Technology
Sharon leads the Office of Educational Technology’s higher education innovation initiatives that explore the complex ecosystem of lifelong, lifewide postsecondary learning and the opportunities technology provides to broaden access to education for all learners. Most recently, these... Read More →


Wednesday November 11, 2020 2:00pm - 3:25pm EST
All Together
  Plenary, Keynote

3:30pm EST

Tea Time
"Tea time" is a break in scheduled programming when attendees can rest, practice self-care, or dive into networking or asynchronous sessions. There is no scheduled programming during this time.

Click the Video Stream button above to join an informal follow-up conversation from this afternoon's plenary session.

If you choose, here is a set of themed lightning talks to consider. So, grab a favorite beverage and tune in to these short presentations. Feel free to take the conversation to Discord and share your thoughts with others.

Faculty Focused:
Faculty Cohort Program: Semester-Long Learning Community on OER​​​
Libraries and Centers for Teaching and Learning: A Match Made in OER Heaven​​​
KQED Media Academy: Designing Open PD that is Truly Open to All Educators​​​

Wednesday November 11, 2020 3:30pm - 3:55pm EST
All Together
  Community Connections, Break

4:00pm EST

Structural Wood/Masonry Design OER Manual & Recovering from COVID-19 in the Construction Industry
A discussion of current topics of structural wood design and structural masonry design conceived as open educational resources (OER) to comply with current construction code standards and practices, and how these provisions would help the student/apprentice advance in their Professional Engineering (PE) certification/recertification. A brief review of the limited technical-academic materials available today for the open public in these branches of applied knowledge of the construction industry. How these OER contributions may provide an effective boost to help alleviate the current trends of unemployment in a post-COVID-19 world. Review possible avenues for implementation of open source online courses as a valuable instrument to acquire the so-called annual Professional Development Hours (PDHs) required to grant or hold the Professional Engineering (PE) certification in Civil Engineering within the US. Review general US state's policies and guidelines of continuing education provisions in regards to qualified open education resources that could be shortly implemented and adapted to advance the workforce in post-COVID-19 scenario.

Learning Outcomes:
Understand the impact of effective hands-on OER learning tools to prepare the student/apprentice to become familiar with codes, standards, and specifications commonly used in the design fortimber/masonry structures and edifications.
Encompass different scaffolds employed towards helping the student/apprentice to successfully obtain recertification of the Professional Engineering (PE) license in Civil Engineering withinthe US.
Recognize the selection of key concepts, techniques and examples.

Speakers
avatar for Antonio Velazquez

Antonio Velazquez

Assistant Professor, Savannah State University
avatar for Maziar Moaveni

Maziar Moaveni

Assistant Professor, Savannah State University


Wednesday November 11, 2020 4:00pm - 4:25pm EST
Concurrent 4
  COVID-19, Presentation

4:00pm EST

Open Pedagogy for Hyflex or Online Learning: Examples from HiEd
Click here for session SLIDES. For today's presentation, I aim to spend about 2 minutes on the pedagogy section, 10 minutes on the first three examples (slides # 10 - 13), and 3 minutes on the model for incorporating different considerations. This should leave us time to touch on other matters as prioritized by your chat and Q&A.  :)
The presentation slides contain more extensive information, and I hope they may engender continued discussion beyond this session! Contact me at maeve.dion@unh.edu

Session Description:


Whether on campus or online, students can benefit from open education … but only if we design our courses and assignments appropriately to our varied student audiences and their learning conditions. In the current pandemic situation, students’ learning environments may alter throughout the semester or academic year. Principles of open pedagogy and online learning can help us better prepare for the flexibility required in uncertain times.

We need to design participatory models and student engagement activities that facilitate student agency and accessible learning in a multitude of circumstances. This presentation offers some examples from undergraduate, in-class/hybrid courses as well as graduate, asynchronous online courses and adaptations for the hyflex model.

The needs of our different learners also mean that we cannot just establish one curriculum design and use that for all of our open courses. Rather, we should be customizing the curriculum and learning activities based on the pedagogical principles appropriate to the level and expectations of learners, the modality(ies) of the learning experience, and our own fundamental teaching beliefs.

This presentation concludes with a model of one approach for determining appropriate pedagogical theory, principles, and best practices for any given combination of these factors (learners, modalities, teaching philosophies). By demonstration, the particular set of factors underlying the earlier examples of participation/engagement are used to show alignment, but this model can be used to tweak or overhaul curricula based on any chosen set of factors.

Whatever your philosophy of teaching, you have a developed (or developing) teaching identity, and your beliefs/identity can be integrated into an accessible and open approach to teaching and learning.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Explore different options to increase flexibility for participation/engagement when students’ learning conditions change.
  • Consider small or large changes to integrate open pedagogy and more accessible learning in your next class.
  • Discuss a planning technique to help align curriculum design and learning activities with pedagogical principles.
  • Imagine ways to implement open pedagogy in an approach consistent with your own teaching philosophy/identity.

Speakers
avatar for Maeve Dion

Maeve Dion

Assistant Professor of Security Studies, University of New Hampshire
My pedagogical emphases include constructivism, andragogy, collaborative learning, open education, and universal design for learning. I teach cybersecurity and homeland security at the University of New Hampshire, where I direct the online M.S. in Cybersecurity Policy and Risk Management... Read More →


Wednesday November 11, 2020 4:00pm - 4:25pm EST
Concurrent 5
  Practices, Presentation

4:00pm EST

The Open Pedagogy Incubator as a Model for Building an Online Community to Support Open Pedagogy
How can we build sustainable open education programs that nurtures a growing community of faculty participants? How can we model the unique power of open-enabled pedagogy in the face of publishers’ co-option of textbook affordability with inclusive access programs? How can we introduce and support emerging models of open education that center faculty expertise and student agency in an environment of shrinking budgets and precarity? And how can we do all those things in the middle of a global pandemic? At our institution, one answer has been the Open Pedagogy Incubator - a Libraries program that brings together a cohort of faculty instructors to develop competencies in open pedagogy through a series of hands-on workshops, curated readings, and cohort discussions.

As a window into these questions about openness, community, and shared agency, a team of two librarian facilitators and two faculty participants will introduce the Incubator and situate it in the broader context of open education and open pedagogy. We will discuss the design and aims of this project and offer the Incubator as one promising model for sustainable open education work. We will also offer reflections on the successes and challenges we encountered in our pilot season and suggest strategies for bringing this model to other institutions in a way that reflects local needs and experiences.

With one model on the table, and more in the works, we will lead a discussion about different experiences of introducing and supporting open pedagogy as well as how to build open communities online. We will begin with small group breakout rooms where we will facilitate discussion about these issues and invite other models and approaches. These ideas and questions will be gathered in Padlet and shared with the full group. Next we will use those to frame a full group conversation about how the open community can engage with these models as a way to reimagine open education as a values-driven community of practice.

Participants will leave with new models for supporting open pedagogy as well as critical discussion on the opportunities and challenges of those models. After this discussion we hope we all will be better prepared to explore and evaluate open pedagogy as a set of practices and values that can be applied any time as well as tools for building a community that reflects local context and shared values of agency, equity, and openness.



Learning Outcomes:
Our attendees will be introduced to and invited to learn from the first iteration of our Open Pedagogy Incubator model as a precursor for a wider critical discussion about working with faculty to implement similar open pedagogical practices into their courses. Our session attendees will learn from our panel’s and other attendees unique experiences of stimulating and facilitating local interest in order to build a sustainable values-driven community.

Speakers
avatar for Will Cross

Will Cross

Director, Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center, NC State University Libraries
I'm excited about the relationship between copyright, student agency, and open culture. Recently I've been focused on the Library Copyright Institute, the Open Pedagogy Incubator, the Scholarly Communication Notebook, and the Best Practices for Fair Use in Open Education... Read More →
avatar for Carlos C. Goller

Carlos C. Goller

Associate Teaching Professor, North Carolina State University
I am an Associate Teaching Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences and teach in the Biotechnology Program (BIT) at North Carolina State University. I am very interested in integrating open practices in the courses I teach. I believe strongly in non-throwaway assignments... Read More →
avatar for David Tully

David Tully

Libraries Fellow, North Carolina State University Libraries
Librarian at NC State University. Interests include Open Education, Development, Assessment and Outreach.As a Fellow I am leading a strategic initiative which places our Libraries at the heart of the University’s effort to support vulnerable students, especially those who are economically... Read More →
avatar for Erin McKenney

Erin McKenney

Assistant Professor | Director of Undergraduate Programs, North Carolina State University
I make science accessible and relatable, for students of all ages as well as the general public. I design innovative experiments that engage participants in authentic research, and translate the results into compelling stories about microbial ecology. As an educator, I cultivate critical... Read More →


Wednesday November 11, 2020 4:00pm - 4:55pm EST
Concurrent 2
  Collaborations, Interactive Discussion

4:00pm EST

Digital Storytelling Workshop: The Three Ps of Sharing the OER Story
Strong stories are the fabric of effective communications; they can share experiences, humanize statistics, highlight needs, convey emotions, change minds, and move audiences to action. In our increasingly digital world, online storytelling is essential to any communications strategy—since March, internet use has increased by 25 percent and social media use has increased by more than 20 percent. Compelling online storytelling is more important than ever to cut through the noise, grab attention, and help make OER more accessible, understandable, and appealing.

This interactive session will cover the three Ps of digital storytelling: Perspective, Platform, and Persistence. The Three P’s can help you strategically share your OER stories. Through a series of exercises and examples of strong stories inside and outside the education sector, this session will change the way you tell--and amplify--your OER stories online. It will give you the tools you need to start integrating more stories into your digital communications strategy to reach and engage your audiences with the benefits of OER.


Learning Outcomes:
You will learn how to extend the reach and power of your OER stories online, including user-centered design and outreach, gathering user-generated content, the differences between various social media and web platforms, which platforms are best to reach your target audiences, and how to market your content across multiple channels over a longer period of time.

Speakers
avatar for Kelsey Howe

Kelsey Howe

Senior Account Executive, GMMB
avatar for Garth Moore

Garth Moore

Senior Vice President, Digital, GMMB


Wednesday November 11, 2020 4:00pm - 4:55pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Open Education 101, Workshop

4:00pm EST

The Year in U.S. OER Policy: Where We Are and What's Next
More than a decade of coordinated OER advocacy has paid off with significant victories. Congress allocated, and then renewed twice, the first-ever federal funding for higher education OER grant programs, and numerous significant state-level policy initiatives have led to increased adoption, awareness, and creation of open educational resources. Meanwhile, the millions of dollars allocated to educational institutions as part of the COVID-19 response bill, the CARES Act, opened up a new source of potential funding for OER initiatives during a period of unprecedented fiscal crisis for America's education institutions.

This session will provide attendees with an overview of the past year in U.S. OER policy from advocates engaged in the day-to-day work. We’ll review exciting developments from the past year and provide a look into what goes into big policy wins, along with analysis of what the long-term impact of these policies will be. We’ll also share insight into what’s next for OER policy, including any efforts brewing in Congress and federal agencies post-election, which states and policy trends to watch, and how OER advocates can best take action in their communities.

Federal and state policy are important for supporting the OER movement, providing districts and institutions with frameworks and resources, and sustaining the momentum that brought the movement to where it is today. Without the passion and dedication of OER advocacy efforts, these policy wins wouldn’t be possible.

Learning Outcomes:
After the session, attendees will be able to:
- Explain key developments in U.S. state and federal policy related to OER over the last year
- Identify ways COVID-19 will impact the next policy cycle
- Apply tips for contacting their policymakers to advocate for OER

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Director of Open Education, SPARC
Nicole Allen is the Director of Open Education at SPARC, a global coalition working to make open the default in research and education. A decade and a half ago, Nicole was an undergraduate student frustrated with the cost of textbooks. Today, she is an internationally recognized policy... Read More →
avatar for Reg Leichty

Reg Leichty

Founding Partner, Foresight Law + Policy
With over two decades of legal, policy, and lobbying experience, Reg advises education leaders, national associations, and other stakeholders about the federal laws, regulations, and programs that directly impact and support efforts to expand and improve educational opportunities... Read More →
avatar for Scott Hochberg

Scott Hochberg

Policy Advisor, OpenStax / Rice University
I served twenty years as a member of the Texas House of Representatives, specializing in education issues, and passed Texas first OER legislation, as well as other open government measures. Talk to me about effectively telling the OER story to policymakers.
avatar for Kaitlyn Vitez

Kaitlyn Vitez

Higher Education Campaigns Director, U.S. PIRG
Kaitlyn serves as the Student PIRGs' lobbyist on Capitol Hill, working on campaigns to make college more affordable and protect student loan borrowers. She has been a leading voice for students in opposition to access codes, the Cengage-McGraw Hill merger, and automatic textbook billing... Read More →


Wednesday November 11, 2020 4:00pm - 4:55pm EST
Concurrent 1
  Strategies, Panel

4:30pm EST

Breaking Barriers: Understanding and Removing Barriers to OER Use
NOTE: This session is pre-recorded. It will be streamed live over zoom with the speaker present to answer questions in the chat and after the presentation.

New and experienced faculty members face many barriers when attempting to incorporate Open Educational Resources (OER) into their courses. Research has shown that awareness, funding, time, and institutional supports are factors in faculty using or not using OER. The purpose of this research was to investigate the barriers that business faculty in Ontario colleges face when using OER within their teaching practices and determine if faculty have recommendations to overcome the barriers to using OER.

Based on a review of the literature on OER and the barriers business faculty experience when using OER, a mixed-method approach was used in this research. Potential participants were business faculty in Ontario. Data was collected via a survey and follow-up interviews. Seventy-two respondents from 12 Ontario colleges responded to the survey. Nine participated in follow-up interviews. Respondents were asked about their experiences using OER, the barriers they faced, and solutions to overcome them.

A thematic and cross tabulation analysis of the responses demonstrated that faculty are introduced to OER in many different ways, and institutions have unique approaches to supporting faculty with OER. Faculty experience barriers to using OER, such as no suitable resources, awareness, knowledge, support, institutional processes, and other reasons. Faculty outlined ways to overcome such barriers, including but not limited to improved professional development, creation of new high-quality content, time to create the resources, and enhanced collaboration and networking efforts.

This talk will review some of the research findings and recommendations that were made as a result of an examination of the faculty barriers and solutions to overcome the barriers to using OER.

Please note: the above session description is adapted from the author's Thesis abstract.


Learning Outcomes:
After attending this session, attendees should have an understanding of:

- Barriers faculty face when attempting to use OER;

- Solutions faculty have used, or they believe could be used to overcome the barriers to using OER; and

- Recommended suggestions for decision-makers to support faculty with OER usage.

Speakers
avatar for Brandon Carson

Brandon Carson

Learning Technologies Specialist / Professor / Student, Durham College / Fanshawe College / Ontario Tech / Royal Roads University / Athabasca University


Wednesday November 11, 2020 4:30pm - 4:55pm EST
Concurrent 4
  Challenges, Presentation

4:30pm EST

Faculty, Librarians, and Designers, Oh My!: Rounding Out a System-Wide Advocacy Team
As open education maintains its momentum deeper into the use of open educational resources (OER) and beyond it to open and OER-enabled pedagogy, it becomes increasingly important that our advocacy teams are well rounded and well supported. Does your team have the expertise and support it needs to be an effective advocacy team?

Since its inception, Affordable Learning Georgia (ALG) has maintained a team of specialists and advocates on each of the University System of Georgia (USG) institutions. At the start, there were two roles within each institution: an instructional Campus Champion and a Library Coordinator. In 2020, we looked at our advocacy team and our grants program and realized several things:

  1. Grant projects that involved a librarian usually resulted in more copyright-conscious materials and better use of institutional library resources such as LibGuides.
  2. Grant projects that involved an instructional designer usually resulted in better student success rates and more positive student feedback.
  3. Despite the request for one instructional Campus Champion and one Library Coordinator from each institution, the scales had tipped heavily toward library representation.
  4. We were ready to put more emphasis on the pedagogical strategies and benefits of open education—which meant we needed more instructional design input.

We restructured our advocacy team to be more well-rounded with three roles: Faculty Champions, now specifically selected from instructional faculty; Library Champions; and Design Champions, selected from instructional designers. The addition of a dedicated design role is one piece of our next step in moving open education and the use of affordable resources forward in the USG.

Combined with the recent jump-start of our professional development efforts, this restructuring prompted the development of a welcome training specifically designed to prepare newly appointed ALG Champions for the advocacy work they would be doing on their campuses in line with the strategic goals of ALG. The welcome training is just one of the ways we are supporting our system-wide advocacy team and improving the sustainability of our advocacy efforts.

In this presentation, participants will hear from the leaders of ALG on the prompting and process of rounding out the expertise of our system-wide team of advocates and the professional development and collaborative efforts in development to support it.

After attending this presentation, attendees will be able to:
  1. Examine their OER advocacy team and develop a plan for “rounding it out.”
  2. Develop a plan for supporting their advocacy team through professional development and collaboration.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Gallant

Jeff Gallant

Program Director, Affordable Learning Georgia, Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia
avatar for Tiffani Reardon

Tiffani Reardon

Affordable Learning Georgia Program Manager, University System of Georgia
Talk to me about: instructional design, tech com/writing, accessibility, oer, open pedagogy, dogs, cats, geek stuff


Wednesday November 11, 2020 4:30pm - 4:55pm EST
Concurrent 5
  Strategies, Presentation

5:00pm EST

How a Multi-Institutional Collaboration Leveraged Undiscovered Expertise and Sparked Innovation
WATCH THE VIDEO AND JOIN THE TWITTER CHAT! #Collaboration #OpenEd20

Collaboration across the provincial college system has been limited in practice because it has not been widely encouraged, explored, or supported. When funding models do not support cross-institutional opportunities then colleges miss out the benefits of collaboration. Subsequently, educators tend to gravitate to the familiar, siloed textbook and learning materials creation projects within the walls of their own institutions.

In this presentation we will reflect on what we learned from our project that took a multi-institutional collaborative approach to building open educational resources (OER). This project included students, faculty and support specialists working together to create resources that were meaningful to them. Explore with us this idea of people working collaboratively, building relationships, and influencing change as a way to reimagine and sustain OPEN education

Learning Outcomes:
Hear from two authors who led a team of remote collaborators through the curation, creation, and publishing of an OER during a Pandemic.

Contrast the benefits and challenges of a multi-institutional collaboration approach to building Open Educational Resources (OER).

Discuss the sustainability of this approach to building relationships and influencing change in open education.

Speakers
avatar for Marie Rutherford

Marie Rutherford

Professor, Georgian College CAAT
avatar for Kimberlee Carter

Kimberlee Carter

Professor/Faculty, Conestoga College ITAL
Hi I am a Professor in The Business School at Conestoga College ITAL in Kitchener, Ontario Canada. Prior to teaching, I worked in a variety of front-line health office administration roles in hospitals. I have been Influenced by education leaders like bell hooks and Stephen Brookfield... Read More →


Wednesday November 11, 2020 5:00pm - 5:25pm EST
Concurrent 5
  Collaborations, Presentation

5:00pm EST

Using Free & Open Digital Texts with K-12 Readers: Curating Quality Resources from Global Sources
During the global Covid-19 pandemic of 2020, issues of access to educational resources became a prominent issue and challenge in K-12 settings. Even with the right technology hardware, access to digital resources and texts became another challenge. As some public library systems and/or school libraries were not open or nearby, access to digital texts became necessary and vital to maintaining student's reading skills and providing equity in reading. Prior to the pandemic, digital e-texts have provided ways for readers to use mobile devices, tablets, and other versatile resources to engage with reading.
Building on the idea of #keeplearning and #keepteaching, this session provides examples of free and accessible e-texts and mobile apps that can be of use to K-12 readers, teacher educators, and librarians. This session has a global focus and is specific to the Covid-19 pandemic in that young readers around the world need broader access to digital text as learning shifted and continues to shift to online settings. Additionally, text needs to be of quality to engage young readers across a wide variety of genres as does the ability to access multilingual e-texts. Learn more about the wide variety of digital and multi-modal texts that become possibilities for reading material for K-12 readers in virtual and home-school settings during and beyond the pandemic. K-12 students, educators, and families, who come from diverse language backgrounds need such access to quality texts, tools, and resources to develop their literacy skills in engaging ways. Participants will be provided a list of free digital reading titles, websites, and other resources that will help K-12 students’ literacy development. Ideas to build, remix, and create free digital texts for K-12 readers, including both fiction and non-fiction will also be shared. Examples of library-sponsored resources, non-profit resources, and resources curated by the United Nations will be curated and shared. Connections and alignment to the United Nations sustainable development goals will be explored. Information will be posted to an open blog so that comments can be made and resources can be easily shared.

Learning Outcomes:
Participants will familiarize themselves with the definition of quality digital texts for K-12 readers.

Participants will discuss characteristics of quality of free and accessible e-text for K-12 readers including texts that focus specifically on health literacy and Covid-19 topics in particular..

Participants will design and develop ideas for integrating open digital e-text for K-12 readers into teacher education courses, library programs, nonprofit use, and other contexts.

Speakers
avatar for Peggy Semingson

Peggy Semingson

Associate Professor, The University of Texas at Arlington


Wednesday November 11, 2020 5:00pm - 5:25pm EST
Concurrent 2
  COVID-19, Presentation

5:00pm EST

Designing a Queer-Inclusive Human Sexuality Course Using OER
As an instructor for Human Sexuality, I have had a difficult time finding a traditional textbook that contained the content and language I wanted so that my course could be inclusive of queer and trans bodies and experiences. This summer, I redesigned my course to feature OER rather than a traditional textbook while participating in an OER Learning Circle hosted by the Minnesota State System. In this session, I will walk through the steps I took during the design process, including setting course-level and module-level learning objectives, creating new assessments aligned with the objectives and supported by the OER, and collaborating with peers in the learning circle. Additionally, I will discuss how you can determine the level of queer and trans inclusion in your sexuality and gender content, how to find new sources for OER related to sexuality and gender, and how to create a sexuality course that is not only queer-inclusive, but intersectional, centering folks marginalized by racism, ableism, and classism, among other systems of oppression.

Learning Outcomes:
1) Identify new sources for Human Sexuality OER
2) Critique the level of inclusivity in existing Human Sexuality course instructional materials

Speakers
avatar for Kathryn Klement

Kathryn Klement

Assistant Prof of Psychology of Women & Gender, Bemidji State University
If you'd like a copy of my presentation materials, they're in this dropbox folder: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/juwbezqhwkk34ic/AAA1Q_ozVa8eIPhxSyHB-_Fra?dl=0


Wednesday November 11, 2020 5:00pm - 5:25pm EST
Concurrent 4
  Social Justice, Presentation

5:00pm EST

OER Advocacy as Part of a Library-led Textbook Affordability Initiative with Student Government
College and university advocates for open educational resources (OER) increasingly find that work combined and aligned with broader campus efforts aimed at reducing the cost burden of course materials for students. In such cases, it is crucial that OER advocates are able to support their discovery, use, and creation as one component of a multi-pronged affordability plan that can obtain buy-in from students, administrators, and faculty from across the academic divisions. In this presentation I will explain the development of such an initiative, led by the Franklin & Marshall College Library, and its implementation in collaboration with members of our student government and a committee comprised of faculty, students, and professional staff.

A major focus of the new initiative has been fact gathering, and I will discuss the results of two successful surveys conducted last academic year. The 2019 Faculty Course Materials Survey and the 2020 Student Textbook Spending Survey were designed to be complementary and capture as complete a picture as possible of the situation at Franklin & Marshall. They were also created with the goal of finding ways to immediately improve the situation for those students who were going without required books and other materials due to cost, or were having their course selection and performance negatively impacted by the incredibly high costs of materials. I will also share some of the actionable steps which we have identified and are recommending based on the survey results. I will conclude with practical advice for others interested in starting or expanding one on their campus.

Learning Outcomes:
Attendees will learn 1) how to connect OER to the issue of affordability, 2) ways to conduct surveys of faculty and students which provide data valuable to OER and affordability advocacy, and 3) ideas for how to build faculty support for OER and various affordability strategies they can employ.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Barnes

Christopher Barnes

Scholarly Communications Librarian, Franklin & Marshall College


Wednesday November 11, 2020 5:00pm - 5:25pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Strategies, Presentation

5:00pm EST

Planned Research Study on Impact of No-Cost/Low-Cost Schedule Designation
A research team in Oregon seeks to determine whether the no-cost/low-cost schedule designation required at Oregon’s community colleges and universities by HB 2871 has an effect on student enrollment behavior. Additionally, we seek to determine whether the no-cost/low-cost schedule designation has an effect on course completion and whether there is a different effect for traditionally underserved student populations. This presentation will share our study design and planned research method. The results of this study will help us answer questions from faculty, bookstore managers, and other stakeholders about the impact of the schedule designation.

Our research questions are as follows:

1.Does the presence of no-cost/low-cost schedule designation affect student enrollment behavior?
2.Is there a significant difference in enrollment intensity in courses with the no-cost/low-cost schedule designation compared to courses without the designation?
3.Is there a significant difference in course enrollment, course fill rate, or enrollment intensity if the data is disaggregated as follows: part-time vs full-time status, race/ethnicity, Pell grant eligibility, age, and sex/gender?

Learning Outcomes:
1. Attendees will become familiar with this project and the projected research process.

2. Attendees will be given contact information and the opportunity to offer feedback on this project in the coming year.

3. Attendees will be given the opportunity to discuss future collaboration.

Link to slides: https://tinyurl.com/designationstudy

Link to more info on research question and data request: https://tinyurl.com/designationstudymethod

Speakers
avatar for Amy Hofer

Amy Hofer

Coordinator, Statewide Open Education Library Serv, Open Oregon Educational Resources
Amy Hofer, Coordinator, Statewide Open Education Library Services, is the OER librarian for Oregon's 24 community colleges and universities. You can visit the Open Oregon Educational Resources website at openoregon.org. By night she is a fiddler and square dance caller.
avatar for Jennifer Lantrip

Jennifer Lantrip

Interim Library Coordinator, Umpqua Community College
avatar for Shauna McNulty

Shauna McNulty

Assistant Professor, Umpqua Community College


Wednesday November 11, 2020 5:00pm - 5:25pm EST
Concurrent 1
  The Field, Presentation

5:30pm EST

Tea Time
"Tea time" is a break in scheduled programming when attendees can rest, practice self-care, or dive into networking or asynchronous sessions. There is no scheduled programming during this time.

If you choose, here is a set of themed lightning talks to consider. So, grab a favorite beverage and tune in to these short presentations. Feel free to take the conversation to Discord and share your thoughts with others.

Luck of the Draw:
Write Once, Publish Everywhere: Developing an Efficient Workflow for Multiplatform OER Publishing
Boots on the Ground: Leveraging Practitioners Perspectives on Open Education in New England
Education Without Borders

Wednesday November 11, 2020 5:30pm - 5:55pm EST
All Together
  Community Connections, Break

5:30pm EST

Dungeons & Dragons
UPDATE (Wednesday evening) - 
This game is being rescheduled for Saturday afternoon so that more people can attend. If you're interested in joining the Saturday game, please add your contact info in the Google Doc below.


Are you a fan of the classic Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game? Let’s play together! 
We’re running a short adventure for level 1 characters, using the virtual tabletop program Roll20 (free, account required). Sign up for a session in this D&D at Open Ed Google Doc, so that we can contact players ahead of time.  Do so early if you want to create your own character. Otherwise, we have premade characters ready to go. 

About the session:  
For decades, Ellaria Feywing, known as the Master of Merriam Vale, has trained and mentored groups of young adventurers in exploration, magic, and fighting. When you and your friends completed your training and bade Ellaria farewell just three days ago, you didn’t know that you would be her final students. She died in her sleep that very night, but she left you a message in her will...it appears she has one more task for you.


Planners
avatar for Matt Ruen

Matt Ruen

Scholarly Communications Outreach Coordinator, Grand Valley State University
avatar for Michelle Goodridge

Michelle Goodridge

Liaison Librarian, Wilfrid Laurier University
Wilfrid Laurier University


Wednesday November 11, 2020 5:30pm - 8:30pm EST
Concurrent 5
  Community Connections, Activity

6:00pm EST

Choose Your Own Adventure
Wednesday November 11, 2020 6:00pm - 6:55pm EST
All Together
  Community Connections, Activity

6:00pm EST

Self-Care
Feeling the effects of three days of virtual conferencing? Take this time just for yourself to practice self-care. Depending on your time of day and relevant safety considerations, here are some suggestions to think about. What other ideas do you have? Share them here!

  • Take a walk outside and get some fresh air
  • Make a pot of your favorite tea (or other beverage) and sip it somewhere quiet with book or magazine
  • Take out a pen and do a crossword puzzle, sudoku, or other game to stretch your mental muscles away from the computer
  • Do some yoga, meditation, or mindfulness exercises
  • Call or message a friend who you haven't had time to connect with lately

Wednesday November 11, 2020 6:00pm - 6:55pm EST
Concurrent 4
  Community Connections, Activity

6:00pm EST

Wednesday Trivia
You asked for it! Tuesday Tea Time Trivia was such a hit that there's a redux. Join to play trivia and win a prize.

Wednesday November 11, 2020 6:00pm - 6:55pm EST
Concurrent 3
  Community Connections, Activity

6:00pm EST

“Among Us”: OER Edition
Among Us is a hit party game about teamwork and betrayal! You and your crewmates can play this game online and attempt to keep your spaceship together. It's important that each of you cooperate with one another in order to return back to civilization.

The game takes place in a space-themed setting, in which players each take on one of two roles, most being Crewmates, and a predetermined number being Impostors. The goal of the Crewmates is to identify the Impostors, eliminate them, and complete tasks around the map; the Impostors' goal is to covertly sabotage and kill the Crewmates before they complete all of their tasks.

You will need to download the free App (works on Android, iPhone/iPad, and Windows, but for Mac OSX you'd need to download an emulator like Bluestack).

Planners
avatar for Ethan Senack

Ethan Senack

Chief of Staff, ISKME


Wednesday November 11, 2020 6:00pm - 7:00pm EST
Concurrent 2
  Community Connections, Activity

7:00pm EST

Late Show
Each day will end with an informal conversation with the organizers and members of the conference community. The Late Show will debrief the day so far, provide tips on what’s ahead, and opportunities to get to know different perspectives in the field. Tune into the Zoom meeting to participate!

The Wednesday late show will feature information about Creative Commons from a long-time Creative Commons Certificate facilitator, Jonathan Poritz, and updates about some awesome OER efforts in Colorado from Spencer Ellis and Massachusetts from Bob Awkward. 

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Poritz

Jonathan Poritz

OER Coordinator, Colorado State University Pueblo
Talk to me about: open pedagogy, making OER the default, OER and student success, OER and academic freedom, FLOSS, OER and equity, JITERs, crypto (ask me about blockchains if you want to see someone's head explode in slow-motion), quantum computation, differential geometry, number... Read More →
RA

Robert Awkward

Assistant Commissioner for Academic Effectiveness, Mass. Department of Higher Education
Robert J. Awkward, Ph.D.Biographical SummaryDr. Robert J. Awkward currently directs a state-wide learning outcomes assessment program at the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education. The mission of the learning outcomes assessment program is to advance and deepen the culture of... Read More →
avatar for Spencer Ellis

Spencer Ellis

Director of Educational Innovation, Colorado Department of Higher Education

Planners
avatar for Emily Ragan

Emily Ragan

Associate Professor, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Excited about reimagining effective education. Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and OER Coordinator at Metropolitan State University of Denver
avatar for Hailey Babb

Hailey Babb

Open Education Coordinator, SPARC


Wednesday November 11, 2020 7:00pm - 7:25pm EST
All Together
  Community Connections, Conversation

7:30pm EST

Our Powers Combined: An Open Ed Collaboration Between a Librarian and a Professor
In 2018, GSU Associate Professor of Sociology Kathy Dolan and Assistant Professor Librarian Jennie Law were awarded an Affordable Learning Georgia mini-grant to support the creation of ancillary materials for the OpenStax Sociology textbook. This lightning talk includes discussion on the successful collaboration on the original project, the plan for ongoing stewardship of their materials, and the continual usage of the project materials in the classroom and library.



Speakers
avatar for Kathy Dolan

Kathy Dolan

Associate Professor, Georgia State University
avatar for Jennie Law

Jennie Law

Assistant Professor & Librarian, Georgia State University


Wednesday November 11, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Collaborations, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Oh wE aRe in the Dark! [OER in the Dark!] Reconnecting Learning in Disconnected Spaces
In a COVID-19 pandemic learning environment, faculty and students may feel like they are ‘working in the dark’, as they remain disconnected from each other with exchanges mediated through a virtual delivery platform. Disconnection may be exacerbated by attempts to teach and learn with rolling power outages, and experiences with weak connectivity due to limited services, accessibility, and basic equipment. The unprecedented changes to the way we are expected to teach and learn is only further exacerbated for vulnerable populations encountering financial stability, food insecurity, and limited or no health coverage. Affordability of education remains a roadblock for students encountering financial hardships. In the USA, the cost of attending a 4-year public university has increased by 31% from 2007 to 2017 (U.S. Ed. Dept., 2019). The required closure by government mandated “stay-at-home” orders caused massive layoffs for students. The students who are often disproportionately impacted are low-income students who are more likely to be women, members of underrepresented ethnic minority groups, and first-generation college students (Carnevale & Smith, 2018). With a lack of quality digital access to learn remotely, students must ultimately decide if financial hardships will force them to disrupt their studies. Across the nation, degree completion rates, academic quality, and affordability are the three greatest challenges in higher education for students, their learning, and student academic success (Colvard, Watson & Park, 2018). Some departments were prepared to respond rapidly to alternative delivery modalities due to ongoing efforts with the Affordable Learning Solutions (AL$) initiative that eliminated textbook costs by providing no-cost digitized resources for students. Textbook affordability is a pressing issue that relates directly to retention and graduation rates. The use of OER to reduce costs for students revealed challenges that were embedded in the technological design solution which was intended to level the uneven playing field. Different levels of digital distress are evident for students who rely heavily on the university campus onsite resources to complete their class assignments with OER materials for courses. We discuss challenges encountered for modifying OER for off-line use. Steps for attendees to consider at their own campuses when responding to improving the integration of OER in university classroom courses are provided.

Learning Outcomes: This session includes the benefits with using OER in reducing textbook costs during a rapid switch to alternative virtual delivery format mid-semester. We discuss challenges encountered for modifying OER for off-line use. Steps for attendees to consider when responding to improving the integration of OER in university classroom courses are provided, with the intent of access on or before the first day of classes to ensure equity in the distribution of educational resources.

Speakers
avatar for Elaine Correa

Elaine Correa

Professor and Chair, California State University, Bakersfield
avatar for Sandra Bozarth

Sandra Bozarth

Library Dept. Chair, California State University, Bakersfield


Wednesday November 11, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  COVID-19, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Pushing Open During an Unprecedented Pandemic
During the last six months, members of the Online Education team at Western Colorado University have had unprecedented access to faculty curriculum. Library and Online Education Director Dustin Fife and Instructional Technologist Kimberly Yadon have used every opportunity available to them to insert Open resources into their own classes and the curriculum of their colleagues. They have found that a little bit of preparation before conversations about Online Education in general has led to the adoption of OER by several faculty. By having resources in mind when they were called upon to discuss any aspect of online pedagogy, Dustin and Kimberly have found they have been able to convince faculty who might not have been interested in the past.

Since the Online Education department manages Canvas, the learning Management System at Western, and has been helping move numerous faculty to online or remote learning environments, there has been no shortage of opportunities to initiate conversations about OER. Dustin and Kimberly are committed to not wasting this crisis by leveraging their positions in Online Education to always champion Open Education. They will be discussing how to identify appropriate resources before any conversation, identify faculty most likely to adopt, and build momentum at a small, public university.

Learning Outcomes: Strategies for identifying resources before conversations.

Identifying possible partners and faculty on the fly.

Learning to "never let a good crises go to waste."

Speakers
avatar for Kimberly Yadon

Kimberly Yadon

Instructional Technologist & Designer, Western Colorado University
avatar for Dustin Fife

Dustin Fife

Director of Library Services and Online Education, Western Colorado University


Wednesday November 11, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  COVID-19, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Redefining the Textbook and Embedding Calculators for Online Exams
With the OER model, we can now customize the textbook that we use by adding videos, interactive visualizations, and even games directly into the book. Using the LibreTexts platform, the presenter has taken the OpenStax Statistics textbook and embedded it with over 100 such activities to create materials that address all learning styles. Although, the presentation will demonstrate how this was done for the statistics class, this model can be used for any class.
We will also look at how such materials can be directly embedded into online exams using the iFrame. As many of us have had to move our courses to online, we struggle with how to create secure proctored exams where students still have the use of a calculator. One solution is to embed the calculator directly into the exam. The presenter will demonstrate how this is done using the Canvas LMS and LibreTexts calculator. This can be extended to other LMSs and other materials.

Learning Outcomes: 1. Replace static textbooks with OER books that include multimedia, interactive visualizations, and learning games.
2. Using iFrames to directly embed calculators and other OER information directly into exam questions so that students have access to the allowed exam materials while using an online proctoring system.

Speakers
avatar for Larry Green

Larry Green

Faculty, Lake Tahoe Community College


Wednesday November 11, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  COVID-19, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Striving for affordability and access: Reimagining undergraduate courses in times of COVID-19
The onslaught of the COVID-19 pandemic sent colleges and universities around the globe into a frenzy to transition their learning environments in ways that would sustain and support student success in times of uncertainty and perceived impossibility. At the University of Pikeville in eastern Kentucky, predicament turned into opportunity for improvement as the university made bold decisions to remove barriers to student learning in the undergraduate context. These decisions include transitioning the academic calendar, eliminating textbook costs for students, providing technical and pedagogical training for faculty, and creating peer-led learning communities to support faculty during their course redesign efforts. Session participants will learn about faculty workshops for OER selection, course redesign with OER-focused outcomes, and challenges to universal OER adoption.

As a result of this presentation, participants will:
  • Learn about the potential benefits of block scheduling in relation to traditional semester schedules;
  • Consider the rationale for open educational resources as a no-cost alternative to traditional textbooks and for-cost course materials; 
  • Take away a model for course redesign that prioritizes flexibility and essential outcomes; and
  • Understand some of the lessons learned from UPIKE’s experiences to date in making learning more affordable and accessible.  

Speakers
avatar for Ella Smith-Justice

Ella Smith-Justice

Assistant Dean & Professor of Spanish, University of Pikeville
avatar for Jennifer Dugan

Jennifer Dugan

Dean - College of Arts and Sciences, University of Pikeville
Focused on authentic innovations in the liberal arts and sciences, inclusive excellence, and meaningful professional development for faculty and staff


Wednesday November 11, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  COVID-19, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

They Made it Look Effortless: OER in Faculty Professional Development in a Pandemic
In this lightning talk, viewers will hear several instructional designers at Boise State University discuss how a training session on OER was developed during the COVID-19 pandemic to assist faculty in quickly switching from in-person to remote instruction. Each speaker will present a different aspect of how the training session—which was part of a larger faculty development initiative at Boise State—was designed and implemented, including how OER was ‘organically’ curated for this session. Speakers will address licensing and usage, including attribution and other requirements as set forth by the author of the OER that was used. In addition, the speakers will discuss the application of OER as a modeling tool for appropriate usage for the faculty’s own courses. Speakers will also address innovative solutions to challenges that come up during delivery of the training session, and if those solutions resolve the issues. Finally, speakers will reflect on ideas for possible improvement to the OER training session.

Learning Outcomes: In this case study, learners will come away with an understanding of: How ‘organic’ OER curation played a role in faculty development. Application of OER in an online faculty workshop. Making OER work with constrained timelines and budget.

Speakers
avatar for Bob Casper

Bob Casper

Instructional Design Consultant, Boise State University Center for Teaching & Learning
Bob Casper has been at Boise State University, in Idaho's capital, for over a decade. He currently serves a unit of the University's Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) called Instructional Design and Educational Assessment (IDEA Shop) as an Instructional Design Consultant working... Read More →
avatar for Brian Martin

Brian Martin

Instructional Design Consultant, Boise State University
avatar for Allan Heaps

Allan Heaps

Senior Instructional Design Team Manager, Boise State University
I have been at Boise State for almost 15 years. I am an instructional designer and technologies with more than 30 years in higher education.
avatar for Gina Persichini

Gina Persichini

Instructional Design Consultant, Boise State University - eCampus Center
I am an instructional design consultant at Boise State University’s eCampus Center. I've been a librarian since 1995 and, after spending most of my career in training and development with libraries, I made the easy transition to instructional designer in 2018. I love to talk about... Read More →


Wednesday November 11, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  COVID-19, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

Utilizing Video Tutorials and Improvised Techniques in Online Lab Courses
Since COVID-19 forced all classes to move to an online format last April, many faculty were faced with a dilemma. However, the most challenging classes to move online were labs or hands-on courses. Video tutorials are an obvious strategy to walk students through steps and provide cues to successfully perform required tasks. However, challenges may arise, such as students having limited resources or a lack of equipment to complete the activity, or they may not have a lab partner or volunteer to help them demonstrate the desired skill. The presentation will include video tutorials that were piloted in online classes Spring and Summer 2020. Featured tutorials take into account the limitations that students may have when learning from home. The presentation will feature various video tutorials incorporated into two courses with a hands-on component. The tutorials were used in a CPR/First Aid class and a Human Expression in Martial Arts course. However, the strategiess may be adapted to fit various courses with labs and/or hands-on components.

Learning Outcomes: Participants will learn strategies for adapting labs and hands-on courses when they move to an online format. Featured tutorials incorporate improvised equipment to minimize costs. The presentation will feature various video tutorials incorporated into two courses with a hands-on component.

Speakers
avatar for Natalie Stickney

Natalie Stickney

Assistant Professor, Georgia State Perimeter College
I am an Assistant Professor at Georgia State Perimeter College.  I teach in the Kinesiology and Health department.  In 2019, along with a colleague I received a grant to create affordable content for the CPR/First Aid class I teach.  This will be the main focus of my presentat... Read More →


Wednesday November 11, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  COVID-19, Showcase Gallery

7:30pm EST

Advocacy Starts at Home: Supporting OER as a Parent/Community Member in K-12 Education
During this pandemic, I found myself attending more Board of Education meetings for my school district than ever before. All of the parents of my children's friends now had opinions on online learning and the ed tech platforms being used by the district. Other parents told me they were now emailing the superintendent on a weekly basis. After listening to discussions of the budget that my district was spending on PPE because of the pandemic and the discussion of Black Lives Matter and diversifying the curriculum, OER seemed like the answer in terms of cost and curriculum. These community conversations made me consider my role as a parent and community member and how my expertise in open education could benefit my local schools.

I did some research on K-12 OER and saw that the 2020 Bayview Analytics survey found that OER awareness among K-12 teachers and administrators was low, with only 17% responding that they were very aware or aware of OER. Those who are aware of OER are often fuzzy on the details, particularly around Creative Commons licensing. As a parent and community member, I developed a letter to the superintendent for my local school district about OER. If OER advocates at OpenEd reused, revised, or remixed this letter, we could easily raise awareness of OER in K-12.

Learning Outcomes: Participants will consider their roles as OER advocates as community members and parents in their local school districts.
Participants will be able to retain, reuse, revise, remix, or redistribute a letter for their local school district about the benefits of OER in K-12.

Speakers
avatar for Stacy Katz

Stacy Katz

Open Resources Librarian, Lehman College, CUNY


Wednesday November 11, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Open Education 101, Showcase Gallery

7:30pm EST

5 Apps and 5 Techniques to Create Engaging Online Classes
In Spring of 2020 we had to transition to online classes in one week. As we had to conduct our classes online, we had to find new ways to conduct sessions and exam reviews. This session will be led by a (your title here!) and a Professor so we can share what works in small as well as large classes as well as on the institutional side



The technology we will share is free, and easy to use. Participants will leave with tools that they can immediately adopt in their courses. The delivery of the course will be highly interactive and will model how we teach in our courses.

Learning Outcomes: Our goal is to share tools, and techniques that can immediately be applied by instructors to create comprehensive review sessions. We will show how to:

· Foster an effective review of concept understanding

· Provide engagement techniques

· Promote/rewards studying before the review session

· Encourage students to come to the review session better prepared and with questions

· Ease procrastination in studying

· Decrease anxiety

· Promote the correct use of jargon to define terms

Speakers
avatar for Florencia Gabriele

Florencia Gabriele

Adjunct Professor, Massbay CC
Dr. Florencia Gabriele holds a Ph.D. and M.A. from Northeastern University, an M.A. in International Economics and Finance from Brandeis University, and a B.A. in Economics and Management from Emmanuel College. Dr. Gabriele is a highly sought-after professor and consultant who has... Read More →


Wednesday November 11, 2020 7:30pm - 7:30pm EST
View Anytime
  Practices, Lightning Talk

7:30pm EST

A General Education Science OER by Nonmajor Students
The CORE 101 Pedagogy Project can be found here!

There is oftentimes a mismatch between the level of knowledge required to understand even some of the most basic textbook selections for general education science courses. To that end, students in m